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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Sep 2008
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    Auckland, New Zealand
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    Claytor Jungle Hammock
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    lots of info but hard to work it out exactly

    I have just bout a Clayto JH and know that most people change out the ropes quick smart.
    I have gone through many threads and seen suggestions as to what to do, and so far I seem to have discoverd this: the main webbing used wicks/soaks water and is best replaced so as not to wake up in a puddle; a drip line or ring is advisable either way to try and make water drop before entry to the hammock canopy/tarp; some people refer to the rope/webbing melting, i assume this could be fixed by using a biner in the end of the hammock where the webbing goes, or would this strain the material?; people talk about using two rings then a half hitch, where do you finf the rings?

    I am thinking that the best metchod is to but some climbing tape/webbing, streong enough to hold hundreds and hundred (thousands?) of pounds then cut some off, thread through the hammock ends, tie off, put a biner through that.
    Then make a loop with more tape and a biner to go around the tree (this may cause biner to gash bark though), tie this off, then run a third piece of tape between the biner on the end of the hammock and the biner on the tree.

    Is this realistic or overkill, is there a simpler way? Essentially I am worried about water getting into the hammock and the rope sliding down the tree and me waking up flat on the ground.

    Any tips appreciated, or anthing else I might have missed...

  2. #2
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by iHammock View Post
    I have just bout a Clayto JH and know that most people change out the ropes quick smart.
    I have gone through many threads and seen suggestions as to what to do, and so far I seem to have discoverd this: the main webbing used wicks/soaks water and is best replaced so as not to wake up in a puddle; a drip line or ring is advisable either way to try and make water drop before entry to the hammock canopy/tarp; some people refer to the rope/webbing melting, i assume this could be fixed by using a biner in the end of the hammock where the webbing goes, or would this strain the material?; people talk about using two rings then a half hitch, where do you finf the rings?

    I am thinking that the best metchod is to but some climbing tape/webbing, streong enough to hold hundreds and hundred (thousands?) of pounds then cut some off, thread through the hammock ends, tie off, put a biner through that.
    Then make a loop with more tape and a biner to go around the tree (this may cause biner to gash bark though), tie this off, then run a third piece of tape between the biner on the end of the hammock and the biner on the tree.

    Is this realistic or overkill, is there a simpler way? Essentially I am worried about water getting into the hammock and the rope sliding down the tree and me waking up flat on the ground.

    Any tips appreciated, or anthing else I might have missed...
    There are any number of tricks you can use, including changing the suspension. Or just
    1:cutting the suspension you have, close to the hammock, leaving enough on each side of the channel for knots.

    2:Then tie a bowline as Claytor suggests but 2 instead of one ( one on each side coming out of the channel), clip a biner through the bowline loops ( or tie the loop around some rings, etc). Keep this length of strap at the hammock channel as short as possible so it will be UNDER the tarp.

    3:Then tie ( or clip into biner with another bowline) the remaining longer length of webbing, that will go to the tree, to the same biner, or whatever you are using. Then just do as Claytor suggest- wrap around the tree and come back to the hammock and put two slippery half hitches as you adjust hammock tension/sag. Only instead of tieing through the single bowline he suggests, tie through the biner. 100% of water stopped, as long as the biner is under your tarp.

    Or, in the mean time, while you are trying to figure out which approach you want to take, just do what Claytor says: tie and extra overhand knot ( or two) on each side of the channel. For my son and I, this has so far stopped ALL water flow/wicking at the knots. Just remember, if you change your mind about this, after you have used it a while, you probably won't be able to undo the knots.

    In my experience, a drip line ( or even two, one on each side of the channel) will not work adequately by itself with this suspension. Once the water issue is resolved, I have had no trouble with this suspension or with this webbing. Have fun!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  3. #3
    New Member
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    May 2008
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    Asheville NC
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    I think this is made WAAAY more complicated than it needs to be.

    Here's my experiences (with an Expedition, but I think the system is the same).

    I took the stock webbing and had a friend take two approx 3 foot pieces, sew loops into each end. Fed this through channel in hammock. Put a carabiner through the loops.

    I then take some standard 15mm climbing webbing, pass it through the carabiner, wrap it around my target tree a time or two, and then tie a simple knot- like- really simple- a basic knot, doubled with a loop in the second knot- around the back side of the tree.

    Repeat on the other side, pulling hammock to desired tension before tying knot.

    No issues with drippage or anything, ever. Many (a dozen or more) rainy and/or snowy nights. Dryer than any tent I've ever used.

    I found this system easier to use, actually, than the Jack's sliders- which I like but lost one of, just flipped to tying knots, works great.

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Sep 2008
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    Auckland, New Zealand
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    Claytor Jungle Hammock
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    After some youtube education I have gone out and purchased a couple of wiregate biners (nice and light) and some 6mm climbing rope cut into 1 metre lengths, then worked on my prussic knots, I figure I am half way there now.
    Basically the system neo has in his video seesm simple enough but I have been shown some other stuff to look at as well, I think I will get there in the end!

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