Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    PuckerFactor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW VA
    Hammock
    DIY 11' double layer 1.1
    Tarp
    huge DIY camo
    Insulation
    DIY 9oz. Primaloft
    Suspension
    7/64"whoopie sling
    Posts
    1,208

    Hammock structural ridgeline length

    So I've been looking at lots of pictures of everyone's setup, and noticing that they seem to have a lot less sag than my hammock does, and that got me to wondering how long people have been making their ridgelines. My fabric is 11' and my rl is just over 9'. Does that seem normal? I probably have 3.5' to 4' of deflection from rl to butt.

    I know that in the end, it has to be comfortable, and it is, but having that much sag makes it harder for my 8x10 tarp to cover my butt.
    And since a picture is worth 1000 words, here's one.


    Thanks,
    Acer
    It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

    Formerly known as Acercanto, my trail name is MacGuyver to some, and Pucker Factor to others.

    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness. - Randy Glasbergen

  2. #2
    WV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    southeast WV
    Hammock
    DIY
    Posts
    3,689
    Images
    204

    sag with structural ridgeline

    Sounds like you've identified your variables accurately: rain protection from tarp, ridgeline length (hence hammock sag). You choose. I printed out a paper protractor for some rough measurements of support rope angles when I was calculating forces on main suspension, ridgeline, and hammock ropes, and was surprised to find that my hammock rope angles were greater than 30 degrees (closer to 40). That's probably because I've adjusted my hammock design to let me lie with my feet a bit lower (and different hammocks require different adjustments). My choice in setting up is usually to make the hammock as comfortable as possible. All three parts of my suspension (main suspension, ridgeline, and hammock ropes) are whoopee-adjustable, so if I'm concerned about wind and rain I can raise the hammock by either shortening the hammock ropes or lengthening the ridgeline. I've also devised a way of lowering the tarp, but that's another story.... Good luck. From your picture, it looks like your ridgeline might be adjustable. That's a good place to start. Lengthening it may require shortening your main ropes to the trees.
    David

  3. #3
    PuckerFactor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW VA
    Hammock
    DIY 11' double layer 1.1
    Tarp
    huge DIY camo
    Insulation
    DIY 9oz. Primaloft
    Suspension
    7/64"whoopie sling
    Posts
    1,208
    Thanks, WVhm for the response. You're correct, my ridgeline is a whoopie, as well as my suspension, so I guess I need to quit posting and just start hanging. It's just too darn wet out. :-)
    I guess I also need to get a move on making my next tarp since the one I have now is only 10' long, which gives me 6" leeway on either end. Hmmm, I guess I could make a shorter hammock... Naah, I've got this one dialed in the way I want it. :-)
    I'm mainly curious what other people's hammock fabric to structural ridgeline length ratio is.

    Thanks,
    Acer
    It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

    Formerly known as Acercanto, my trail name is MacGuyver to some, and Pucker Factor to others.

    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness. - Randy Glasbergen

  4. #4
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    near Memphis, TN
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    ZPacks CF
    Insulation
    Te-Wa / HG / WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie Hooks
    Posts
    9,686
    Images
    92
    ENO's are right at 10' long, and the common length used when adding a ridgeline to one is ~100", give or take a couple of inches on each measurement.

    That's very close to yours, when you compare the ratio of fabric length to ridgeline length.
    “I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt.” - Cormac McCarthy

  5. #5
    Doctari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    Custom OES
    Insulation
    DIM UQ NoSniv TQ
    Suspension
    JRB Triglide/strap
    Posts
    2,992
    Images
    30
    Bear in mind that the amount of sag (Therefore ridgeline length) can be a very personal choice. The "head room" from my hammock to my ridgeline is about 2', for a similar length hammock Firewalker has about 3' "headroom". I can sleep in his, & vice-versa, but neither of us are really comfortable. So be sure to allow for adjustment, as you may find your sag too much or too little, also, the hammock material will likely stretch & change your sag & you may need to adjust for that too. I think that is why I don't find Hennesy's comfortable at all, the sag is wrong for ME.
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

  6. #6
    Senior Member E.A.Y.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rescue, CA
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BlackBird
    Tarp
    MacCat, JRB winter
    Insulation
    Crowsnest UQ 3/4
    Suspension
    Depends
    Posts
    897
    Images
    66
    I am in the same boat you are (I've got a gathered end hammock similar to an Eno) and my ridgeline is a scanty 101" long.
    My hammock hangs below the bottom edge of my MacCat Deluxe even with the hammock ridgeline right up under the tarp's ridgeline.
    I do have a shorter hammock (and an even shorter one - which I did not like and salvaged for parts) and that hammock is not quite as comfy but is entirely contained in the tarp.
    I think I'll be switching to a different tarp for nasty weather, just so I can keep my super saggy comfy hang and not have my butt in the breeze, so to speak.
    I need to get out to my favorite hanging park with all my gear and do a lot of figuring about my setup.

  7. #7
    sclittlefield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Northern woods of Maine
    Hammock
    It's a Secret.
    Tarp
    BWDD Winter Dream
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Slings
    Posts
    1,435
    Images
    95
    There was a lengthy thread on this a while back, but the general consensus was that for most people, a ridgeline at 83% the length of the hammock is ideal for comfort. I've found that to be true for me. And, of course, everyone is a little different, so maybe start with that and adjust to fit if you don't find it right for you.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by sclittlefield View Post
    There was a lengthy thread on this a while back, but the general consensus was that for most people, a ridgeline at 83% the length of the hammock is ideal for comfort. I've found that to be true for me. And, of course, everyone is a little different, so maybe start with that and adjust to fit if you don't find it right for you.


    Thank you sclittlefield! That was exactly the information I needed!!!!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    140
    When figuring this out, would you go 83% of the fabric length, or 83% of the length that the RL will actually be spanning? I'm planning on attaching mine to the cinch buckles on my hammock, and they are probably another 6-9" extended from either end.

    Obviously I need to play around and see what's comfortable, just looking for a good starting place. Hammock length or full setup length?

    Also, if I remember right, super tight isn't necessary on a RL, correct? Snug, straight, and taut, but not cranked down under tremendous tension, right?


    Quote Originally Posted by sclittlefield View Post
    There was a lengthy thread on this a while back, but the general consensus was that for most people, a ridgeline at 83% the length of the hammock is ideal for comfort. I've found that to be true for me. And, of course, everyone is a little different, so maybe start with that and adjust to fit if you don't find it right for you.

  10. #10
    Senior Member WarmSoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Hammock
    HH Camo Survivor & DIY GE
    Tarp
    Speer 8x10 sil
    Suspension
    WS
    Posts
    380
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    When figuring this out, would you go 83% of the fabric length, or 83% of the length that the RL will actually be spanning? I'm planning on attaching mine to the cinch buckles on my hammock, and they are probably another 6-9" extended from either end.
    fabric length. 100 inches fabric needs 83 inch ridge line
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Also, if I remember right, super tight isn't necessary on a RL, correct? Snug, straight, and taut, but not cranked down under tremendous tension, right?
    You should be able to, while in the hammock, bend 2 to 3 finger widths into the ridgeline without much difficulty. The bending should be like like this "Z".

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •