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  1. #1
    Senior Member domromer's Avatar
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    Can someone explain the pea pod to me.

    I'v been kicking around the idea of getting a quilt and the pea pod is on the shortlist. I don't really understand it's design though. To me is looks like a sleeping bag that wraps around the entire hammock. Seems like the underneath part would function fine just like a quilt. But on top wouldn't the fabric be held away by the opening of the hammock? How does that keep you warm? Also it seems like a design that would not work real well for those that sleep on the diagonal. Is that an accurate assumption? In the winter do you need to add a top quilt to fill the empty top space in the pea pod? Would it be like bringing an entire sleeping bag and a top quilt?

  2. #2
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    To me is looks like a sleeping bag that wraps around the entire hammock.
    That's it!
    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    ...on top wouldn't the fabric be held away by the opening of the hammock?
    Yes... to what extent depends upon the hammock.
    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    How does that keep you warm?
    By creating a dead air space. You have to heat it, though. In real cold temps, it is better to fill it up with a top quilt.
    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    Also it seems like a design that would not work real well for those that sleep on the diagonal. Is that an accurate assumption?
    It limits the diagonal just a bit, depending upon what hammock you use.
    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    In the winter do you need to add a top quilt to fill the empty top space in the pea pod?
    Yes.
    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    Would it be like bringing an entire sleeping bag and a top quilt?
    Yes!

    - MacEntyre
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
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  3. #3
    Senior Member domromer's Avatar
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    Ok, so...when you being the pea pod you need 3 layers for cold weather. The pea pod it's self. Which has a bottom and top. But unlike a reular sleeping bag the top is held off of you creating extra space that needs to be heated. Then you need to add a quilt to fill that dead space.

    SO why would you use a pea pd and it's 3 layers when you could use an underquilt and a top quilt? Seems like less to carry and more warmth?

  4. #4
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    ...you could use an underquilt and a top quilt?
    That is exactly what you should do!

    HYOH

    - MacEntyre
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
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  5. #5
    Senior Member domromer's Avatar
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    It's not making any more sense but thanks for the responce.

  6. #6
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    I'm not going to defend the PeaPod against what you have already decided. There appears to be no flaw in your understanding.

    If your UQ and TQ weigh the same as a PeaPod, then as you pointed out, what's the difference?

    Go with what you like!

    - MacEntyre
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  7. #7
    Senior Member domromer's Avatar
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    I just thought I was missing some part of the pea pod that made sense in terms of light weight and warmth. It seems like a very expensive sleeping bag that requires another layer compared to quilts and underquilts. I guess it's not for me. Thanks for helping me understand it's function.

  8. #8
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by domromer View Post
    ...light weight and warmth.
    It's 38 - 42 ounces! Not the lightest, but lots of down.

    I'm off to bed now. Gotta get up early and stalk bambi!

    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
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  9. #9
    Senior Member domromer's Avatar
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    I was just looking at the speer's site and I see it's actually rated to 20f. I thought it had a much higher temp rating. So unless it's super cold you wouldn't need to bother with the 3rd layer.

  10. #10
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    FWIW, I just use a sleeping bag as it appears you would use a "peapod". In other words, the hammock just goes through the sleeping bag. In cool or cold weather, a ccf pad is placed between the bottom of the hammock and the sleeping bag. The pad only needs to be long enough to reach from under my shoulders to under my butt.

    Most of my hammocking has been in the NH White Mountains. Each of my sleeping bags have holes at the foot-end. Sleeping bag rating and pad thickness increases with lower temps. For temps around 40 to 60F, I can get away with a bag rated at 40F with either no pad or a 1/4" ccf pad. Lower temps require a warmer bag and thicker pad, with more clothing.

    The coldest I've slept this way was about +10F. At this temp, a tarp tied to the ground also helps keep out the cold. At temps near or below 0F, when those hammockers with underquilts and overquilts are nice and warm, I have to go to the ground in a tent.

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