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  1. #1
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    Underquilts for summer hiking

    Greetings one and all!!!!!

    I am a virgin hanger planning on my summer ritual section hike the last week of August/first week of September. This year's plan is to section from Daleville to Front Royal.

    My question is I have the HHULEA and am now considering the purchase of an underquilt. I have looked on the JRB site and see a couple of options there I like.

    My variables are that I am a hot natured person and for the past several years have used an REI fleece bag liner as my sleeping bag for this time of year. Last year, I remember getting cool at least one night and perhaps even two. But, the rest of the time, I was ok temperature wise.

    Understandably, hammocks by their nature sleep cooler than sleeping on the ground. But, knowing that I am going in a warm weather time of year plus my hot natured ways, I am second guessing my need for an underquilt and the additional weight that it brings. Of course, this is always a matter of personal preference but, I would be interested in hearing your comments regardless.

    Thanks for sharing your experience, strength and hope with an incurable newbie.

    Fat Man Walking

  2. #2
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    I'm a really warm sleeper, too - I can generally take insulation 10*-15* below it's stated rating.

    I guess my advice would be awareness of the conditions you'll be hiking in. Mountain temps, even during the summer, can get below 65*, at which point I generally need some sort of bottom insulation. I've used a fleece sleeping bag inside my hammock and it worked pretty well for mild temps - it's not very compressible. However, it's heavy and bulky. A summer weight underquilt on the bottom and a light jacket (which you'll probably already have) on top would probably be a lighter, less bulky option.

    I should set the tone of my advice by saying that I'm an underquilt manufacturer. I don't sell a summer-weight quilt (at this point), though.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  3. #3
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    I would take an underquilt or closed cell foam pad as bottom insulation. I am a cold sleeper, but I feel the need for something underneath at 70 deg.

    Something to consider. I can use the same quilt year around. If I hang it correct and without any air gaps on the bottom I can get well below 30. If I hang the same quilt a little off the bottom of the hammock I can use the same underquilt at 60+ deg. The same air gaps that cause cold spots and issues at cold temps, can be used to your advantage at higher temps.

    I am taking my 3.5" loft quilt as an underquilt and my 2.5" loft quilt as a top quilt when I leave for my sobo through later this month (man I like saying that). But then again I am walking with fall and expect to see temps from 60 to below freezing from the start. Then I am adding my winder gear for the whites.
    Last edited by Coffee; 06-05-2007 at 00:36.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  4. #4
    Senior Member Frolicking Dino's Avatar
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    HE, I have some nice, warm quilts if you need extra when you get down south. Just let me know.

    While we are discussing under insulation - the female dino is a very cold sleeper - bags rated to 20F (-6.6C) only take the she-dino to about 32F (0C) comfortably on the ground. What sort of under-insulation would you fellows reccomend for overnight temps in mid-50's to 60's F (12.5 - 18C). I have a ridgerest, a BA insulated Aircore and the ability to make quilts.

  5. #5
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolicking Dino View Post
    HE, I have some nice, warm quilts if you need extra when you get down south. Just let me know.

    While we are discussing under insulation - the female dino is a very cold sleeper - bags rated to 20F (-6.6C) only take the she-dino to about 32F (0C) comfortably on the ground. What sort of under-insulation would you fellows reccomend for overnight temps in mid-50's to 60's F (12.5 - 18C). I have a ridgerest, a BA insulated Aircore and the ability to make quilts.
    i find my BA insulated air core feeling chilly in the upper 40s & sometimes in the low 50s.
    but at trail days i wanted to see how it would do in cooler temps if it was inside the pea pod.
    i ended up sleeping in ed's demo hammock w/ the snug fit quilt both nights. the first night (mid 30s) the BA mat was feeling a little chili inside the under quilt... about like it does (for me) w/ no under quilt in the high 40s & low 50s.
    but i woke up the first night & was off the BA mat... it was standing up beside me in the hammock. i was comfortable & warm, but decided to stand up & put the mat back under me for the extra cushioning.
    i was feeling chili again where i was on the mat, but i dealt w/ it & dosed off wanting to give it a chance to warm up inside the warm under quilt. but i awoke a little while later still feeling cool on the mat (every thing else was warm), so i took it out from under me & quickly became warm on the bottom as i laid directly on the hammock w/ the under quilt snugged up next to me.
    point is, the BA insulated air mat has it's limitations as temps get cooler but being enclosed inside an under quilt or pea pod will extend it's range. but at those temps i was still warmer w/o the BA air mat... laying directly against the hammock/ under quilt.
    it seems that my back is doing better (scar tissue going away?) & less sensitive to firm surfaces, so i may be spending some time w/o a mat on trips where i want to really get my weight down. but a mat (even a thin, 3/4 length thermarest still feels better<g>). ...tim
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  6. #6
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Man Walking View Post
    Greetings one and all!!!!!

    I am a virgin hanger planning on my summer ritual section hike the last week of August/first week of September. This year's plan is to section from Daleville to Front Royal.

    My question is I have the HHULEA and am now considering the purchase of an underquilt. I have looked on the JRB site and see a couple of options there I like.

    My variables are that I am a hot natured person and for the past several years have used an REI fleece bag liner as my sleeping bag for this time of year. Last year, I remember getting cool at least one night and perhaps even two. But, the rest of the time, I was ok temperature wise.

    Understandably, hammocks by their nature sleep cooler than sleeping on the ground. But, knowing that I am going in a warm weather time of year plus my hot natured ways, I am second guessing my need for an underquilt and the additional weight that it brings. Of course, this is always a matter of personal preference but, I would be interested in hearing your comments regardless.

    Thanks for sharing your experience, strength and hope with an incurable newbie.

    Fat Man Walking
    Fat Man Walking, et al.

    Couple facts to consider.

    Most people will need some form of bottom insulation below 70-75 after the first 20-30 minutes when the body cools.... even the warm natured, ok, maybe a couple degrees lower.

    A summer UQ is lighter than the inflatables and less bulk than all the possible pad combos....They are less than 2/3rds the weight of a GI (and also the after market models) issue poncho liner and more compressable also.... Plus much warmer, when needed.

    For those with any tendancy to back/butt sweat issues, which are exaccerbated by CCF pads in the summer, it eliminates that problem...Learn to "open the windows" and you will be able to put cooling air under thye head, shoulders and feet while keeping the trunk, read vital organs, warm.

    Wearable models let you eliminate a piece of trunk insuloation for further weight savings.

    Remember I'm biased.

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolicking Dino View Post
    HE, I have some nice, warm quilts if you need extra when you get down south. Just let me know.

    While we are discussing under insulation - the female dino is a very cold sleeper - bags rated to 20F (-6.6C) only take the she-dino to about 32F (0C) comfortably on the ground. What sort of under-insulation would you fellows reccomend for overnight temps in mid-50's to 60's F (12.5 - 18C). I have a ridgerest, a BA insulated Aircore and the ability to make quilts.

    Thanks for the offer, I'll keep that in mind. I think I'll be alright. Right now in addition to the 2 quilts I am starting with, I will have at home my 20 deg down bag, JRB nest, and a potamic.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  8. #8
    Bug-Bait's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    i find my BA insulated air core feeling chilly in the upper 40s & sometimes in the low 50s.
    but at trail days i wanted to see how it would do in cooler temps if it was inside the pea pod.
    i ended up sleeping in ed's demo hammock w/ the snug fit quilt both nights. the first night (mid 30s) the BA mat was feeling a little chili inside the under quilt... about like it does (for me) w/ no under quilt in the high 40s & low 50s.
    but i woke up the first night & was off the BA mat... it was standing up beside me in the hammock. i was comfortable & warm, but decided to stand up & put the mat back under me for the extra cushioning.
    i was feeling chili again where i was on the mat, but i dealt w/ it & dosed off wanting to give it a chance to warm up inside the warm under quilt. but i awoke a little while later still feeling cool on the mat (every thing else was warm), so i took it out from under me & quickly became warm on the bottom as i laid directly on the hammock w/ the under quilt snugged up next to me.
    point is, the BA insulated air mat has it's limitations as temps get cooler but being enclosed inside an under quilt or pea pod will extend it's range. but at those temps i was still warmer w/o the BA air mat... laying directly against the hammock/ under quilt.
    it seems that my back is doing better (scar tissue going away?) & less sensitive to firm surfaces, so i may be spending some time w/o a mat on trips where i want to really get my weight down. but a mat (even a thin, 3/4 length thermarest still feels better<g>). ...tim
    Hi Tim,
    I guess, then, for the summer, the BA Insulated Mat should be OK...but Spring and Fall...and, obviously Winter, one should proabably abandon it and go with bottom insulation. Please keep me/us posted on you further experiences. I don't have a great back, either.
    Michael

  9. #9
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    I have always thought a fleece under quilt would be nice for warmer temps, something shape like a Kick *** Quilt. You could even do a half quilt or 3/4 quilt to reduce the weight and bulk of fleece. At least with fleece you don't have to worry about compressing the insulation.

    I had started a thread about fleece under quilts a long time ago. It's here somewhere. The basic consensus was that fleece is to heavy and bulky versus it's warmth factor to be used as an under quilt. Pan chimed in and said that he had tried fleece before they started making down under quilts.
    Last edited by headchange4u; 06-07-2007 at 08:09.
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  10. #10
    Bug-Bait's Avatar
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    Would Ed's new "Snugfit" be overkill in warmer weather or could it be loosened to allow for some cooling?
    MQ

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