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  1. #1
    Senior Member RAW's Avatar
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    Arborists: What trees should I plant in this situation?

    I've got a freshly graded spot on my Western North Carolina property where I'd like to plant some fruit trees.
    But I'd also like those trees to be of sufficient size and hardiness to withstand some hammock hanging (including group hangs).

    The spot is at roughly 3500 ft. elevation, along the TN/NC state line.
    So I need to pick something that will work in that climate.

    Any thoughts or suggestions?

  2. #2
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    I'm not sure I'd like to hang under fruit trees. Bugs and critters and rotting fruit and fruit dropping on you. No thanks.


    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
    - Mark Twain
    I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.
    - John Burroughs

  3. #3
    Senior Member KerMegan's Avatar
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    unless you want to spend some sizable bucks, you won't get to hang off them for several years-most fruit trees are sold in sapling sizes, and mature in place. moving mature trees tends to kill them..

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    Senior Member RAW's Avatar
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    Patrick, I hadn't thought about that. That's an excellent point.
    Anyone else have experience hanging under fruit trees? Are the bugs and critters a real problem?


    KerMegan, yeah, I know this is a long-term plan. The plan is to live in this spot for the rest of my days.

  5. #5
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    Plant some trees and buy or build a hammock stand. It'll take years to get a good root base and big enough to hang on, fer sure.
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  6. #6
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    my only experience with fruit trees are dwarf trees. I keep them in containers because I don't want to deal with having to cover them with row cover during freezes to protect them. personally, I'd grow a nice hardwood tree that has some good foliage for composting to hang from. Either way, it's going to be a while before you can safely hang from it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Tedinski's Avatar
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    Great trees...

    I guess it depends a lot on WHEN you want to hang under them.

    If you have your "group hangs" in the spring or early summer, there's no problem with fruit falling on your hammock!


    I'd go with the old standbys... apple, pear (though these may stay too small to hook up a hammock for a looong while) and cherry.

    You'll have to look up some specifics having to do with your altitude, but you'll find something that works.

    Imagine the first spring you have a group hang, and bring out the apple butter and cherry preserves!

  8. #8
    Senior Member 41vi4's Avatar
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    When I was growing, there were several mature apple trees in my backyard and I never noticed much of a bug problem while sitting in their shade. Probably will depend on where you are and the type of tree, but fruit trees will take some extra caring. I've been planing to put some apple trees in my backyard next year and looking at the options here.

  9. #9
    Senior Member RAW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gargoyle View Post
    Plant some trees and buy or build a hammock stand. It'll take years to get a good root base and big enough to hang on, fer sure.
    I've got plenty of other trees to hang from . . . plenty.
    But I just thought it would be neat if several years from now the "orchard" was a nice place to hang.

  10. #10
    PuckerFactor's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    If you want something to hang off of quickly, Tulip Poplar is a good standby. It grows quickly, doesn't drop a lot of crap, generally has good form, and turns a pretty yellow in the fall. The downside is that the wood is somewhat brittle, so if your house would be in it's "fall zone", maybe go with something else.

    Other thoughts off the top of my head would be White Ash, American or European Beech, any of the Oaks..

    If you want to stick with fruit trees, maybe consider a nut tree? Pecan, maybe not Walnut .

    Personally, I'd go with a nice grove of European Beeches, all nicely spaced. DENSE cool shade in the summer, purple to bronze colored leaves, beautiful form.

    Hope that gives you some ideas,
    Acer the Arborist
    It's better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

    Formerly known as Acercanto, my trail name is MacGuyver to some, and Pucker Factor to others.

    It's not procrastinating, its proactively delaying the implementation of the energy-intensive phase of the project until the enthusiasm factor is at its maximum effectiveness. - Randy Glasbergen

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