Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33
  1. #11
    Scottybdiving's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Spicewood, TX
    Hammock
    WBBB, Switchback 1.9 SL & 1.9 DL
    Tarp
    BDWD, AE Hard Rock
    Insulation
    Incubator, Burrow
    Suspension
    Webbing & Rings
    Posts
    737
    I vote for pecan as well, assuming they grow in that part of the country. Not only do they make good trees, they are a great property improvement. I planted a dozen over a few years, with a irrigation system.

  2. #12
    Senior Member DougTheElder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aiken, South Carolina
    Posts
    504
    Images
    4
    Aside from being a small-time sod monger, I also sell trees. How may I be of service!

    I think having an orchard may be a good idea for the relative near future. Your local county extension agent would be a good source of information on that. But, to ask a new planting to do double duty and provide fruit, shade, and hammock support may be asking a little too much. Acercanto's advice is good. Look around and see what the good Lord planted...He knew what would grow well there. A few properly spaced specimen sized trees can give good shade and support in just a few years. While you're waiting to hang your hammock, you could grow some grapes, make some wine, let it age, then invite us all up to your place. Now that's a plan!
    Sometimes even a Blind Hog finds an Acorn

  3. #13
    Senior Member molawns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    S.W. FL
    Hammock
    Clark NX-250 Camo
    Tarp
    10X10
    Insulation
    thermarest
    Suspension
    rings and straps
    Posts
    199
    Images
    13
    Pecan trees are "natural pruners", meaning they shed limbs on a fairly regular basis. Not the best choice for hammocking.

    The majority of fruit trees are usually thin-barked, and would likely sustain some damage from hanging (IMO).

    I'd plant either Oak, Hickory, or Walnut.
    Yesterday's tomorrow is tomorrow's yesterday. It's the only day that counts.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Trooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Lake St. Clair
    Hammock
    HH Hyperlite & WBBB 1.0 Double
    Insulation
    Crowsnest/No Snive
    Posts
    820
    Images
    9
    Everyone is correct about this taking some time for the trees to mature. However, a good mix of trees that flower in the Spring and have vibrant autumn colors would be worth it.

    I would personally do a mix of at Bradford Pears, Cleveland Pears, various Cherries, Maples, Oaks, Tulip Poplars, and some tall pines. I have all of the above on my property, and because the fruit trees are ornamental they don't drop any fruit. The bugs aren't an issue and most of the trees can be bought for about $25 at the major home supply stores. They will hold your weight within 5 years.

    Avoid Sweet Gums, despite their great fall colors, their shape isn't that great and they drop those nasty spiked balls. I would also avoid the Crab Apple because it does drop fruit. Bradford Pears are great trees, but they are far more prone to wind damage than the Cleveland Pear.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Tedinski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Suburbs outside the Stix
    Hammock
    I have two HH's, 1 Scout, 1 ExpAsym
    Tarp
    Big.
    Insulation
    None.Insultex soon
    Suspension
    Trees! :)
    Posts
    194

    For hammocks, or for fruit?

    You have a large property w/ trees, and this one area to plant fruit trees? If so, I can't imagine planting more trees just to hang from!

    Get some of that fruit! Everybody's quite right about it taking a while, but if this is your dream property then time isn't an issue.

    Nut trees are great, too. Our property has a lot of hickory and beech. Makes for great trail mix and pies. (Nut pies are awesome, but RICH. We make one pecan or other nut pie for every 5 fruit pies.)

    The link (earlier in thread) had some great fruit trees. I didn't see Northern Spy, which is one of my favorites. It's good for colder climes, and perhaps for your altitude as well?


    Enjoy your new acreage!

  6. #16
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing & rings
    Posts
    10,595
    Images
    319
    Since you're thinking that far ahead, I'd also think about other hanging areas on your property too. The orchard could be a pretty neat place to hang some day, but you may find your self avoiding it a little more when the fruit is falling to the ground.

    I have a large fig tree. Late summer when the first fruits begin to ripen & fall to the ground, bees & hornets of all kinds are working the ripe figs until cool weather. It's amazing how many there are some times.
    Occasionally, one of the wasps/hornets will stand his ground, daring me to get to close
    But it may be less the case w/ apples & such. I believe some apples don't even get rip until fall.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Hammock
    WL Lite Owl
    Tarp
    Etowah
    Insulation
    WL UQ
    Posts
    121
    Honey crisp apples and blight resistant chestnuts*. 3500 feet is a cool climate but if the honey crisp can make it in MN it will do fine in NC.

    *Every year we are a little closer to a truly blight resistant American Chestnut.

  8. #18
    Senior Member RAW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    GA
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7Dbl
    Tarp
    Superfly w/doors
    Insulation
    JRB TQ, Te-Wa UQ
    Suspension
    Straps&dutch-clips
    Posts
    614
    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    Since you're thinking that far ahead, I'd also think about other hanging areas on your property too.
    Yeah, I've got plenty of places to choose from.
    Just gotta scout out specific sites and clean 'em up.

    Quick GoogleEarth sketch of the area.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Tedinski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Suburbs outside the Stix
    Hammock
    I have two HH's, 1 Scout, 1 ExpAsym
    Tarp
    Big.
    Insulation
    None.Insultex soon
    Suspension
    Trees! :)
    Posts
    194
    That's terrible!

    Somebody painted a bunch of blue lines all over your nice trees....

  10. #20
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing & rings
    Posts
    10,595
    Images
    319
    Nice strip of land! Looks like you've got a ridge line there! I like that!
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •