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  1. #1
    Senior Member 6 feet over's Avatar
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    The big trip is almost here...

    The big trip is almost here. Iím off to my friends 200 acres in the mountains next week. Of course, Iím going about it all wrong! I have a few test hangs under my belt, but no over nights yet. Iím taking my son (11) and weíll be spending at least 3 (maybe 4) nights. (I know I should have done some test nights closer to home, but I donít have any suitable trees close by, and didnít have time to make a hammock stand yet)

    I do have a fail safe. I have the keys to his cabin in case things go totally wrong (but Iím not telling my son that ).

    On the agenda:
    Hiking
    Photography (& video)
    Archery
    Firearms (instruction & safety)
    Fishing
    Fire making
    Knot tying
    Bike riding
    GPS (Garmin Rino practice)
    Map & compass practice
    Swimming
    Journal writing (Iíll have him make daily entries and save them)
    Any other good ideas? Iím looking for other activities to keep him busy (no Game Boyís allowed!)

    I canít wait! I have several new items pending to be shipped to me, but they should get here before I go.

    THE TEST: The BIG TEST is weíll have one Clark NA and one Claytor Jungle Hammock (assuming it gets delivered in time!). Iíll get to see how each performs and try several types of set ups. Neo would be proud since Iíll be putting two new SG tarps to good use. Probably more of a test is that neither of us has much sleeping outdoors experience (at least where bears are a real possibility !) Iíve spent a good amount of time in the woods, but not sleeping.

    Hereís a Ďcampí question. Have you guys ever used a much larger tarp for a Ďstanding aroundí shelter for a base camp? Any tips on how this should be set up? Will 550 para cord do the job for a long ridgeline? Do you incorporate a bungie to keep the ridgeline taut? Any tips on this?

    Well, wish us luck. A little rain (one night) would be a good test, but I hope Mother Nature makes an exception and treats us kindly.

    6 ft
    The harder I work, the luckier I get.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Sounds like a good plan. It looks like you got everything covered. I would bring a couple extra cheap closed cell foam pads. You can get them at walmart for $5. Just incase you guys get cold underneath at night. They make a huge difference.

    Para cord will work for a tarp. I used it on mine to test it out. I would not use it as any load bearing hammock line though. It will break really easily.

    You could have your son help you hang them. It might be fun for you two to learn together.

    Have fun, it sounds like a blast.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  3. #3
    Senior Member 6 feet over's Avatar
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    I will have two cheap pads (plus one inflatable from SG). The Claytor (so I’ve heard) has a double bottom that will take the pad between. I’m planning on using the under pockets of the Clark as advertised and see how they perform. I definitely plan on his help setting up. I’d like him to start learning knots. No down side to learning that skill.

    The lowest overnight low for Williamsport, PA (closest ‘city’ to where we’ll be) for the 5 day forecast is 55°. Cool enough to show chinks in the armor, but not cold enough to chase me into the cabin (I think). I have a big truck and I’m not known for being under prepared. I’ll have other gear if needed, but the plan is to not even let my son know we can get in the cabin.

    Do most of you under quilt guys not even use a sleeping bag anymore? Just a blanket type cover?

    6 ft
    The harder I work, the luckier I get.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    I just use a top quilt. Before that I used my sleeping bag as a quilt. It was too hard with my hh to get into the bag. Plus any insulation underneath is compressed and worthless. This way the extra bag width served as extra insulation on top.

    I think most people use it this way.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Elmira, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6 feet over View Post
    I will have two cheap pads (plus one inflatable from SG). The Claytor (so Iíve heard) has a double bottom that will take the pad between. Iím planning on using the under pockets of the Clark as advertised and see how they perform. I definitely plan on his help setting up. Iíd like him to start learning knots. No down side to learning that skill.

    The lowest overnight low for Williamsport, PA (closest Ďcityí to where weíll be) for the 5 day forecast is 55į. Cool enough to show chinks in the armor, but not cold enough to chase me into the cabin (I think). I have a big truck and Iím not known for being under prepared. Iíll have other gear if needed, but the plan is to not even let my son know we can get in the cabin.

    Do most of you under quilt guys not even use a sleeping bag anymore? Just a blanket type cover?

    6 ft
    I was camping not far from Williamsport this past weekend and tried out my bag as a quilt for the first time. I had a 1/4 inch, 36" wide pad in My Claytor JH and was toasty. The temps were in the fifties. It's soooo much easier getiing in and out of the hammock when using it as a quilt. I zipped it just enough to form a footbox and wrapped the rest around the three exposed sides of my body. Give it a try.

    Miguel

  6. #6
    Senior Member Funny Money's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    Quilts (I use JRB) are not only easier and very comfortable, but they're more versatile (ie: venting) as well. As has already been said, unzip your bag and try it --- if you like using an unzipped bag, you'll love using a quilt.
    -- Funny Money
    ------------------
    Love 'em while you got 'em

  7. #7
    Senior Member 6 feet over's Avatar
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    Quilt, blanket, what's the difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by Miguel View Post
    I was camping not far from Williamsport this past weekend and tried out my bag as a quilt for the first time. I had a 1/4 inch, 36" wide pad in My Claytor JH and was toasty. The temps were in the fifties. It's soooo much easier getiing in and out of the hammock when using it as a quilt. I zipped it just enough to form a footbox and wrapped the rest around the three exposed sides of my body. Give it a try.

    Miguel
    Quote Originally Posted by toddhiker View Post
    Quilts (I use JRB) are not only easier and very comfortable, but they're more versatile (ie: venting) as well. As has already been said, unzip your bag and try it --- if you like using an unzipped bag, you'll love using a quilt.
    I will. (Dumb question alert!) Everyone uses the term quilt, but it sounds like any blanket I have around would work. Correct?
    The harder I work, the luckier I get.

  8. #8
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6 feet over View Post
    I will. (Dumb question alert!) Everyone uses the term quilt, but it sounds like any blanket I have around would work. Correct?
    It would work fine. Just be sure to have the right clothing to sleep in just in case.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  9. #9
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6 feet over View Post
    I will. (Dumb question alert!) Everyone uses the term quilt, but it sounds like any blanket I have around would work. Correct?
    The difference between a quilt and a blanket is that a blanket is generally one material through-and-through. A quilt generally (like a sleeping bag) uses a high-quality insulation that's both highly insulative and fairly fragile. The trade-off is lower weight and less bulk for the amount of insulation you're getting, versus having to deal with a less-than-durable material.

    To handle part of the durability issue, quilts have different materials on the outside, thus protecting the insulation. They also utilize some sort of stabilization method - commonly stitching or quilt loops - to help keep the fragile insulation from coming apart inside the shell. Thus the term "quilt"; in fact, as far as I know, a piece of insulating gear isn't actually a quilt unless it uses some sort of quilting process. For instance, from NCPatrick's report, the top quilt sold by Fanatic Fringe wouldn't qualify as an actual "quilt."
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  10. #10
    Senior Member ringtail-THFKAfood's Avatar
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    IMHO "comforter" would be the better word choice for what we use to keep us warm. But is has been called a 'quilt" for so long that I would get confused if it were changed.
    It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.
    - Mark Twain

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