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  1. #11
    Member J_Squared's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    In a hammock, the center of gravity slides towards the lowest spot. In a man, the center of gravity is in our chest. Therefore, it's natural for our chest to gravitate towards the lowest point in the hammock...which ends up crowding our feet into the foot end of the hammock and leaving a huge space over our heads. But hanging the foot end higher means the hammock's lowest point is closer to the head end rather than in the middle...so when you settle your body is actually more centered in the hammock.
    Well it doesn't sound so unconventional when you put it in scientific terms like that.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    One of the frustrating things about being a hammock newbie is the learning curve...people often forget that, at one time, they had to learn how to camp. Now that it's second nature, the idea of learning new skills to accomplish the same old tasks (staying dry and - ahem - comfortable) is like a foreign concept.

    But the principles behind ground camping and hammocking are all they same...they're just applied differently. Most of the criticisms about hammocking that people post on the internet just show that they don't really understand how the system works, and the principles behind it.

    But then, some people just aren't comfortable in hammocks and that leaves more trees for us.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
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    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  3. #13
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    I'm a long distant backpacker and have been extremely happy with my Speer hammock,actually the only hammock I've owned.

    I think it would be safe to say that after a long days hike I'm pretty tired which aids in a good nights rest.

    I simply took the advice aquired from this forum even before my first hang.

    I always have my feet slightly higher,use a ridge line and i actually put my pack under my knees and wake up in the same position which usually feels like only minutes.
    I use a Neoair pad "below 60" and camp pillow with my head leaning against the high sides,holy grail.

    I hang low so i can pet my dog before i fall asleep.

  4. #14
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off-road View Post
    I'm a long distant backpacker and have been extremely happy with my Speer hammock,actually the only hammock I've owned.

    I think it would be safe to say that after a long days hike I'm pretty tired which aids in a good nights rest.

    I simply took the advice aquired from this forum even before my first hang.

    I always have my feet slightly higher,use a ridge line and i actually put my pack under my knees and wake up in the same position which usually feels like only minutes.
    I use a Neoair pad "below 60" and camp pillow with my head leaning against the high sides,holy grail.

    I hang low so i can pet my dog before i fall asleep.
    I see it! ...... nice description. Sounds good.
    Shug
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off-road View Post
    I'm a long distant backpacker and have been extremely happy with my Speer hammock,actually the only hammock I've owned.

    I think it would be safe to say that after a long days hike I'm pretty tired which aids in a good nights rest.

    I simply took the advice aquired from this forum even before my first hang.

    I always have my feet slightly higher,use a ridge line and i actually put my pack under my knees and wake up in the same position which usually feels like only minutes.
    I use a Neoair pad "below 60" and camp pillow with my head leaning against the high sides,holy grail.

    I hang low so i can pet my dog before i fall asleep.


    I didn't realize i was using so many i's in my post.
    Had i reviewed before i posted i'd likely eliminated some i's.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
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    After buying a HH I made a few Speers and discovered my comfort was increased even more When:
    1. making the hammock a little longer
    2. making it a little wider
    3 getting the ridgeline just right
    and possibly most important THO all these things are prolly related-
    4. shaping the channel ends into a slightly concave arc(opposite of the Speer approach).

    My lovable DIY Mutts!
    Last edited by riverkeeper; 04-20-2010 at 00:06.
    "There's no accounting for other people's taste in love, fiction and huntin' dogs." ---Mark Twain

  7. #17
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacEntyre View Post
    My Speer is more forgiving than my HH was. I hang it with a lot of sag, equivalent to a short ridgeline. Many people change the whipping on the ends to get it right for them. I haven't done that, but if I did, I would try to eliminate the high sides... it is harder to get out than it should be, and it is not as comfy as a lounge chair as it should be, both because of the high sides.
    Mac,

    What do you mean by changing the whipping? The last post above talks about a concave vs convex shaping of the channel ends (whatever that means) -- is this what you are referring to? I agree that the high sides can make exiting troublesome at times.

    The only discomfort I've experienced is when the hammock is hung with insufficient sag -- this results in my shoulders being squeezed. I find the center of the hammock as comfy as laying diagonally.

    When you and others talk about a ridgeline, I assume you're not talking about the ridgeline that accompanies the hammock to support the BugNet? Because one end is shockcorded to the D-ring on the strap, it doesn't control sag in any way. Thus, I'm assuming you've added a structural ridgeline. Where have you attached this structural ridgeline to -- the hammock ends, or the D-rings on the straps?

    Thanks,

    FarStar

  8. #18
    MacEntyre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarStar View Post
    What do you mean by changing the whipping? The last post above talks about a concave vs convex shaping of the channel ends (whatever that means) -- is this what you are referring to?
    Yes! The Speer method of whipping pulls in a little more of the edges than the middle, resulting in tight hammock edges and high sides. I suppose Ed does that so that the velcro along the hammock edges does a better job of supporting the bugnet and the Snugfit.

    Quote Originally Posted by FarStar View Post
    ...assuming you've added a structural ridgeline.
    No, I don't use a structural ridgeline.

    I add one when I use the IX Hammock Sock. That ridgeline is a whoopie sling, and it attaches directly to the whoopie sling suspension.
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
    www.MollyMacGear.com

  9. #19
    New Member
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    Following up on FarStar's post, can you attach a structural ridgeline to a Speer hammock with the stock suspension and bug net? Laying inside and looking up, I can't picture how it is done. Thanks.

  10. #20
    Senior Member leroybrown's Avatar
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    Lots of testing... which means lots of naps... and thats good for the soul.[/QUOTE]

    sorry to butt in: I just think this is very quote worthy

    Have you tried something under your knees? That is how I find my sweet spot

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