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  1. #1
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Determining ripstop weight

    I need some help from you smart people out there.

    I stumbled across about 14 yards of some ripstop at a yard sale; paid $3! Sweet deal, but I have no clue how to determine what the weight is. I have some 1.9 at home and it "feels" the same, but I doubt that means much.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I just do it by look and feel. I hold it up to the light. If I see a bunch of little specs of light shining though it is 1.1, if not and it looks thicker it is 1.9. That doesn't hold true for treated.

    Then again, I have used one or two yards of ripstop before. That plays into it a little.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
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  3. #3
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Measure the width and length (in inches) of the piece you have, then multiply the two together. Now divide by 216. The result is the number of square yards. Then weigh the material and divide the weight by the number of square yards. Now you have weight per yard. Simple.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackbishop351 View Post
    Measure the width and length (in inches) of the piece you have, then multiply the two together. Now divide by 216. The result is the number of square yards. Then weigh the material and divide the weight by the number of square yards. Now you have weight per yard. Simple.
    Yeah I guess that works too. I tried that once. It came close but not exact. You may have to round a little.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackbishop351 View Post
    Measure the width and length (in inches) of the piece you have, then multiply the two together. Now divide by 216. The result is the number of square yards. Then weigh the material and divide the weight by the number of square yards. Now you have weight per yard. Simple.
    I'm missing something. A square yard is 36" x 36" or 3' x 3'. 36 x 36 = 1296. 3 x3 = 9, and a square foot is 144", so 9x144=1296, the same thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is "where do you get the 216?"

    Let's say that I have 3 running yards of cloth, 60 inches wide. (3*36) x 60 = 6480. 6480 / 1296 = 5 square yards. Weigh the cloth and divide by 5 to get the ounces per square yard.

    A shorter version: Ounces per Square Yard = Weight / ((Length x Width) / 1296)).

    Folks make fun of math, but if you can get X to one side of the equation and everything else on the other side, you can move the earth. Forget Archimedes, Newton is where it's at! (Geek joke, and not very funny to boot.)

    Anyway, I'm sure that the 216 would make sense if I weren't really tired, so go ahead and give me that Homer Simpson moment, why don't ya! :}

  6. #6
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightwalker View Post
    I'm missing something. A square yard is 36" x 36" or 3' x 3'. 36 x 36 = 1296. 3 x3 = 9, and a square foot is 144", so 9x144=1296, the same thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is "where do you get the 216?"

    Let's say that I have 3 running yards of cloth, 60 inches wide. (3*36) x 60 = 6480. 6480 / 1296 = 5 square yards. Weigh the cloth and divide by 5 to get the ounces per square yard.

    A shorter version: Ounces per Square Yard = Weight / ((Length x Width) / 1296)).

    Folks make fun of math, but if you can get X to one side of the equation and everything else on the other side, you can move the earth. Forget Archimedes, Newton is where it's at! (Geek joke, and not very funny to boot.)

    Anyway, I'm sure that the 216 would make sense if I weren't really tired, so go ahead and give me that Homer Simpson moment, why don't ya! :}
    Typo...sorry!
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  7. #7
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Thank you wise ones.

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    Senior Member Frolicking Dino's Avatar
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    The she-dino non-techie method. I have items made of 1.1, 1.9 and 2.3 around. I just compare the material to those to determine what weight it is.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolicking Dino View Post
    The she-dino non-techie method. I have items made of 1.1, 1.9 and 2.3 around. I just compare the material to those to determine what weight it is.
    That would probably work, but the only sample I have that I know the weight of is 1.9. Without something else to compare with I doubt I'd be able to notice the difference.....yet.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolicking Dino View Post
    The she-dino non-techie method. I have items made of 1.1, 1.9 and 2.3 around. I just compare the material to those to determine what weight it is.
    That's my style. All this math is too much for me.

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