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Thread: 4x4? 4x6?

  1. #11
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
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    yeah i think when i dig mine up...well..more like pull them out with the atv LOL

    i'm going to do the same...so i can take them out when i'm mowing

    that and your in the northwest too so if you want to cement a stand i would stay clear of wood...

    with all the crazy weather you get that won't help either
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  2. #12
    Member I Splice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimator View Post
    Hey all. The house I just moved into has ONE really nice tree I have permission from the other half (she owns the house ) to do whatever is needed to give me a place to hang. I'm figuring a treated 10' post concreted 3' deep. Would a 4x6 be overkill or would a 4x4 be ok? Either way I'm going to put a eye screw near the top with rope staked out to the backside of it. Suggestions?
    For mine, I used a 4x4 with a cement couterweight and a brace on the hammock side. I haven't hung from it much, bit I think a single 4x4 will be undersized

  3. #13
    Senior Member opie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimator View Post
    Thanks for the quick replies guys! But do you all think that 2' on my post sleeve will be deep enough even with the rear anchors? I plan on using pretty stout steel for my upright.....
    Yes. Because you are effectively transferring most of the force to your ground anchor. Weight on the post will be more vertical than horizontal. Its the same theory as when you use a trekking pole to hike up one end of your tarp. The weight is displaced down the length of the pole rather than at an angle to it.

    Also.. if you do go this route... as you pound your sleeve in, give it a couple whacks and then pull it out and knock the dirt out. Continue this process untill you get it level with existing grade. Then throw a couple small stones in the sleeve. This will prevent your upright from simply pushing down into the ground below the sleeve.
    I am not a gram weenie. , But Im starting to see the merits!!!

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  4. #14
    optimator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opie View Post
    Yes. Because you are effectively transferring most of the force to your ground anchor. Weight on the post will be more vertical than horizontal.

    Also.. if you do go this route... as you pound your sleeve in, give it a couple whacks and then pull it out and knock the dirt out. Continue this process untill you get it level with existing grade. Then throw a couple small stones in the sleeve. This will prevent your upright from simply pushing down into the ground below the sleeve.
    I was planning on digging a hole and concreting it in. That way I really shouldn't have many worries?
    It's only an addiction if your trying to quit

  5. #15
    Senior Member opie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimator View Post
    I was planning on digging a hole and concreting it in. That way I really shouldn't have many worries?
    You can, but its not neccessary.

    I dont think you need a 2' wide hole if you do.

    We removed a chain link fence last summer. 4' poles probably 2.5' in the gound with only 6" of concrete around them the depth of the hole and my truck wouldnt pull them out of the ground. Bent them, laid them over nice but wouldnt pull them out.
    I am not a gram weenie. , But Im starting to see the merits!!!

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  6. #16
    Senior Member opie's Avatar
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    And my sleeves are 40" because

    a) they were free and I didnt feel like cutting them

    b) I have soft, sandy soil. If I had clay, I would have cut them down for ease of installation.
    I am not a gram weenie. , But Im starting to see the merits!!!

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  7. #17
    optimator's Avatar
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    Sounds good to me then! I'll be able to get that pounded in tomorrow. Then off to the steel yard after work Monday. I'll have my buddy in the fab shop at work make me up a couple of stakes from some scrap steel. Finally, hanging in the back yard
    It's only an addiction if your trying to quit

  8. #18
    Senior Member G.L.P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by opie View Post
    You can, but its not neccessary.

    I dont think you need a 2' wide hole if you do.

    We removed a chain link fence last summer. 4' poles probably 2.5' in the gound with only 6" of concrete around them the depth of the hole and my truck wouldnt pull them out of the ground. Bent them, laid them over nice but wouldnt pull them out.
    i say 2' because of the weight that will be put at the top of the 4x4
    my Dad had a fence contracting company and when we are putting in post for anything that will have lots of weight at the top of the post we make the holes wider to handle the weight forced on the top of the post...if the hole is too small after awhile the post will work it's way free...and you will have a free floating cement block in the ground that moves

    now a fence doesn't have all the weight at the top..it's spread out along the hole post and there is a top post that runs along the top on most fences that
    will help with this as well so the hole does not need to be as wide
    and don't forget most companys to save on $$ and man power will not make the holes as wide...so they save on cement...
    It puts the Underquilt on it's hammock ... It does this whenever it gets cold

  9. #19
    Senior Member opie's Avatar
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    Make sure you post up some pics!!

    And watch those stakes. Originally I used some 1/2" rebar because its WIHOH. Not that safe with the kids and mower blade.

    Those cable anchors are nice, and not that expensive.
    I am not a gram weenie. , But Im starting to see the merits!!!

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  10. #20
    Senior Member opie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenlespaul View Post
    i say 2' because of the weight that will be put at the top of the 4x4
    my Dad had a fence contracting company and when we are putting in post for anything that will have lots of weight at the top of the post we make the holes wider to handle the weight forced on the top of the post...if the hole is too small after awhile the post will work it's way free...and you will have a free floating cement block in the ground that moves

    now a fence doesn't have all the weight at the top..it's spread out along the hole post and there is a top post that runs along the top on most fences that
    will help with this as well so the hole does not need to be as wide
    and don't forget most companys to save on $$ and man power will not make the holes as wide...so they save on cement...
    Yes.. But if you are loading the post on one side, and 180 degrees from that you have a line running to a ground anchor, you are effectively transferring most of the load to the ground anchor. The post will carry the weight down its length and the force is transferred to the tie out.

    If optimator wasnt planning on using guylines, I would support the 2' wide hole, 2' deep filled with crete.
    I am not a gram weenie. , But Im starting to see the merits!!!

    Kris' Splicing

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