Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    ricktreks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Panama City, Panama
    Hammock
    Darien Hammock, by dream-hammock
    Tarp
    MLD HexTarp Cuben
    Insulation
    MLD TQ, AHE UQ
    Suspension
    AHE dyna whoopies
    Posts
    51

    Hammock Winter Camping versus Hilleberg Tent

    Hello guys and gals,

    I need some help deciding between using a hammock for camping in winter conditions, or bringing a tent (ouch!).

    Here's my story:

    I'm a hammocker in the tropics. I own two Hennessy Hammocks and don't believe there is a better shelter for the tropical jungle than a hammock. So I already have experience in that area.

    But I wasn't so sure hammocks were suited for cold and windy conditions, until I started doing some research on winter hammocking. Now, far from convinced, I'm in real doubt.

    My last experience in cold weather was down in Patagonia. My girlfriend and I camped in a cheap rental tent. We could hardly go out of the tent because it got really cold and windy. I don't know how windy it actually got down there, but locals said later that winds of 120 Km/h (75 mph), are not at all uncommon.

    We were very glad that our tent had a little vestibule that allowed us to cook indoors, protected from the elements. So we decided that next time we wanted to backpack in cold, temperate areas we needed to bring our own expedition tent with a larger vestibule.

    The time has come to get that tent, as I'm planning a trip to New Zealand Southern Alps in their late fall. So I settled for a Hilleberg Nallo GT2. It has an enormous vestibule, yet it's considered ultralight and rated all-season.

    But now it looks like I'm going to be camping alone, and for the price of that tent ($645), there could be some alternatives in the hammock world.

    I already have the hammock, but it seems like I would need a top quilt, under quilt and a bigger tarp. Now, before I make all that investment, I would like to hear some of your opinions.

    The products I've looked into are: JRB Nest (HH slit) under quilt; JRB Old Rag Mtn top quilt; and Warbonnet Big Mamajamba tarp.

    Do you honestly think that a hammock set up like this would fare well in harsh windy conditions?

    If so, does this require a lot of know-how? Like I said, I'm very proficient with my hammock in the jungle, but I've never used top or under quilts, and I definitely don't see myself coming out of my hammock in a windy night, to tauten loose guy lines on a tarp.

    Finally, would the savings both in weight and money be worth considering versus getting the Hilleberg tent, which is very easy to set up, and offers superb protection and insulation? It costs $645, and weighs 2.7 Kg (5 lbs 15 oz.).

    I greatly appreciate your help and your dedication to the hammocking community.

    Cheers,

    Rick

  2. #2
    babelfish5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Conroe, Tx
    Hammock
    BB 1.7 DL
    Tarp
    MacCat SpinnUL
    Insulation
    Crowsnest
    Suspension
    Adjustable Webbing
    Posts
    774
    Images
    1
    What's he temps and wind supposed to be that time of year? I don't think a tarp could handle a 75mph wind. Plus, it will take a very hardy tent to handle that. Hence the cost of the Hilleberg tent.

    If the wind is going to be minimal then I would suggest the underquilt and top quilt combo. However, if your looking at high winds, the tent may be better. That's just my opinion, I could be wrong.
    "Once you start down the Dark Path, forever will it dominate your destiny." - Yoda


    Hungry Hammock Hanger Website

  3. #3
    MacEntyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Jamestown, NC
    Hammock
    Molly Mac Gear
    Posts
    7,559
    Images
    6
    One ounce shy of 6 lbs is considered an ultralight tent?

    I wouldn't want to go anywhere with gear I hadn't tested first. You need a shakedown cruise before you cross the ocean, so to speak! Then you will know whether your gear can handle the extreme conditions of Patagonia and New Zealand.

    - MacEntyre
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
    www.MollyMacGear.com

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bleemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Hammock
    JRB Bridge and WBBB 1.0 DBL
    Tarp
    Mamajamba SpinnUL
    Insulation
    Gossamer Gear 1/4"
    Suspension
    Whoopie slings!
    Posts
    318
    Having been in the far southern latitudes wind is an almost everyday occurrence and more often than not it is above what I would consider to be fun with a tarp. Rather be with my girlfriend in a tent built for severe weather.

    Far southern NZ can have areas without trees.

    Go with the tent and start dating a chiropractor!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mountainside, NJ
    Hammock
    depends on weather
    Tarp
    SWT
    Insulation
    various
    Suspension
    Straps, Dutch Clip
    Posts
    1,502
    Images
    11
    Some good references that come to mind are Shug and Turk. They've slept in cold (WELL below zero F) and in wind but I don't remember how much wind with how much cold. There are others on HF that have experience as well. I'm sure someone will chime in. I've only been down to 11* F and 35 to 40 mph winds.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,557
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    Some good references that come to mind are Shug and Turk. They've slept in cold (WELL below zero F) and in wind but I don't remember how much wind with how much cold. There are others on HF that have experience as well. I'm sure someone will chime in. I've only been down to 11* F and 35 to 40 mph winds.
    Yeah well, Turk had one bad night when his homemade shelter disentegrated in a high wind. I've never been to New Zealand, pics I've seen show a lot of alpine (read zero trees), maybe that's why they call it the alps (Duh). I would take the Hilleburg. Get a good ground pad, a ridgerest (or evazote) and a short Prolite 3. And yes, six pounds is a LIGHT two man shelter that can withstand alpine conditions.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •