View Poll Results: Would you ever buy an underquilt that is not a differentially cut UQ.

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  • Yes

    14 25.93%
  • No

    30 55.56%
  • Maybe - explained in post

    10 18.52%
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  1. #31
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wisenber View Post
    It is true that you can use a Mt Washington as a top quilt; however, the 42" width of that quilt versus the 48" width of the rectangular quilts makes for some pretty sparse coverage around your arms and shoulders. Technically, I could use a Te-Wa as a TQ as well, but it would make for either a chilly torso or chilly toes.
    If it's a DIY project, you can always make the differential cut as wide as you like. In which case it could work as a TQ or an UQ.
    None of these issues seem to be in any way connected to the differential cut. The te-wa being a partial underquilt doesn't make differential quilts too short to use as top quilts, it makes partial quilts too short. You're lumping perceived issues with specific quilts under the banner of all differential quilts. The differential has nothing to do with it.

  2. #32
    New Member Nova12's Avatar
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    I'm making a climashield uq 46"w and 72"l. What should my differential cut be?

  3. #33
    WV's Avatar
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    Yes to flat quilts

    Here's an example where experience outweighs thought. I bought a No Sniveller because I liked the added function of a wearable quilt, and the price was right (bought it from another HF member). I tried it as an underquilt, and it worked fine! It performed better than some of my early attempts at DIY differential cut quilts. Some years later I won a Nest at MAHHA. I chose it partially because it fits a bottom-entry Hennessy (another often-criticized design that actually has a lot of merit). I've used it also as a supplemental UQ to turn a 3-season insulated hammock into a winter hammock. It works well, like the No Sniveller.

    I think the ability of down to fill available spaces makes flat underquilts perfectly workable, but that's something I've learned accidentally, from experience. The thinker and tinkerer in me gravitates toward engineered solutions. And some of my synthetic engineered UQ solutions gravitated toward the ground - that is, despite being somewhat shaped to fit the hammock they were too heavy to suspend easily. Note: all underquilts are only somewhat shaped to fit. One's backside is a moving target.

    That said, would I pass up a fine contoured UQ at a MAHHA raffle? Nope.
    Would I encourage a DIY newbie to make a differential underquilt? Nope.
    Have I gone on long enough? Yup.
    Last edited by WV; 02-27-2013 at 11:29.

  4. #34
    Senior Member lazy river road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WV View Post
    Here's an example where experience outweighs thought. I bought a No Sniveller because I liked the added function of a wearable quilt, and the price was right (bought it from another HF member). I tried it as an underquilt, and it worked fine! It performed better than some of my early attempts at DIY differential cut quilts. Some years later I won a Nest at MAHHA. I chose it partially because it fits a bottom-entry Hennessy (another often-criticized design that actually has a lot of merit). I've used it also as a supplemental UQ to turn a 3-season insulated hammock into a winter hammock. It works well, like the No Sniveller.

    I think the ability of down to fill available spaces makes flat underquilts perfectly workable, but that's something I've learned accidentally, from experience. The thinker and tinkerer in me gravitates toward engineered solutions. And some of my synthetic engineered UQ solutions gravitated toward the ground - that is, despite being somewhat shaped to fit the hammock they were too heavy to suspend easily. Note: all underquilts are only somewhat shaped to fit. Your butt is a moving target.

    That said, would I pass up a fine contoured UQ at a MAHHA raffle? Nope.
    Would I encourage a DIY newbie to make a differential underquilt? Nope.
    Have I gone on long enough? Yup.
    Very interesting post WV, a few questions however. Because down fills spaces does that mean an UQ that is not differentially cut will provide more warmth (assuming you do not compress the down) then a Differentially Cut UQ because it will find a way to fill in cold spaces. Where as an UQ that is differentially cut you can not compress the down however the down is not allowed to fill in any gaps. Does this logic make sense. So then, were differentially cut UQ were created to make the use of UQ easier and prevent the user from compressing the down, a non differentially cut UQ you run the risk of compressing down however it will also fill in more air gaps then a flat UQ. Am I understanding correctly, you certainly gave me a new perspective on UQ's.
    Sometimes I like to hike and think, And sometimes I just like to hike.

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  5. #35
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Differential cuts come into their own when protection below 30* is important...At 30 * and above traditional flat quilts work fine, are easier to make and cost less. Also this approach readily supports multifunctional designs as well. Please re-read WV posts on the value of flat quilts in use, for testimony on this point.

    Moreover, the differential cut is only half the design multiplier... The real benefit comed from body contouring radial baffles...Differentially designed UQ with straight or straight baffles with trimmed ends only do not perform as well as differential cuts that incorporate this second feature. Again thes designs are most valuable when planned for colder weather.

    Pan

    PS added back in the days of the original Differential Designed UQs...The Speer Snug fit (no longer made) and the JRB Mt Washington 4 UQ, it is worth noting the Mt Washinton UQs were designed fisrt with the zero degree capability to optimize the value of cost to use... Only later were the Mt washinton 3s and eventually the fractional Mt Washington design paralleled Greylck UQs.
    Last edited by Peter_pan; 02-27-2013 at 10:42.
    Ounces to Grams.

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  6. #36
    WV's Avatar
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    Thread-killers of the world, unite! (Under my leadership.)

    Quote Originally Posted by lazy river road View Post
    Does that mean an UQ that is not differentially cut will provide more warmth than a Differentially Cut UQ?
    I don't think so, LRR. The down in a differential cut UQ will also find a way to fill in cold spaces, and there will be gaps that need filling, but they may be smaller.
    Quote Originally Posted by lazy river road View Post
    An UQ that is differentially cut won't compress the down, however the down doesn't fill in any gaps. Does this logic make sense?
    Your logic is fine, but the facts you're basing it on are incomplete. My point is that both types of quilt design allow the down to shift and fill air gaps, and both types run the risk of losing efficiency because of compressed down. The differential cut does probably handle both sources of heat loss better than the flat quilt. However, I think flat quilts are better than many people say they are, and differentially cut quilts are far from perfect.

    You have certainly pinpointed the two aspects of UQ design that people need to think about in choosing and using bottom insulation. Warms my heart (or some other part).

    By the way, forgive me for heavy-handed editing in your quotes. I've tried to get the sense of what you offered, but I know I left some details out.

    Pan, thanks for reminding me about the differences in much colder temperatures. Sometimes what is "true" or what "works" in one situation (temperature) can seem hopelessly naive in another one. I have the same problem with rain and wind - there are varying degrees of each.

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