Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,628
    Images
    564

    Question for the sewers : dual feed / walking foot

    I've a question for this talented bunch of DIY sewers...

    On the recommendation of sites like this, and occasional chance comments here in the forum, I got a "walking foot" (a.k.a. dual feed) for the sewing machine. Here's the question...is there any reason to not use it when doing some tasks that don't involve nylon-on-nylon, e.g., putting bias tape along an edge? Looking for the voices of experience here with respect to any downside of the gadget.

    Tonight I plan to sew webbing and hamock body for the "cable" supports of my bridge hammock version 0.1, and don't know if the walking foot will be a help or hindrance. I will surely try some scrap lengths first.

    thanks
    Grizz

  2. #2
    Senior Member schrochem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Austin,Tx
    Posts
    796
    Images
    57
    I use a walking foot quite a bit.
    I definitely use it when there is nylon to nylon involved. It really keeps the pieces together so when you reach the end both pieces are the same length )

    Other times it's just easier to have a regular or smaller foot on there to maneuver around and see what you are doing.

    For adding the webbing on the fabric like that, I would probably use the walking foot.



    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    I've a question for this talented bunch of DIY sewers...

    On the recommendation of sites like this, and occasional chance comments here in the forum, I got a "walking foot" (a.k.a. dual feed) for the sewing machine. Here's the question...is there any reason to not use it when doing some tasks that don't involve nylon-on-nylon, e.g., putting bias tape along an edge? Looking for the voices of experience here with respect to any downside of the gadget.

    Tonight I plan to sew webbing and hamock body for the "cable" supports of my bridge hammock version 0.1, and don't know if the walking foot will be a help or hindrance. I will surely try some scrap lengths first.

    thanks
    Grizz
    Scott

    "Man is a stream whose source is hidden."
    RWE

  3. #3
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    Custom OES tarp
    Insulation
    JRB Down UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie slings
    Posts
    9,041
    Images
    40
    If I'm a sewer, is what I sew called sewage?


    Sewage \Sew"age\, n.

    1. The contents of a sewer or drain; refuse liquids or matter carried off by sewers


    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
    - Mark Twain
    I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.
    - John Burroughs

  4. #4
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,628
    Images
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by NCPatrick View Post
    If I'm a sewer, is what I sew called sewage?


    Sewage \Sew"age\, n.

    1. The contents of a sewer or drain; refuse liquids or matter carried off by sewers
    Had my first DIY nylon bag come apart at the seams this a.m., dumping my toiletries on the floor! Guess that sewing job might be called sewage. After consultation with my wife I learned that even when using bias tape one needs to fold over the edge of the fabric. I had just capped the two edges I wanted to join (of my $1 bin nylon) with bias tape and sewed through that, trusting that the seam would hold it. It didn't : the fabric frayed away from the thread.

    A mighty good lesson to learn before I use bias tape on my DIY hammock.

    Grizz (the sanitation engineer?)
    Last edited by GrizzlyAdams; 08-01-2007 at 14:57.

  5. #5
    Senior Member gstepclassical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Apex, NC
    Hammock
    HH Exped Asym
    Tarp
    DIY Sil
    Insulation
    KickAss UQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    156
    Images
    24
    I have one and have used it on a couple occasions. It was most useful when sewing multiple layers together such as my UQ. I had five layers all told on my last one and it worked fine. I did not use it for my sil tarps. The foot is very bulky and very noisy so I limit it to things that require it.
    When it goes over their heads, it really doesn't matter how high it is.

  6. #6
    Senior Member TeeDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY 10'x11'
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,631
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    Had my first DIY nylon bag come apart at the seams this a.m., dumping my toiletries on the floor! Guess that sewing job might be called sewage. After consultation with my wife I learned that even when using bias tape one needs to fold over the edge of the fabric. I had just capped the two edges I wanted to join (of my $1 bin nylon) with bias tape and sewed through that, trusting that the seam would hold it. It didn't : the fabric frayed away from the thread.

    A mighty good lesson to learn before I use bias tape on my DIY hammock.

    Grizz (the sanitation engineer?)
    Grizz - if you don't use one of those binder attachments to sew the bias tape, you can sew the bias tape and hem at the same time:



    In step 1, just make sure that the edge of the fabric is past the middle of the double fold bias tape and not quite to the opposite edge of the bias tape.

    As you execute step 2, folding the bias tape and stitching, open the opposite side of the bias tape and make sure the fabric lies under the fold and stitch as shown. You can stitch on either side of the first stitching and not just on the side I have illustrated.

    The hem is captured in the bias tape as you sew both.

    This, of course, assumes you are using double fold bias tape.

    Also, this method gets easier as the width of the bias tape increases.

    You end with a strong edge and a more professional appearance.

  7. #7
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,628
    Images
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by TeeDee View Post
    Grizz - if you don't use one of those binder attachments to sew the bias tape, you can sew the bias tape and hem at the same time:
    Thanks TeeDee. You're getting good at this OpenOffice presentation stuff.
    Pictures always help.

    Grizz

  8. #8
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,628
    Images
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by schrochem View Post
    For adding the webbing on the fabric like that, I would probably use the walking foot.
    Did my webbing tonight. Utility of the walking foot confirmed. When I did this for version 0.0 I had to try with both hands to keep the feed straight and the material from bunching up and getting under the needle....a little bit more of a challenge on the curve. With the walking foot I needed a whole lot less attention to the feed.

    Grizz

  9. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    B'Ham, Al.
    Posts
    15
    I use my walking foot only when dealing with SilNnylon or similar materials, but that doesn't mean it can't be used whenever you think it would be beneficial.

    Besides Hammocks, my main sewing is gear and trying to fit 3-4 layers of Cardura with under my walking foot is tough. However, most heavy duty machines come with a walking foot for just the reason you mentioned...requires less effort of the operator to complete the task.

    Also, if you have not tried one yet, a hemming foot makes the job of hemming free edges very easy.

    Best
    Spoon

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •