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  1. #1
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    Summer sleep system

    After acquiring a Mt. Washington 4 UQ this last fall and using it all winter I'm beginning to find it's getting to hot out for that heavy of a UQ, not to mention my 15 degree bag. So I've been searching for a light weight summer system and have all but decided on this.
    1. Gossamer gear 1/4'' pad cut to fit the pad sleeve of my bridge hammock. Estimated weight 4-5oz http://www.gossamergear.com/cgi-bin/...thinlight.html
    2. For the top side I'll use a silk bag liner. http://www.rei.com/product/735819 weighing about 4oz.

    If it's hot enough out I will leave the pad at home, if It gets a bit cooler I will take a heatsheet http://www.rei.com/product/750944 which weighs 3.8 oz. This means y summer sleep system will weigh somewhere between 4-13 oz.

    Any feedback from the pro's? What do you do to beat the summers heat?

  2. #2
    Senior Member chiefams's Avatar
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    Assuming you are using this system with your BMBH as listed in profile, I would look at the Jacks torso pad. It is only $10 and is made to fit in your hammock, 6.5 oz. pretty sweet deal
    Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith (Hebrews 12:2)

  3. #3
    Senior Member drewboy's Avatar
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    I'm thinking that a down underquilt would be a lot more comfortable than a ccf pad for warmer weather due to the much better breathability and also the ability to adjust the venting. You might spend a few more ounces (and dollars) on a 2/3 underquilt, but I'm thinking it would be worth it for me. I know of a local vendor who might even make you an even lighter custom one that is designed for warmer weather only.

    But if cost is a primary consideration, the ccf is hard to beat, especially since you have the integrated pad sleeve already.

  4. #4
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    I've had the same questions recently. I don't think the silk liner will be warm enough unless it is above 75 degrees (guessing). The bivy is interesting though with it and I am tempted to try it as well. I wonder how that breathes though.

    I use a 10 year old rei 55 degree bag that is about the size of a softball, synthetic and cost me about 55 dollars too. I saw that inflation has brought the price to 60 dollars. Tuthfully...it is not warm enough for 55 degrees, but it is what I use in late spring, and summer before I get to the point where I am sleeping on top of things rather than in them due to the heat. I saw REI has a down one about the same size rated to 40 degrees that cost about 100 dollars that seems about the same size as your emergency bivy. Seems to me once again that this one is not really a 40 degree bag but should work great for warm temps when you just need something light to not ruin a cool night. Packs to about the size of a softball too and can't weigh a pound but I'm not really sure.



    I am interested to see what other people use. This has been somthing I've been thinking about for a while too.

    I used to just use a very thin old towel in the middle of summer since I usually camped where I could swim and found 2 uses for a towel that way.

    cooldays

  5. #5
    myles to go's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooldays View Post


    I am interested to see what other people use. This has been somthing I've been thinking about for a while too.



    cooldays
    I have gone the DIY route and made my self a TQ and a UQ made from two 45 sleeping bags that I picked up for a steal. With some modification to these bags they worked and fit great. The two of these together weight 2lbs 14oz and compress down quite small. I use a 1/8 GG thin pad between my UQ and hammock for a little extra warmth and that weights in at about 2 oz. I have tried this set up in the cold to see what the limites would be. I got down to 25 f and it just got to cold and i had to bail but I think that it will work great in the cool summer nights.

  6. #6
    Banned
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    most of the time in the summer i don't use anything below me. occasionally a little 20x24 ccf pad. this is summer in PA, mind you

  7. #7
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asimmons4 View Post
    Assuming you are using this system with your BMBH as listed in profile, I would look at the Jacks torso pad. It is only $10 and is made to fit in your hammock, 6.5 oz. pretty sweet deal
    I'll have to check that out. I was on their site the other night looking for a solution. All their quilts are to warm for summer time temps here. I must have overlooked the torso pad

    Quote Originally Posted by drewboy View Post
    I'm thinking that a down underquilt would be a lot more comfortable than a ccf pad for warmer weather due to the much better breathability and also the ability to adjust the venting. You might spend a few more ounces (and dollars) on a 2/3 underquilt, but I'm thinking it would be worth it for me. I know of a local vendor who might even make you an even lighter custom one that is designed for warmer weather only.

    But if cost is a primary consideration, the ccf is hard to beat, especially since you have the integrated pad sleeve already.
    Your probably right. The pad and heatsheet would make for a sticky night. What have you guys been using in the summer? It seems like even the higher elevations stay pretty warm at night. Are you coming to the Az hang at the end of April?

    Quote Originally Posted by cooldays View Post
    I've had the same questions recently. I don't think the silk liner will be warm enough unless it is above 75 degrees (guessing). The bivy is interesting though with it and I am tempted to try it as well. I wonder how that breathes though.

    I use a 10 year old rei 55 degree bag that is about the size of a softball, synthetic and cost me about 55 dollars too. I saw that inflation has brought the price to 60 dollars. Tuthfully...it is not warm enough for 55 degrees, but it is what I use in late spring, and summer before I get to the point where I am sleeping on top of things rather than in them due to the heat. I saw REI has a down one about the same size rated to 40 degrees that cost about 100 dollars that seems about the same size as your emergency bivy. Seems to me once again that this one is not really a 40 degree bag but should work great for warm temps when you just need something light to not ruin a cool night. Packs to about the size of a softball too and can't weigh a pound but I'm not really sure.



    I am interested to see what other people use. This has been somthing I've been thinking about for a while too.

    I used to just use a very thin old towel in the middle of summer since I usually camped where I could swim and found 2 uses for a towel that way.

    cooldays
    I was thinking the silk might take me down to 65ish which is pretty cool for summer time temps around here.

    Quote Originally Posted by swoosh View Post
    most of the time in the summer i don't use anything below me. occasionally a little 20x24 ccf pad. this is summer in PA, mind you
    Yes, the pad would be more of a late spring/early fall solution. I would not need anything under me in the dead of summer

  8. #8
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    Well down in the swamps of good ole louisiana I bring a battery operated fan with me and hang it from my ridge line.As far as TQ and UQ they don't exist from now till mid october

  9. #9
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
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    I use a JRB Shenandoah til about 55F as a TC then I switch to a super light Eureka 60F biker sleeping bag. I used to uses a Thermarest in the pad pocket with good results but I switched it out last winter (during the "Jack's Valentine's sale"), to a Mount Washington 3 Convertible (MW3C) so this summer I'm using it in 2/3 UQ mode, instead of the pad.

    During the same sale I bought a Rocky Mountain sniveler. When I use that as a TQ and my MW3C deployed in full mode as an UQ I can easily get to 20F. I think with a proper winter tarp and also supplementing with my pad I should be able to go from summer to -0F, with just these three quilts ,a small sleeping bag and a pad.

  10. #10
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooldays View Post
    I am interested to see what other people use. This has been somthing I've been thinking about for a while too.
    I've made a thin climashield UQ w/DWR nylon on both sides. Weight about 12 oz. Most of my summer camping is in humid hot temps and I wanted to keep out as much moisture as I could. Quilt takes a bit longer to pack inside my backpack as it doesn't want to let out all the air. But it does pack up.

    My top quilt is also DWR nylon on both sides with down inside. It also weights about 12 oz. 1" baffles and thin silk sewed to the side that's touching me. Again, DWR because of the humidity but silk because it will feel clamy on your skin.

    When it gets really hot I leave the top quilt home and just pack a piece of silk to cover up with. I always pack the UQ. I've found that even on the hottest nights, if fog rolls in or I'm next to a river, I get chilled and need it. If I'm to hot with it, I just keep it attached to my hammock on one side and will slip it under me during the night if needed.

    My hammock has a weathershield and that's also used as part of my sleep system during the summer. I've found that sometimes, the temps will drop a few degrees more than I expected and if I've only packed my UQ and silk sheet that I need more. Closing the weathershield then has kept me at the just right temps to sleep very comfortably.

    And someone else mentioned a fan, yep... got one of those too!! I don't use one so much at night. But hanging out during a hot hazy afternoon, a fan is like heaven

    TinaLouise

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