Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34
  1. #21
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Hammock
    Varies
    Tarp
    GargoyleGear Ogee
    Insulation
    UQ-varies w/season
    Suspension
    onrope buckle
    Posts
    5,982
    Quote Originally Posted by ikemouser View Post
    Are your socks too tight?
    Good point.

    Any constriction is too much, especially if your feet run cold, anyway.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
    John Steinbeck

  2. #22
    Senior Member JohnSawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Hammock
    WB RidgeRunner
    Tarp
    8x10 DIY (speer)
    Insulation
    KAQ Lost River
    Suspension
    Straps
    Posts
    4,696
    Images
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim S View Post
    John
    If I understand right you used an underquilt as a top cover and some thin insulation under your feet and socks.

    1) Increase the insulation under your feet with a foam pad.
    2) If the blood getting to your legs isn't warm (cold legs), your feet can't get warm.
    3) If the hammock compresses the insulation around your feet, they won't get warm.
    4) too thick of socks may keep your feet from keeping each other warm.
    5) I mostly never wear socks in a sleeping bag and I never get cold feet.

    An observation. I sleep in sleeping bags, and they have a "footsack" designed for toes to stick up with out pushing into the insulation. Just maybe a quilt doesn't surround your feet with insulation the way a sleeping bag does. Have you tried using a sleeping bag over you as a quilt with your feet in a proper foot sack?

    Jim S
    I am using my sleeping bag as a top quilt. To keep my feet and legs warm, I pinned the zipper in place just above my knees. It's possible I was pushing my feet against the bottom and compressing it.. It's hard to say.

    Pan: My feet were slightly elevated... just enough to keep me from sliding down to the foot end... You're right: I probably need a longer hammock for a flatter lay...

    I'll keep experimenting... Thanks all for the suggestions!

  3. #23
    Senior Member ikemouser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    ky
    Hammock
    WarBonnet BB 1.1 DBL
    Tarp
    Maccat Deluxe Spin
    Insulation
    JRB No Sniv + Yeti
    Suspension
    Whoppie Slingin'
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by OrionFyre View Post
    Not that it helps in the immediate sense (or any sense what-so-ever)... and is purely anecdotal....

    I used to get cold feet all the time. It could be 90 degrees outside and i'd still wake up with my feet cold.

    Once I started walking and running barefoot and my feet got stronger, no more cold feet! In fact when winter was ending here even when there was still slush on the ground I was going out for 1 mile runs in the afternoon tromping through the slush and snow barefoot with only a slight twinge of "cold!" got a few wierd looks and people gave me a wide berth LMAO.

    And even if you do lots of walking and hiking your feet can be even weaker than someone who barely does any exercise because of all the arch and ankle support your hiking gear has....
    Which is why i like inov-8, less support.

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    141
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by ikemouser View Post
    Which is why i like inov-8, less support.
    less is the key word.

    I am quite the ardent barefoot proponent. Speaking from my personal experience of course... Once you get a feel for walking and running barefoot, then ANY amount of cushioning or support or constriction really starts to get annoying. I even gave away an expensive pair of hiking boots because the arch support actually inflamed a case of plantar troubles to the point I couldn't walk for a day, and I only wore them for an hour!!

    I do believe that anyone with "cold foot syndrome" should consider barefoot and minimalist footwear to help strengthen and stress the muscles in the feet. When these muscles and tissues are being subjected to the rigors of supporting your body all by themselves like they are designed to it will encourage increased blood flow which in turn means warmer feet. I used to get complaints from those sharing my bed about my freezing feet. Now even on the coldest nights they're toasty warm. Not only will it help with circulation, stronger feet (the tissues, muscle and bone) will last you much longer on the trail with fewer complaints.

  5. #25
    Senior Member ikemouser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    ky
    Hammock
    WarBonnet BB 1.1 DBL
    Tarp
    Maccat Deluxe Spin
    Insulation
    JRB No Sniv + Yeti
    Suspension
    Whoppie Slingin'
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by OrionFyre View Post
    less is the key word.

    I am quite the ardent barefoot proponent. Speaking from my personal experience of course... Once you get a feel for walking and running barefoot, then ANY amount of cushioning or support or constriction really starts to get annoying. I even gave away an expensive pair of hiking boots because the arch support actually inflamed a case of plantar troubles to the point I couldn't walk for a day, and I only wore them for an hour!!

    I do believe that anyone with "cold foot syndrome" should consider barefoot and minimalist footwear to help strengthen and stress the muscles in the feet. When these muscles and tissues are being subjected to the rigors of supporting your body all by themselves like they are designed to it will encourage increased blood flow which in turn means warmer feet. I used to get complaints from those sharing my bed about my freezing feet. Now even on the coldest nights they're toasty warm. Not only will it help with circulation, stronger feet (the tissues, muscle and bone) will last you much longer on the trail with fewer complaints.
    Barefoot is cool, but how can you go barefoot on jagged terrain, scattered sharp rocks, like in a creek bed? You would get all kinds of abrasion, not to mention poison ivy/oak/sumac, snake bites, etc.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Kallorne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Spokane, Wa
    Hammock
    Dangerbird, Snipe, DIY Poly, HH
    Tarp
    OES, WB
    Insulation
    HG All the way!
    Suspension
    Whoopsies
    Posts
    349
    Images
    13
    "don't ask yourself what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go and do that because what the world needs is people who have come alive."

  7. #27
    Senior Member JohnSawyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Hammock
    WB RidgeRunner
    Tarp
    8x10 DIY (speer)
    Insulation
    KAQ Lost River
    Suspension
    Straps
    Posts
    4,696
    Images
    108
    Starting with Pan's advice for a longer hammock for a flatter lay...

    I pulled out 11'4" of fabric, hemmed it all around, cinched up the ends WBBB style, and hung it. (somehow this hammock took me 1/3rd the time of the first... I must be getting used to my thread injector -- Thanks to Ramblin Rev for the video lessons!)

    It barely fits my folding hammock stand and my ridgeline is 30" above me, where my first was a bit claustrophobic with an overcover.

    And along with the myriad of comments on me being too warm, sweaty, and too cold, I hung in the new hammock with my lost river UQ, my sleeping bag as a top quilt (with the zipper pinned up to enclose my legs.) wearing nothing more than a t-shirt and shorts.

    It took some fiddling to get my UQ set right, but I was immediately comfortable, and reasonably warm. My feet felt cold, but when I reached down, I found they really weren't... I just perceived they were...

    I'll try again this weekend, but an hour and a half nap in the new hammock was a big improvement.

    The only problem I had is my feet still had a tendancy to slip over the edge of the hammock, which is why I sewed a triangle on the end of #1... I might just have to do this to #2...

    Darn, someday I might be like Tinker (Jerry..) Isn't he up to 6 DIY hammocks? I love his latest creation.

    Ugh... I might just give up and buy that WBBB I've always wanted...

    More to come..

    Thanks everybody!

  8. #28
    HappyCamper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WV
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BB, 1.1 single
    Tarp
    JRB11x10 Z-P cuben
    Insulation
    Yeti JRB WestMtg
    Suspension
    webbing, Dutchclip
    Posts
    3,523
    Images
    47
    How wide is your new hammock? Great that you keep experimenting. You'll get there!
    I intend to live forever, or die trying. -- Groucho Marx (1890 - 1977)

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    141
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by ikemouser View Post
    Barefoot is cool, but how can you go barefoot on jagged terrain, scattered sharp rocks, like in a creek bed? You would get all kinds of abrasion, not to mention poison ivy/oak/sumac, snake bites, etc.
    I know it sounds crazy (or I do at least) But your feet can put up with a LOT of abuse when they're strong. I'm not svelt buy any stretch of the imagination but I'm able to run right over crushed limestone paths without a complaint. sharp and pointy rocks are fun to walk across.

    The skin on the bottom of your foot is said to be 6 times more puncture resistant than any other flesh on your body. And us dedicated barefooters probably even more Plus walking on sharp stuff isn't all that challenging anyways. Just put your foot down and lift straight up.

    And as Kallorne posted, Vibram Five Fingers are absolutely amazing if you're worried about punctures or cuts. For poison ivy... just... walk around it like you would dog poo

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Waynesboro, VA
    Hammock
    DIY bridge, Pertex "Grackle"
    Tarp
    DIY 10x11
    Insulation
    DIY this-n-that
    Suspension
    Whoopie/M-spike
    Posts
    631
    Images
    2
    For the cold foot problem, 45 degrees isn't too warm to give plastic bags under your socks a try. I know some people that disagree, but I find that cold feet at almost any temperature can be mitigated by a vapor barrier. It's free to try.

    I'm on the barefoot bandwagon now too. I haven't had much cold weather camping experience since I started running barefoot; now I'm curious to try it. There are a million other reasons why it's awesome though.
    .. truly to enjoy bodily warmth, some small part of you must be cold, for there is no quality in this world that is not what it is merely by contrast. Nothing exists in itself. If you flatter yourself that you are all over comfortable, and have been so a long time, then you cannot be said to be comfortable any more. - Herman Melville

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •