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  1. #81
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    A water knot for making a loop is basically the same thing as tying an overhand on a bight. The only difference is, you are able to feed the free end around something (like a ring) first, and it's a bit easier to dress. You could just as easily pass the webbing through the loop first, and then tie an overhand on a bight by passing the ring through the knot (I hope that makes sense). If you want to do it like you're making a water knot, just tie one half of the water knot with a longer-than-usual tail, then feed the tail through the ring, and fold the tail back over itself and use it to tie the rest of the knot, just like you would if it were a different piece of webbing.

  2. #82
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    I know we are talking mostly about webbing here but I wanted to add that a water knot in Amsteel Blue is not a stable knot from my experience. I have always put great trust in the water knot but I will not use it in amsteel. I have been dumped to the ground too many times to believe I tied it wrong. The knot just doesn't hold.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  3. #83
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    A water knot shouldn't really ever be used to join anything except webbing. There are far better ways to join two ropes, such as a figure eight or double fisherman's. A flat overhand, which has both tails coming out the same side, rather than one out each side like in a water knot, can be used for joining two ropes for rappelling, but it is a hotly contested combination, as the knot is known to roll under load, and the tails must be left long enough to prevent the knot from rolling until it's undone. The only advantage to this combo is that the knot is less likely to snag when pulling the rope down, which is really not an issue with hammocking. So stick to the figure eights and fisherman's for your hammocks.

  4. #84
    New Member mgabel_pi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustardman View Post
    A water knot for making a loop is basically the same thing as tying an overhand on a bight. The only difference is, you are able to feed the free end around something (like a ring) first, and it's a bit easier to dress. You could just as easily pass the webbing through the loop first, and then tie an overhand on a bight by passing the ring through the knot (I hope that makes sense). If you want to do it like you're making a water knot, just tie one half of the water knot with a longer-than-usual tail, then feed the tail through the ring, and fold the tail back over itself and use it to tie the rest of the knot, just like you would if it were a different piece of webbing.
    Thanks. [I think you meant "ring through the loop" not "webbing through the loop" in the "just as easily" sentence. As least it would then make sense to me. ]

    A simple overhand knot on a bight does not hold at all with my webbing. If I use a longer free end after tying this and "lock" it by sort of rethreading back through the water knot, that does seem to work. I'd not like to be making up knots though, of course.

  5. #85
    New Member mgabel_pi's Avatar
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    My "final" configuration for a tree hugger

    I think I should stop playing, but here is my "final" version: Double rings in a locked girth hitch (so that a garda can be used) and a loop made with a locked overhand on a bight (a water knot loop). On the locked girth the load end is the last wrap so that a load tightens the whole knot down. I did not do the locked water knot that way. I'm now thinking I'll do that. But, I think I ought to wait until my hammock arrives (in like a week).
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #86
    Senior Member Albert Skye's Avatar
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    Exclamation garda hitch warning

    The garda hitch is clearly stressful to rope. It is simple and easy, but I would not consider it to be lightweight (because the rope must be stronger/heavier to cope with it, and it requires hardware). I've seen several reports of failure due to the garda hitch on these forums, and I post this to warn those who might consider using it.

    In general, for a given rope, the tighter the bend (curvature) and the smaller the contact area, the weaker the attachment.

  7. #87
    Senior Member
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    Garda Hitch

    On the WB BlackBird with line set up using rings and Garda hitch the Amsteel Blue getting flattened by the rings had me concerned. So back to simple and quick (slipped buntline). Some problems have occured using the Garda Hitch even on lines with braided casing such as Spyderline. The other name for a Garda Hitch is the "Alpine Clutch". The hitches origin (I think) was to move items in one direction. Maybe holding a heavy static load is not an appropriate use for this hitch?
    Noel V.

  8. #88
    Senior Member ikemouser's Avatar
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    Hey i know little about knots and less about hammocks. Anyway, i like the ideas, especially the initial posters, seeing as much of the weight is in the straps on the Warbonnet BB. If you guys get this figured out, make a picture guide step by step for those of us still learning, and sticky it, because if this works its a significant weight reduction.

  9. #89
    Senior Member leroybrown's Avatar
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    Bump??


    Is anyone using this?

    I'm not a fan of Whoopies. I'm just not... sorry. I have made my own and i just LOVE the ring buckle system with straps. Soooo simple. I'd like to use rope instead to save on SOME weight.

    I am willing to trade some weight for simplicity. 1/2 pound more and not worry about the way the amsteel stretches where the burrow exits would be worth it to me. Thoughts?

  10. #90
    Senior Member Trooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leroybrown View Post
    Bump??


    Is anyone using this?

    I'm not a fan of Whoopies. I'm just not... sorry. I have made my own and i just LOVE the ring buckle system with straps. Soooo simple. I'd like to use rope instead to save on SOME weight.

    I am willing to trade some weight for simplicity. 1/2 pound more and not worry about the way the amsteel stretches where the burrow exits would be worth it to me. Thoughts?
    I've got a sliding ring on my Hennessy, which works great. Grizz's videos show how it works, and while my setup is slightly different, the concept is the same.

    One ring on each side adds 26 grams and uses the stock suspension from Hennessy. Loop the cord through the ring three times and put the ring as close to the hammock as possible. Run the cord to the tree hugger and back to the ring. Attach the cord to the ring with a hitch, and make sure the suspension is tight; no 30 angles here. Now, slide the ring to loosen the suspension for comfort. The ring will stay in place because of the friction, if not, then loop the cord through one more time.

    Regarding Amsteel, I don't think there should be any stretch.

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