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  1. #1
    Senior Member RTR's Avatar
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    Adventure Medical Kits Bivvy

    Ok testing some things in preparation for a Thru for next year and am looking into using a Bivvy/Quilt Liner for added warmth on those few nights that drop, instead of purchasing a larger TQ or OQ. Does anyone feel that you could use one of Adventure Medical Kits Bivvys as a solid reusable Bivvy for the Thru. Having one sitting in a bump box if necessary is a total option as well.. I made a simple fleece quilt out of a very light weight blanket I got from a company giveaway. No-frill just made a cinch-able foot box and added two tabs of velcro for making the foot box a bit larger. Not sure of the weight but I would think more than this or this. If anyone has any information let me know.

    As a side note the Fleece quilt works well down to 38deg inside my JRB Shenandoah TQ with minimal clothing, but the lack of compression is whats killing me.
    Last edited by RTR; 04-06-2010 at 12:48.

  2. #2
    Knotty's Avatar
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    Don't know the Adventure Medical bivy, but this review of another bivy by Arson may help.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14102
    Knotty
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  3. #3
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    I posted this as another thread recently:

    Quote Originally Posted by cooldays View Post
    I tried to use this instead of a sleeping bag to see how warm it keeps you.

    This post was prompted by roadtorques suggestion of what to use as insulation in the summer.

    Road torque mentioned the idea of using just a silk bag liner and carrying the bivvy for emergencies. I tried this combination out but since it is not summer (it was 44 degrees) I thought should start a new thread rather than hijack the other one which I still hope gives more ideas of light summer top insulation ideas.

    In any case, I was doubtful that it would work. I used my hudson river as bottom insulation and first just tried the silk liner alone....not a chance!

    So I added the Adventure medical kits thermolite 2 bivvy and then fell asleep promptly. It was 46 when i fell asleep and 44 when I awoke. I was warm. I did not want to get up. I forced myself because I wanted to compare it my REI 55 degree rated bag that I usually use in summer. I noticed when I took off the bivvy and the silk that I was actually sweating on my legs. This of course made me immediately cold as well. THe REI sack did not warm me up....it might have but I had no patience so I added the silk right away. I still did not warm up quickly so I replaced the bivvy as a top cover (not getting in or even tucking it around me just loosely laying across the top of the travel sack) temporarily thinking I will remove it once I'm warm and see if I stay warm at that point but...i fell asleep again hehe.

    silk liner weight 4 5/8 0z 55 dollars size of of frozen lemonade can

    thermolite bivy weight 7 1/4 oz I bought used for 15 dollars size of nalgene bottle

    rei 55 travel sack weight 1lb 10 1/2 oz paid 49 for it 10 years ago size of nerf football but compresses to sizer of softball

    so.....in terms of functional usage and low weight....I am now a believer that the key here was the thermolite bivvy even to the mid 40's.

    the travel sack is not worth its weight in functional usage it seems but it is comfortable and better built than the bivvy which seems is almost a limited use item in its almost disposable type construction.

    It seems much more effective per ounce than the silk but the silk helped and is comfortable and packs very small so it has a role.

    A good sleeping bag is more durable. You could probably use the thermolite till it shreds and then just buy a new one though and you don't have to worry about your down or expensive investment.

    Also about my legs sweating. I know that means I was warm which is great, with no bag and just a silk liner. I don't know what that means in terms of "breathability" of the bivvy, but I can tell you that when I use a bag that is overrated for the temp, I sweat in the past too, so I can't say this is a fault of the bag but could just be a sign of its effectiveness.

    Just some observations on an inexpensive piece of gear.....

    cooldays

  4. #4
    it's the same material as the yeti reflective liner, (possibly a lighter or heavier version), it should hold up to some use




    Quote Originally Posted by RTR View Post
    Ok testing some things in preparation for a Thru for next year and am looking into using a Bivvy/Quilt Liner for added warmth on those few nights that drop, instead of purchasing a larger TQ or OQ. Does anyone feel that you could use one of Adventure Medical Kits Bivvys as a solid reusable Bivvy for the Thru. Having one sitting in a bump box if necessary is a total option as well.. I made a simple fleece quilt out of a very light weight blanket I got from a company giveaway. No-frill just made a cinch-able foot box and added two tabs of velcro for making the foot box a bit larger. Not sure of the weight but I would think more than this or this. If anyone has any information let me know.

    As a side note the Fleece quilt works well down to 38deg inside my JRB Shenandoah TQ with minimal clothing, but the lack of compression is whats killing me.

  5. #5
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    This is a moderately old thread but I thought I would add my experience.

    Last November I tried out a S.O.L./TL2 during a road trip from Dallas to California. The first night was in the mid 20s, clear, and only slightly breezy (winds picked up in the early AM). I used a ground cloth, inflatable mattress, and the LT2. No tent, no tarp, no real windbreak. This was before I had ever seriously considered hammocks. The combo was good for about 4 hours sleep....but it was an honest 4 hours of sleep, not 4 hours of diminished consciousness.

    I was actually pretty impressed. I mean... sub freezing temperatures, just about zero protection, and I didn't die!

    Now for the relevant part: I was fairly gentle with it (no bare ground, no boots or watch, etc.) and after one night of use it was looking kinda worn down in places. I have used it a few more times since then and it doesn't look a lot worse but there is one tear clear through and the aluminum is gone in a few areas.

    I think it's a great bit of emergency gear. It's in my car kit now. I'm not sure I'd trust it to last 25 nights.

  6. #6
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    I am noticing the same just from use to test in a hammock. It is warm but not durable and will be great for emergencies or to bring in my day pack when you have no intention of camping "just in case".

  7. #7
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    There are two different AMK bivvies, one is small and thin and the other is thicker and heavier. I carry the smaller one as a emergency shelter when I go backcountry fly fishing. It'd be pretty easy to slip, break a leg and be stuck somewhere cold and wet. I figure it's cheap insurance.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mountainfitter's Avatar
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    As mentioned the AMK Bivy is light and warm but not so durable. I have one but prefer using a two person survival blanket since its more versatile.

    One more point worth mentioning is they are hard to get back in the included stuff sack.

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