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  1. #11
    Senior Member Bleemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustardman View Post
    People used to backpack with 15 pound tents. A 2.5 pound sleeping pad is hardly that terrible for anyone who isn't a gram weenie.
    The key part of this statement is "used to".

    I'm just saying.....
    Bleemus

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  2. #12
    New Member David@whiteblaze's Avatar
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    I don't really care how bad my back hurts when I get in at night, just how much it does when I get up in the morning.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    And I'm "just saying" that one person's idea of acceptable weight does not define every person's idea of the same, and to make broad overgeneralized statements about things like that is sort of arrogant. There are MANY people who backpack with a downmat - they are one of the warmest sleeping pads on the market, and also one of the most comfortable, without the condensation issues of CCF. 2.5 pounds can be a very smart tradeoff if you expect there is a chance you might need to go to ground.

    It's not right for everyone but some people are used to carrying non ultralight loads and it doesn't bother them. I usually have more than 2.5 pounds worth of knives with me, and a sleeping pad is probably getting more use than those.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustardman View Post
    And I'm "just saying" that one person's idea of acceptable weight does not define every person's idea of the same, and to make broad overgeneralized statements about things like that is sort of arrogant. There are MANY people who backpack with a downmat - they are one of the warmest sleeping pads on the market, and also one of the most comfortable, without the condensation issues of CCF. 2.5 pounds can be a very smart tradeoff if you expect there is a chance you might need to go to ground.

    It's not right for everyone but some people are used to carrying non ultralight loads and it doesn't bother them. I usually have more than 2.5 pounds worth of knives with me, and a sleeping pad is probably getting more use than those.
    My point is that when you hike long days for extended periods of time, you will not want to carry that pad.

    I'm not a gram weenie, we're talking about LBS. not OUNCES in this case. If you roll an UQ or CCF, you're looking at 6-12 ounces compared to 45 ounces for the Exped downmat. Plus it's for a hammock, so...............

    I saw many people last summer while thruing the AT swap anything and everything out to get lighter. People used to carry 15 lb tents, yes, but that's because there wasn't another option. Fortunately in 2010 we have other options.

    Earl Shaffer hiked the AT in '48 and carried a lighter backpack then most people carry today. Why do you think that is? You figure out quickly what is and what isn't necessary to carry. People don't carry lightweight stuff because they can't carry the heavier loads. They carry it because it's easier on your knees, back and every other part of your body. I don't carry UL stuff because I can go further, it's because I can get up in the morning after walking 20+ miles a day for extended periods of time and not have my body ache like the guy carrrying a 40-60 lb backpack. I went out for 3 days this past weekend and my pack was half the weight of my cohikers. Guess who was the only one with blisters, sore muscles and stiff backs?


    HYOH, hike smarter-not harder and whatever other cliche sayings people are using these days. Hiking with a ridiculously overweight pack doesn't make me a tough guy, it makes me stupid for putting strain on my body that shouldn't be there and exponentially increases the chances of getting hurt/ruining the hike.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by David@whiteblaze View Post
    I don't really care how bad my back hurts when I get in at night, just how much it does when I get up in the morning.

    You're talking about Yo Yoing a 7600 mile trail and you don't care about how much your back hurts? Best of luck to you

  6. #16
    Senior Member Bleemus's Avatar
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    It wasn't meant to be arrogant and if it sounded like that I apologize. For me it is all about the enjoyment of the outdoors and part of that means I have a pack light enough to almost not notice it but contains the essentials for a fun time. If you want to carry 100 knives enjoy.

    Modern equipment advances eliminate weight and increase comfort. I prefer to take advantage of those advances. Being sore or having a sore back is not something I feel I need to endure.

    When I sleep on the ground I use a Pacfic Outdoor Equipment Ether Thermo 6 2/3rds mat. At 15 ounces it is as warm as an Exped for me. Partially inflated I have stuck it in the pad pocket of my hammock as well. Almost too warm!
    Bleemus

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  7. #17
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Folks, let's not get too caught up in the 'use' of the gear while while discussing it's weight.

    Not everyone on this site is a long-distance hiker. Someone that paddles or car camps cares less about the weight than they might the bulk...

    There's all kinds of gear. People will choose what works best for their own application.
    I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt. - Cormac McCarthy

  8. #18
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Saint View Post
    My point is that when you hike long days for extended periods of time, you will not want to carry that pad.
    And my point is that there are many people who do exactly that.

    I wonder if you really understand what HYOH means, since you seem so intent on telling people that your way is the only way.

  9. #19
    New Member David@whiteblaze's Avatar
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    wow, I just wanted to know what kind of pad filling goes well with a hammock. If a just-underinflated thermarest works, then the controversy can end.what I meant about my back is that, with a 35# pack (food and water included) I end up stiff at the end of the day. If I sleep on the ground, I wake up stiff at the beginning of the day. so if I get a pad that will prevent that, I will carry an extra pound and eat instant mashed potatoes instead of squash every week.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustardman View Post
    And my point is that there are many people who do exactly that.

    I wonder if you really understand what HYOH means, since you seem so intent on telling people that your way is the only way.

    The hundreds of people I thruhiked/met on the AT didn't carry anything close to that, but we must not know what we're doing.

    David-If you really go through with that YoYo you're talking about, you'll figure out very quickly what you need and don't.

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