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Thread: stuff sacks

  1. #11
    New Member Porkbutter's Avatar
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    With one more line of stitching you can put a pull handle into the bottom of the design that headchange is referring to. If your interested I will try to post a pic this week.
    I sometimes just sew a loop of grosgrain ribbon in the center of the bottom seam. This gives a nice finger pull if you are removing something bulky, like a quilt or clothing. Put 2 loops, near where the corners will be, if making a bear bag for hanging. This gives a bit more strength so that you don't stress the silnylon.

    My kingdom for my butt in the woods

  2. #12
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    Arkwater,

    What's exactly is a "pull handle" and what is it used for?

    EDIT:

    I guess Porkbutter answered that.

  3. #13
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Yup...just stuff it.

    If you use a square bottom vs round the two triangular tabs can be placed on the outside with the corners tacked together so as to form the handle...no extra wght....A La, the JRB Compression Sack design.

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  4. #14
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    The ones I bought from seatosummit have the drybag closure. I hang them from that closure.

    Just I thought. If you are using a drawstring and hanging your bag upside down as a foodbag, you run the risk of loosing the contents if the closure fails. If you hang it the other way with the closure up, there is more of a chance of water getting in. The best of both worlds may be a dry bag closure hung upside down.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
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  5. #15
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    If I were hanging a drawstring foodbag upside down, I'd use the drawcord to tie a gooseneck. Otherwise, a good stiff wind may jiggle the food enough to open the cordlock, like you said.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  6. #16
    New Member Porkbutter's Avatar
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    Just I thought. If you are using a drawstring and hanging your bag upside down as a foodbag, you run the risk of loosing the contents if the closure fails.
    I often add a small flap of silnylon to the inside drawstring seam. This will make any sack a bit more rain resistant by covering the opening. It also diffuses the stress the contents of the bear bag causes while hanging upsidedown. I used to tie a simple knot it secure the cordlock, but I really don't find it necessary anymore.

    My kingdom for my butt in the woods

  7. #17
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    just food for thought... i`m mostly using an ursa sack now & not even hanging, but if i went back to hanging i would make a lighter version of the bag i was using. pictures in tips & techniques, under foodbag.
    the bag in the photo is an outdoor research (OR) advanced dry sack. if i remember correctly, it weighs about 4ozs. that`s why i would make one out of silnylon.
    the method works perfectly.
    i leave it hanging about chest high until i`m ready to go to bed (also in the morning). at that height & the angle of the bag it`s easy to look inside. nothing`s likely to fall out.
    even if i forget to close it, little if any rain will find it`s way inside w/ the mouth of the bag hanging down.
    when i give it a couple rolls & touch the velcro straps to the side, it`s completely waterproof. ...tim
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

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