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  1. #1
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    quick question...

    If i got ripstop fabric that was not coated with a silicone seal, is there some way I could do it myself, or would it matter? It would be for the hammock and the tarp. Thanks.

  2. #2
    most of the time, you want a breathable hammock. exception being in cold weather.

    you could get some silicone caulk and thin it with mineral spirits, and apply it to the fabric.

    maybe you could submerge the fabric in this concoction.

    i'm thinking it would need to be pretty thinned though.

    you can get silnylon seconds for 4-5$/yd from www.questoutfitters.com
    the silicone is impregnated into the individual fibers of the fabric. it's present on both sides, and will never wear off, and it is probably stronger, lighter, and better than anything you could do yourself, but it doesn't hurt to try.

    i am curious how soaking it in a very dilute silicone solution would work. seems like soaking it would produce much more consistent results than painting it on like you would do to seal a seam. you should do some small test batches to get the ratio of sil to thinner just right.

    the advantage would be it would be coated on both sides, as many coated fabrics are only coated on one side.



    Quote Originally Posted by skar578 View Post
    If i got ripstop fabric that was not coated with a silicone seal, is there some way I could do it myself, or would it matter? It would be for the hammock and the tarp. Thanks.

  3. #3
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    so the silnylons would work for the body, are they breathable?

    seattlefabrics.com/ says the 1.9 oz is breathable because it is uncoated.

    also is the 1.1 oz at quest strong enough for a hammock body? and where can I get strong enough rope?

  4. #4
    silnylon is not breathable, use it for a tarp, not the hammock. it's just like a coated fabric, but better b/c it won't wear off and is generally lighter than coated fabrics. sil weighs 1.3 oz/yd after the sil waterproofing is applied, which is pretty light.

    use a breathable fabric for the hammock body. such fabrics are uncoated. 1.1 may be strong enough depending on bodyweight, some have hammocks made out of it. 1.9 is still very light and is a bit more durable. i would recomend 1.9, it makes a great hammock.

    don't buy from seattlefabrics, unless you want to get ripped off. get the same stuff at lower prices from www.questoutfitters.com or www.owfinc.com or from www.speerhammocks.com or check out the bargain bin @ walmart (you have to be able to tell what you are looking at though, as walmart does not label this fabric) free samples can be obtained from owf and quest.

    Quote Originally Posted by skar578 View Post
    so the silnylons would work for the body, are they breathable?

    seattlefabrics.com/ says the 1.9 oz is breathable because it is uncoated.

    also is the 1.1 oz at quest strong enough for a hammock body? and where can I get strong enough rope?

  5. #5
    get 1" polyester webbing from owf and lightweight line (spectra/dyneema or vectran) from www.apsltd.com

  6. #6
    slowhike's Avatar
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    warbonnet's got you covered.
    there's been some talk (here & else where) about waterproofing fabric. i think the few that tried it wasn't as pleased as they would have liked w/ the results... uneven, heaver.
    but who knows, it may have been the method... or the mix.
    if you try it, let us know how it goes.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  7. #7
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    its ok, i will settle for 1.9 oz uncoated body and 1.1 oz waterproof tarp.

    has anyone used gortex for a hammock ot tarp?

  8. #8
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing & rings
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by skar578 View Post
    its ok, i will settle for 1.9 oz uncoated body and 1.1 oz waterproof tarp.

    has anyone used gortex for a hammock ot tarp?
    good choice. some people will simply spray a DWR treatment on the untreated hammock for better wind resistance in the cold weather months.
    i've not herd of anyone using gortex. good question. maybe some others will have an opinion on why that may or may not be a good idea.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  9. #9
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    gortex is waterproof and breathable, so it is the ultimate in hammocks and tarps, right? that would cut down the need for an underquilt or anything else.

  10. #10
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    What about Versatec as your all around material? it is light weight and breathable for the body, but specially designed to be water and wind resistant. but how does that work? a breathable wind resistant material?

    anyway a link:
    http://www.questoutfitters.com/uncoa....htm#VERSATECH

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