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  1. #1
    New Member Rider's Avatar
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    Hanging a Claytor Jungle

    I have previously converted to Hammocking - a Trek Light Double with a 9X9 "Neo Tarp". Since I wanted to have a no bug option I purchased a Claytor Jungle. (By the way if you can get the Jungle without a tarp and get the Sportsman's Guide Camo it is much better for not much weight).

    I talked the wife into trying hammock camping on a BSA family camp this weekend. We were in the Pike National Forest at 8500 feet with low temps in the upper 30's low 40's. The Jungle hammock worked great for warmth (JRB under quilt and a quilt over me). However, the Claytor was not anywhere as comfortable as the Trek Light Double. Need some help.

    I hang both the same way Spyderline to cinch buckle to strap wrapped around tree with a carabiner. (I ditched the nylon webbing that comes with the Claytor). The problem with comfort is that the Jungle hammock seems to be under more load in the center of the hammock than at the sides. This creates, almost, a ridge underneath you as I was in the hammock. I think this is a function of the design of the Claytor - which is basically a large rectangle with a 1 1/2 inch channel at the ends. I think this makes it shorter to the suspension line at the sides and longer (with greater load) towards the center. I think other designs avoid this in the whipping process (making the center longer than the sides pre-hanging. (Actually I am probably talking through my butt since I am a newbie - but that is what I have observed). Is this correct? If so what do I need to do differently to get rid of ridge in the bottom of the hammock? Don't say buy a Hennessy etc. I really like to the Claytor and it is already purchased.

    I tried double wrapping sypderline and cinching the channel very tight (sort of whipping) - this helped but did not eliminate my problem. Anyone can help? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    I tried double wrapping sypderline and cinching the channel very tight (sort of whipping) - this helped but did not eliminate my problem. Anyone can help? Thanks in advance.
    The Claytor is not made to "cinch" up. The channel needs room to allow the sides to come up the rope on each side. The higher the sides come up the rope the more it shapes the hammock. Try making a big loop for the channel with the line for the cinch buckle coming off the loop and then you can use the strap/buckles like normal.

  3. #3
    New Member Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HANGnOUT View Post
    The Claytor is not made to "cinch" up. The channel needs room to allow the sides to come up the rope on each side. The higher the sides come up the rope the more it shapes the hammock. Try making a big loop for the channel with the line for the cinch buckle coming off the loop and then you can use the strap/buckles like normal.
    Thanks, but, that was the first method I tried (using the Spyderline in a big loop with the Cinch Buckle on a double larkshead. That (under load) cinched the channel up and created the tight ridge down the center. I'll try again, but I don't understand how the load on the hammock wouldn't automatically cinch the webbing or the rope.

  4. #4
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    Yeah, the hammock will tighten up when you lay in it. I found that on that style hammock that you need to make sure the rope is sliding freely so that it can self adjust. Also pull the ends of the hammock up the rope loop a little bit before laying in it. The channel needs to move on the rope to center the hammock. If you tie a larkshead or tighten the loop too tight it can't do this on this style hammock. I had the same problem when I switched one of these to rope from the webbing.

  5. #5
    Senior Member schrochem's Avatar
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    Rider, I meant to reply earlier but forgot.
    It looks like the treklight also uses a channel, correct?
    IF so, I doubt the trek is any different shape (i.e. not rectangular).
    How bout the length and width, any different there?

    The first thing I thought of when I read your post was the amount of sag. Since you don't have a ridgeline, each hang can be different. I saw a picture of the claytor in another post and it might have been the angle but it looked a little off for some reason.
    Try attaching at different lengths and angles and see if improves. If you put a ridgeline in there you can find out how much sag you like. Then you'll know what to look for when hanging (or you could just leave the ridgeline on and feed it through the netting and have a nice hang every time).


    Quote Originally Posted by Rider View Post
    I have previously converted to Hammocking - a Trek Light Double with a 9X9 "Neo Tarp". Since I wanted to have a no bug option I purchased a Claytor Jungle. (By the way if you can get the Jungle without a tarp and get the Sportsman's Guide Camo it is much better for not much weight).

    I talked the wife into trying hammock camping on a BSA family camp this weekend. We were in the Pike National Forest at 8500 feet with low temps in the upper 30's low 40's. The Jungle hammock worked great for warmth (JRB under quilt and a quilt over me). However, the Claytor was not anywhere as comfortable as the Trek Light Double. Need some help.

    I hang both the same way Spyderline to cinch buckle to strap wrapped around tree with a carabiner. (I ditched the nylon webbing that comes with the Claytor). The problem with comfort is that the Jungle hammock seems to be under more load in the center of the hammock than at the sides. This creates, almost, a ridge underneath you as I was in the hammock. I think this is a function of the design of the Claytor - which is basically a large rectangle with a 1 1/2 inch channel at the ends. I think this makes it shorter to the suspension line at the sides and longer (with greater load) towards the center. I think other designs avoid this in the whipping process (making the center longer than the sides pre-hanging. (Actually I am probably talking through my butt since I am a newbie - but that is what I have observed). Is this correct? If so what do I need to do differently to get rid of ridge in the bottom of the hammock? Don't say buy a Hennessy etc. I really like to the Claytor and it is already purchased.

    I tried double wrapping sypderline and cinching the channel very tight (sort of whipping) - this helped but did not eliminate my problem. Anyone can help? Thanks in advance.
    Scott

    "Man is a stream whose source is hidden."
    RWE

  6. #6
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    My Treklight double uses a channel. I replaced the stock rope in it and now use Spyderline 5/32. I needed a little more length for tying to my cinch buckles. My channels are cinched as tight as they can go. I have noticed a bit of a ridge in my hammock center. I'm thinking of tying it looser and seeing if it feels different.


    Quote Originally Posted by schrochem View Post
    Rider, I meant to reply earlier but forgot.
    It looks like the treklight also uses a channel, correct?
    IF so, I doubt the trek is any different shape (i.e. not rectangular).
    How bout the length and width, any different there?

    The first thing I thought of when I read your post was the amount of sag. Since you don't have a ridgeline, each hang can be different. I saw a picture of the claytor in another post and it might have been the angle but it looked a little off for some reason.
    Try attaching at different lengths and angles and see if improves. If you put a ridgeline in there you can find out how much sag you like. Then you'll know what to look for when hanging (or you could just leave the ridgeline on and feed it through the netting and have a nice hang every time).
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  7. #7
    New Member Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schrochem View Post
    Rider, I meant to reply earlier but forgot.
    It looks like the treklight also uses a channel, correct?
    IF so, I doubt the trek is any different shape (i.e. not rectangular).
    How bout the length and width, any different there?

    The first thing I thought of when I read your post was the amount of sag. Since you don't have a ridgeline, each hang can be different. I saw a picture of the claytor in another post and it might have been the angle but it looked a little off for some reason.
    Try attaching at different lengths and angles and see if improves. If you put a ridgeline in there you can find out how much sag you like. Then you'll know what to look for when hanging (or you could just leave the ridgeline on and feed it through the netting and have a nice hang every time).
    I haven't undone the Trek Light Double end, but I have never had the ridge problem with it. I was thinking of making a DIY hammock with a channel ala a Claytor. I am wondering now if I should make the channel an arc to help the load be more uniform along the edge when it is under load. Anyone have any thoughts on this or have done this?

  8. #8
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    Channel

    What do you mean when you talk about "channel?"

  9. #9
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by triker View Post
    What do you mean when you talk about "channel?"
    pretty sure that means the way the end of the hammock is sewn to form a channel through which the suspension rope is passed. Means you have two separated segments of the same rope coming off the end of a hammock. I think the idea is to run the segments to opposing sides of a tree.

    Speer type and Hennessy types have one end of the rope tied to the the gathered fabric at the end, and one end of the rope leaving the hammock body.

    my guess.

    Grizz

  10. #10
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    pretty sure that means the way the end of the hammock is sewn to form a channel through which the suspension rope is passed. Means you have two separated segments of the same rope coming off the end of a hammock. I think the idea is to run the segments to opposing sides of a tree.

    Speer type and Hennessy types have one end of the rope tied to the the gathered fabric at the end, and one end of the rope leaving the hammock body.

    my guess.

    Grizz
    That pretty much describes my channel on my Treklight except I take the seperate segments of rope and wrap one end around my cinch buckle and then take that same end back thru the channel and tie it off. Works well.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

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