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Thread: Finding a spot?

  1. #11
    Senior Member MikeM's Avatar
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    I use ten foot long straps from Arrowhead Equipment. I could have gotten along with shorter ones, but for how light they are it gives me the ability to take my choice of hanging spots rather than be dissapointed when I find my home away from home.

    -Mike

  2. #12
    mbiraman's Avatar
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    I think you will find more spots to hang the more you get out there. Not that its always easy. Most peoples background is camping in tents at established campsites or clearings so not use to thinking of anything else. Now that we're hanging it opens up more possibilities but you just can't hang everywhere. Some areas are harder than others and bigger straps may be needed but i find the more i'm out there the more i see and the more creative i get. I have a slight advantage in that i spent many yrs camping in non established sites so had to learn to look harder for a place to pitch a tent and i think the same applies to hammocks but easier. In the PNW forest can really vary from nicely spaced Pondi pine forest that looks like it was made for hanging to sellal?sp thick underbrush that you can't walk in. The PNW is such an amazing place i think you'll soon find a bunch of favorite spots.
    " The mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

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  3. #13
    Doctari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbiraman View Post
    I think you will find more spots to hang the more you get out there. Not that its always easy. Most peoples background is camping in tents at established campsites or clearings so not use to thinking of anything else. Now that we're hanging it opens up more possibilities but you just can't hang everywhere. Some areas are harder than others and bigger straps may be needed but i find the more i'm out there the more i see and the more creative i get. I have a slight advantage in that i spent many yrs camping in non established sites so had to learn to look harder for a place to pitch a tent and i think the same applies to hammocks but easier. In the PNW forest can really vary from nicely spaced Pondi pine forest that looks like it was made for hanging to sellal?sp thick underbrush that you can't walk in. The PNW is such an amazing place i think you'll soon find a bunch of favorite spots.
    I agree. I have found that the longer I have been hanging, the better I get at finding hanging spots. Granted, I haven't been where you are hanging, but the first rule, & one that I am still trying to learn (50 years tent camping vs 5 years hanging): Let go of your tent camping way of thinking. Also: It's sometimes hard to see the hanging opportunities for the trees. So, look back the way you came, or go Left / Right of where you are, it may show some things from a few feet away that you can't see close up.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member hiker_DC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rict View Post
    Well, I can see that hammock camping in this area of the Northwest is going to be a problem;
    About where in the NW are you?

    Quote Originally Posted by rict View Post
    What do other hammockers in this area do?
    I carry 20' long straps. I find that the trees are quite large in the area that I like to hike. Long straps are not that much heavier and allow you to get around those big trees.
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  5. #15
    Yoda's Avatar
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    I think the bottom line here is, get your suspension set-up for the area you are going out in most! For some this mean's 3-4ft huggers and 4-5ft whoopies, or 6-8ft webbing straps, 10ft, 15ft, and so on! If you go with Paul's straps from AHE they are pretty much the lightest strap out there and you are supporting one of our Cottage industry HF members, both are great thing's! If you have to carry 20ft straps, then that's what you have to do, either way it still beat's sleeping on the ground!
    As far as the finding a good spot thing goes really you just have to keep looking. I have found that if I start looking as I am hiking along as I get closer to my pre-determined stopping point I have found a pretty decent spot or two! Depending on your area you might have a lot of underbrush do deal with, but keep looking and chances are you will find a good spot to hang!
    I know the last time I went out I did the looking as I am hiking thing and found what I thought was a great place only with rocks and deadfall under the hammock, I woke up the next morning walked about 10-15 yards and the perfect spot was right there, so they are there you just have to keep an eye out and sometimes a little searching does the trick!!
    Have fun and let us know what you decide!!!

  6. #16
    BLUEFIN 774's Avatar
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    I usually carry a GPS with me and if I come across a great hammock spot I will save that point in my GPS and if need be, I can backtrack to it. And I usually find a spot if I reallyl look hard. I'm in Newfoundland where our trees are not very large but they are plentiful. When on the trail just keep an eye out for good spots it does not take long to get used to doing this.

    Take care,
    Bluefin

  7. #17
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    I made my whoopies extra long. I can always put my strap on the load side of the tree and use the extra length from my whoopies to make up the difference. I carry 8' straps and I'm in the northern and western part of the PNW. My trees are big bu I can find hanging spots all over the place. Evne used a trunk and a huge limb once as my two achor points.
    Bat
    Beginning my NOBO trip on the AT on 2/28/12.

  8. #18
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLUEFIN 774 View Post
    I usually carry a GPS with me and if I come across a great hammock spot I will save that point in my GPS and if need be, I can backtrack to it. .........
    Yeah, I do that! Or come back to it sometime in the future.

    Rict, it helps if you can be flexible about when you stop. And if you start looking during the last couple of hours of your hike, maybe willing to stop when you see a prime spot. Or conversely, just keep walking until you find something, and surely you will, unless you are above timberline obviously.

    Where I most commonly hike, I bet I lose at least half of the trees to Poison Ivy vines or ground cover. Add in the widow makers, too big/too little/too far apart/too close/ and saplings/brush between the trees and oh boy! Still, in a land of a billion trees, I virtually always find something. Plus, most of these places I'm trying to hang would be even tougher for tent sites anyway. Except at developed camp grounds, where there might be plenty of tent sites but usable trees might be scarce.

    The more hangers you have (like at a group hang) the trickier it gets when you are all trying to stay close. Or, if you are with tenting buddies and trying to find good trees close to where the adequate tent sites are.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  9. #19
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    OK, let me see if I can reply to some of these replies:

    Thanks for the info on Arrowhead Equip's long straps; this will at least give me some options.

    I guess the area I went this weekend was a combo of these two:
    "Old Growth = Medium size trees+ densely packed + underbrush
    New Growth = 'Slender' trees + densely packed + LOTS of underbrush + hard to tell the separation between brush/shrubs and trees."
    There were some really large trees, many large trees, but LOTS of underbrush...

    Yup, I was looking along the way, that's why I said that I hiked for several miles without finding a spot; and yes, it would have been that way using a tent as well: no clear spots because of the DENSE underbrush.

    I live in Seattle, but I was hiking on the west side of Stevens Pass; my guess is that the east side of the mountains has better/more frequent sites.

    "thick underbrush that you can't walk in"...yup, that was where I was

    "I think you will find more spots to hang the more you get out there." I'm sure that's true, I found that to be the case when I was tent camping.

    "Most peoples background is camping in tents at established campsites or clearings so not use to thinking of anything else." Actually, I usually go out by myself in areas that are specifically NOT established campsites; the only reason I followed a "regulation" trail this time was that I wanted to find something without hiking for miles...big mistake.

    "you might need some shovels, hedge trimmers, or dynamite". I was actually fantasizing about this while I was trudging along...I have some experience with explosives, and I was calculating in my head how much of what kind I would need to blast out a nice clear 20 ft radius!

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