Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Posts
    4

    Pad or No Pad - Advise

    Cold is a relative thing and I understand that everyone has a different cold tolerance... And that a UQ is the best... However....

    I purchased a BB 1.7 DL and I am getting prepared to spend my first night hanging from a tree. I am planning on using this on a car camp so weight is not a issue. The temperature is going to be 90F during the day and 60F at night.

    My current plan is to lay on a standard square sleeping bag open with a sheet on top. If it gets cold, flap the part I am not sleeping on over. Has anyone done this and what is the lowest temp that you would do this?? Would this be enough insulation for the bottom??

    My thoughts are half of a sleeping bag would be more comfy than CCF but I could be off base. Thanks for the insight and help for successful first hang.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird/Ridgerunner
    Tarp
    OES 12x10
    Insulation
    WB Yeti/Lynx
    Posts
    2,302
    Images
    42
    At 60F, you will want insulation under you. Depending on your bag, it might be enough, or you might want a pad. The downside of the pad is that if you over-heat even a little, it will get clammy and nasty with sweat.

    Perhaps counter-intuitively, a lower quality bag will actually serve you better in this case, since the insulation will be less compressible and thus you'll lose less heat.


    Honestly, for car camping where weight isn't a concern and the low is 60, I'd go with a wool or fleece blanket underneath you. It's more comfortable, you don't have to worry about the insulation compressing, and it will breathe to keep you from getting funky if it's too warm. It's also easier to kick out of the way if you are hot. I've used a decent weight fleece blanket around those temperatures and it worked well.

  3. #3
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Hammock
    Varies
    Tarp
    GargoyleGear Ogee
    Insulation
    UQ-varies w/season
    Suspension
    onrope buckle
    Posts
    5,982
    I've done the cheap sleeping bag under me gig, and I liked it...works really well for Oklahoma summer nights (~70-75*). I wouldn't hesitate to try 60*.

    Mustardman's suggestion is a good one, too. A fleece sleeping bag used in conjunction with a pad of your choosing makes a pretty good system if you're not going the UQ route. Use the fleece alone on warmer nights, and put the pad in the fleece bag for cooler temps.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
    John Steinbeck

  4. #4
    gargoyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Middleville, Mi
    Hammock
    G-Bird II
    Tarp
    Ogee tarp
    Insulation
    AHE TQ DIY Down UQ
    Suspension
    whoop dutch!
    Posts
    6,091
    Images
    46
    Your car camping, bring the bag and the pad and the blanket. Play with your set up and see what works best for you. Nice to have the option of adding another layer, if the weather turns.
    Being a double layer hammock, you have lots of options, the blanket idea in the pocket is a great suggestion.
    Especially being your first time out, bring it all and try all the options.
    Welcome to the forum, enjoy.
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    At those temps I would say no problem staying warm laying on top of both layers of a sleeping bag. But, always plan for worse that you expect. Too much cooler and you may start getting uncomfortable. Nice to have a pad nearby if that happens. Plus, you can use it as a doormat to take your boots off prior to getting into the hammock and you don't have to step in dirt or on those sharp nasty twigs when you get out of the hammock. Win/win!
    Trust nobody!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •