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  1. #21
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nacra533 View Post
    The trick to using the NE Ropes method is to use a small piece of whipping twine to pull the line back though itself. It's a little finnicky, but nothing that can't be done.

    If you're making a sling with an eye on each end...
    Another method that works great in 7/64" and 1/8" amsteel as well as vectran lines is to push the eye on the other end of the line through just as you would the tail. It hurts nothing to enlarge the opening a little and when splicing larger line, drastically opening the line is required.

    but my question is WHY??

    Locked Brummels are not required. You can use a straight bury or a regular brummel, both of which are stronger. Locked Brummels are WEAKER than the other splicing methods. Some may disagree on how much weaker, but no one with any experience will say they are as strong or stronger.

    The reason for locking the brummel is to prevent the splice from working loose under low load conditions. The same thing can be done with a little whipping twine, sewing thread, or dental floss. Either stitch the bury for a couple passes or whip the beginning of the bury. Both methods keep the splice from working loose under low load.
    You are correct. Locked Brummels are, strictly speaking, not necessary, but having made quite a few stitched eye splices, the locked brummel is a heck of a lot easier for me than the stitching.

    As for the locked brummel vs the regular brummel or plain bury for strength - I'll take Brion Toss's word on that. He writes of Locked Brummel:

    Properly done, this splice will approach 100% efficiency in strength and security.
    I don't think the regular Brummel or plain bury is going to improve on that. Also, the regular Brummel is far from secure.

    Also, I have experienced times when stitching a splice is simply not feasible due to lack of needle and/or thread. But doing a locked Brummel was feasible since the splicing tool was readily at hand.

  2. #22
    Bubba's Avatar
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    Just tried this and it is very handy to redo the fixed eye on a whoopie sling without having to undo the adjustable bury. Thanks!
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  3. #23
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    I talked to Old Gringo about this method of Brummel splice this past weekend. I was not aware he was talking about the McDonald Method, I thought he was referring to the NER method. I have been using the NER method for some time and just tried the McDonald Method; pretty slick. Now that I look at it it seems like I have seen it tied before, but I just can't recall exactly where or why. Anyway, now I have two methods for splicing a Brummel locked eye splice!
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  4. #24
    Senior Member nacra533's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiredFeet View Post
    You are correct. Locked Brummels are, strictly speaking, not necessary, but having made quite a few stitched eye splices, the locked brummel is a heck of a lot easier for me than the stitching.

    As for the locked brummel vs the regular brummel or plain bury for strength - I'll take Brion Toss's word on that. He writes of Locked Brummel:



    I don't think the regular Brummel or plain bury is going to improve on that. Also, the regular Brummel is far from secure.

    Also, I have experienced times when stitching a splice is simply not feasible due to lack of needle and/or thread. But doing a locked Brummel was feasible since the splicing tool was readily at hand.

    I don't want to start an argument on the merits of each splice. I use locked brummels almost exclusively on my boats. Toss is a well respected rigger and he says "...it approaches 100%." I disagree with him on that point because of the shearing forces created in the locked brummel as opposed to gripping forces. I do agree that it's strong enough for anything we will use it for on a hammock. I also use an "aussie splice" (pictured) on the water. It is a locked brummell without the bury. I know it's not as strong becuase it's a "mechanical" splice. The tails must be equally loaded. By the way, the reason you bury on a locked brummell is to help ensure the tails are equally loaded.


    A properly done brummel or straight bury is stronger than 100%. When properly done, the point of failure is always on the line itself -outside of the splice. When improperly done (usually a bad taper), the point of failure is always at the base of the splice where the taper ends.

    I totally disagree about the others not being as secure, when properly done. Take a look at tug boat lines, synthetic lifting slings, and all sorts of lines used in industy. It will be very hard to find a locked brummell anywhere. You will find lots of stitched splices. I mention again for the less experienced that the stitching is for the low load condition, not for adding strength to the splice.
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  5. #25
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    Came upon this old thread researching something else. Just for reference then, here is a writeup on the McDonald Brummel along with pictures and text. There is a bit of "magic" coloring (Photoshop) that helps to keep clear what is going on. http://L-36.com/brummel2.php

    That said, I prefer lock stitching to the Brummel. My limited testing was a sample of line with one of each kind of splice and it broke in the middle away from either splice. However, the stitched eye splice survived the impact of the break where the Brummel was really taken out of shape by the recoil.

    Stitching should be a "S" stitch and not too tight. Don't use a speedy stitcher as the stitches need to stretch under load or they will snap.

    Allen

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