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  1. #21
    i don't know, could you thread 1/2" grossgrain through there?. even so, might have to redo the hem at the corners (not that big of a deal), so the hems were open at the corners and so there was an inch+/- or so between the two sides (see diagram on previous page). also, make sure to get the amount of gg that sticks out of the tarp just right. too much sticking out and the hem openings could get stressed, to little and the corners will be a little wrinkly. just keep the same angle the webbing has coming out of the hem. it's not too hard if you watch for it. use a pin or whatever to hold it where you want it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
    Brandon since I have already done my hems am I correct in thinking I am too late for your method?

  2. #22
    Dutch's Avatar
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    I'm done....almost

    All I have to do is seem seal. Man I am proud of how this turned out. Big thanks to BB and lvleph. I knew lvleph when all he could make is a stove or two, now look at him with his fancy speadsheet.
    Brandon there was just no way I could get grossgrain in that hem. It was way to tight. Next one I'm gonna have to try your idea. I like the idea of not putting all that webbing on plus it will make it pitch tighter. I will be bringing it to Maryland Hangout in two weeks to show it off.
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  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    no, if regular corner pull tabs are used, ALL force is distributed only to the stitches that connect the pull tab/pull tab patch to the sil. no actual force is distributed to the edge, trimmed or not.
    I've got a follow-up question on this topic--this is a mid-course correction.
    If I want to skip the traditional corner-sewn tie-outs and use a method to transfer the force to the entire hem, which approach would be a better solution:

    1. Sew 1" Grosgrain to hem both sides of the tarp in a continuous band, leaving a loop (or twist?) at the four outer corners where a D-ring is installed

    2. Sew 1 1/2" Grosgrain in sections to hem the tarp, leaving a channel in which a (for lack of a better term) flat drawstring is threaded. A D-ring would be placed in all four of the open corners for tieouts.

    I'm thinking #1 would be my best bet. I think I'll reinforce that webbing in the corner to minimize wear.

    Thanks for this discussion.

    TWS

  4. #24
    Senior Member stoikurt's Avatar
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    I would go with #1.
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  5. #25
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    I'm wondering about the best way to thread the grosgrain through the hem. Although the coat hanger and fiancée technique sounds like a, um, delightful bonding experience, I can't help but wonder if there's a more direct method.

    One thing that came to mind tonight was using bullet weights, found in the fishing section of Wal-Mart. They are heavy yet quite small--the 1/8 ounce ones are less than 1/4 inch wide, and the 1/2 ounce models are just under 1/3 inch wide. They have a hole running through them, and their narrow, pointed shape seems to be ideal for finding its way through a hem.

    Would it work tie a length thread through one of these, tie the other end of the thread to the grosgrain, and let gravity do the work of pulling the bullet weight--and with it, the grosgrain--through the hem?

    There may be something obviously wrong with this idea, but as I wait for my sewing machine to get back from the repair shop, I have nothing to do but fantasize and obsess during the day.

  6. #26
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    I think the weight idea might work... I'd pull a stronger line than thread though, (fishing line?)... And get it all the way through one side before using it to fish the grosgrain through.

  7. #27
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    Use a large safety pin. Old sewing trick. It's long enough and has enough stiffness to push through a channel.
    Bad spellers of the world Untie!

  8. #28
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    I'm not certain I understand how the large safety pin would be better than using a heavy weight. It makes sense that a safety pin would be easier to push and pull it through a channel than just the grosgrain alone, but letting a weight fall through the channel would seem to be so much easier than manipulating something through all those yards of hemming.

    Am I missing something here?

  9. #29
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    It actually works very quickly just use the pin to catch the end of the grosgrain ribbon, and then close it up.

    It just feeds through sort of caterpillar/accordion style. Push the pin down the tube (gather the fabric over the pin) then pull the gathers off the back, then repeat.

    A wire fish as used by electricians would be the fastest method, but its a pretty specialized piece of equipment. Literally it'd take longer to attach the grosgrain than to feed it down and pull it back....

  10. #30
    Senior Member Redtail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nartoff View Post
    I'm not certain I understand how the large safety pin would be better than using a heavy weight. It makes sense that a safety pin would be easier to push and pull it through a channel than just the grosgrain alone, but letting a weight fall through the channel would seem to be so much easier than manipulating something through all those yards of hemming.

    Am I missing something here?
    I think it's a clever idea. Nylon is plenty slippery, as long as the channel is wide enough should be fast and easy.

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