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  1. #11
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    I use 550 cord BECAUSE of the elasticity of it. I would rather have abuilt-in "fudge factor" than miss judge an application and end up going hungry. I have used 550 cord for snares successfully, I gut and use just the sleeve so the snare knot slips and grips easier. It works on rabbit sized game perfectly. I have used the inner cords for the smaller bird snares I set, but I have abandoned them because they rate of return is horrible. I did catch a woodpecker once but let him go unharmed (his heart rate may have been a little high ). I had built a natural fish trap that was starting to produce nicely so I was taking the bird snares down when I found him anyway.

    I don't know the specifics of Dyneema but I would think that the shock load is less for the higher tensil strength and less stretch. A snared animal can put quite a shock load on a snare.

    550 cord seems to work very well for my applications. If I need something stronger it is proly for a specialized application so I would bring the right rope/cord/cable/webbing anyway.
    "I aim to misbehave." - Capt. Mal Reynolds
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  2. #12
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    Actually with less stretch shock loads are higher...

    Thats why climbing rope is so stretchy, so it doesn't snap your neck/spine/leg/arm/etc when you fall.

    Right tool for the right job is always the best bet.

  3. #13
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hogn8r View Post
    I use 550 cord BECAUSE of the elasticity of it. I would rather have abuilt-in "fudge factor" than miss judge an application and end up going hungry. I have used 550 cord for snares successfully, I gut and use just the sleeve so the snare knot slips and grips easier. It works on rabbit sized game perfectly. I have used the inner cords for the smaller bird snares I set, but I have abandoned them because they rate of return is horrible. I did catch a woodpecker once but let him go unharmed (his heart rate may have been a little high ). I had built a natural fish trap that was starting to produce nicely so I was taking the bird snares down when I found him anyway.

    I don't know the specifics of Dyneema but I would think that the shock load is less for the higher tensil strength and less stretch. A snared animal can put quite a shock load on a snare.

    550 cord seems to work very well for my applications. If I need something stronger it is proly for a specialized application so I would bring the right rope/cord/cable/webbing anyway.
    interesting stuff w/ the snares. if we ever cross trails, maybe i could get you to show me a couple. ...tim
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  4. #14
    Senior Member pure_mahem's Avatar
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    I use floral wire for snares seems to work pretty good for anything up to a large rabbit. pretty cheap too. but I do carry 550 cord too, just in case. Lashings and such and any other emergency use. I suppose I could also use it for snares but the floral wire is a lot cheaper and in my opinion more suited puts more acute pressure were it is needed and with the right loop at the end binds down just fine. Floral wire comes in handy for many uses also besides.

  5. #15
    zdp, sounds like the 25# test spectra fishing line you have is probably your best bet, it has to weigh nothing even for 100'. most spectra or vectran covered and bare is a 12 strand braid. those 12 lines are just twisted fibers. might be hard taking apart the 12 strand braid part though, but maybe it's doable.

  6. #16
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    Be happy to show you some of 'em Slowhike, I'm full of useless survival info; of course, it's only useless until you need it !

    I have never carried floral wire but I do carry eight feet of small gauge stainless steel wire. Six feet in my pack and two feet in my PSK. It has gads of good uses, I have use it to fix a busted eyeglass hinge to a makeshift needle. It also makes a great snare for bigger than rabbit animals or animals that would chew thru a rope snare.
    "I aim to misbehave." - Capt. Mal Reynolds
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapt View Post
    Actually with less stretch shock loads are higher...

    Thats why climbing rope is so stretchy, so it doesn't snap your neck/spine/leg/arm/etc when you fall.

    Right tool for the right job is always the best bet.
    Perhaps I worded it wrong, but what I meant was that ropes with more stretch have a higher shock load rating. Not the shock to the load. Climbing ropes are engineered with stretch to combat rope breakage not cushion the person tethered to the end, although that is a benefit as well. All else being equal the rope with more stretch will have a higher shock load rating.

    I think you are talking about shock to the load and I am talking about the shock load rating of the rope.
    "I aim to misbehave." - Capt. Mal Reynolds
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  8. #18
    most climbing falls would not break a static rope of equal diameter, those things are rated to over 5000#, maybe more. any fall more than a couple feet on such non-stretch/static line would break your back. the main reason for the line being dynamic, is to cushion the fall as to keep the impact forces low enough so a human body can walk away. the rope is generally over engineered as far as tensile strength goes, although reduced impact forces of a dynamic rope do keep cams and other gear from pulling, as well as harnesses from breaking. harnesses have a much lower breaking strength than dynamic or static line, this is because the human body can only survive a fraction of the impact load the rope can. the amount of force required to break a 9mm rope, dynamic or static, would be many times higher than what it would take to kill a climber.





    Quote Originally Posted by Hogn8r View Post
    Perhaps I worded it wrong, but what I meant was that ropes with more stretch have a higher shock load rating. Not the shock to the load. Climbing ropes are engineered with stretch to combat rope breakage not cushion the person tethered to the end, although that is a benefit as well. All else being equal the rope with more stretch will have a higher shock load rating.

    I think you are talking about shock to the load and I am talking about the shock load rating of the rope.

  9. #19
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    okay, back to the topic, obviously I was wrong in using a climbing rope as an example of what I was trying to describe.

    There are two kinds of rope:
    1) Dynamic (stretchy)
    2) Static (not so stretchy)

    550 cord is more dynamic than Spectra. All else being egual I would rather use 550 cord because of the built in stretch. It is an automatic shock absorber (energy dissipator) of sorts. So my Sil-Nyl tarps, snares and other things that benefit from this characteristic would be used with dynamic cord (550 cord) not static cord (Spectra). That isn't to say static ropes do not have their place, like for suspension ropes and sail sheets.

    And, all else being equal, a dynamic rope can take more shock (impact, like a fall or a rabbit on the end of a snare) than a static one before it breaks. That was my point.
    "I aim to misbehave." - Capt. Mal Reynolds
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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Hogn8r View Post
    And, all else being equal, a dynamic rope can take more shock (impact, like a fall or a rabbit on the end of a snare) than a static one before it breaks. That was my point.
    the dynamic properties of nylon will lessen the impact load, but this is dependent on how much line you have in play. 50 feet of nylon will have alot more stretch/shock absorption than say 5 feet, which would have 1/10th the stretch/shock absorption.

    you aren't considering the large difference in breaking strength between nylon and spectra, and i don't know if the amount of stretch in 5-10 feet of nylon would offset the large increase in breaking strength gained by switching to a high tech fiber, even if it is static.

    i'm just assuming the line in a snare isn't any more than 10 feet long. i suppose if the line was long enough, enough stretch could be had to drastically reduce the impact force and offset the strength gained from switching to spectra, but having to carry extra long snares would defeat the purpose, you could switch to spectra, increase the breaking strength, and still have a smaller and lighter line than the nylon.

    i agree with you on using dynamic line for tarp guylines though. you hear everybody talking about getting no-stretch spectra guylines, and then adding giant rubberbands or surgical tubing so there is stretch to automatically tighten a sagging wet tarp. if dynamic line is used in the first place this is much less of a problem to begin with. just tighten the nylon so it stretches some. this also works better when the lines are a little longer and more stretch can be incorperated.
    Last edited by warbonnetguy; 10-07-2007 at 13:48.

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