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  1. #11
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekkingnut View Post
    No one watches my videos after all.....

    in my hh 101 (video section or YouTube) I attach a length of paracord between the two o rings on the tarp and use a prussik knot to make that length tight. That means you can hang it in the normal standard method but it gives the effect of hanging with two ridge lines. When I get in the hammock it obviously sinks a little but the tarp stays in place because it isn't resting on the hug net, it's usually about nine inches or so above the hammock itself.

    With the prussik knot on the paracord you have abit of freedom with it's height.

    During bad weather this helps as well because when you peg the tarp down at more of an angle, there is still a gap along the top for ventilation!

    I'll repost my video just in case:

    I watched your excellent videos, TH. But until I actually have time to try it for myself, I don't see how it will solve the problems so often discussed with the stock HH tarps. Though it may well. And I'm sure it will help with some of the things you mention, like keeping more ventilation by keeping the tarp well off the hammock.

    But, whenever I have used the HH stock set up, I am trying to avoid a good sized space between the hammock and tarp. I can get that space no problem when I tie to the trees. Then I have a nice tight tarp, and when I get in and it the hammock sags down, I have plenty of space above the hammock. And now I also feel quite exposed on the sides to wind blown rain. But, the tarp is about as tight and wind resistant as is possible with that tarp.

    But when used in normal stock fashion, the tarp stays CLOSE to the hammock providing quite good rain coverage. When used with the SS undercover, nearly bomb proof. But then, of course, the tarp is now loose after hammock sag. Because, just like the hammock, the tarp is now closer to the ground. And no matter how tight you staked it to start with, it is now loose. So I use various tricks to help with that. Like filling empty stuff sacks with weight and hanging on the tarp side hooks ( what HH originally put those hooks there for), tarp tensioners, attaching wide and high(er) to trekking poles or branches etc. Definitely helps, but does not cure. But I have not had time yet to try your extra prussick technique.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  2. #12
    Senior Member KP's Avatar
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    I use a separate line for the tarp. Rather than using two pieces (one on each end) I use one long line that goes through each ring on the ends of the tarp. Each ring is permanently attached to a prussic knot that is affixed to the line. I tie off each end to the trees. The first end is a simple slip knot with an extra slip knot for insurance and the other end is a truckers hitch so that I can get it as tight as possible. Then I center the tarp on the hammock and pull each end tight with the prussics. I jump around with my choice of having the line above or below the tarp. Much depends on the weather though it's usually below the tarp. Using the single line with the prussics create a sharp top line as long as I'm not using the line under the tarp as a clothes line. Which I admit that I do more often than I need to since I always carry extra rope and could easily hang a separate clothes line. Anyway, I also installed line tensioners to keep the sides nice and tight even in the rain.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_n View Post
    Except you can't buy it in the UK :-(
    If not available from a UK retailer, you should still be able to purchase one form the Hennessy web site.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekkingnut View Post
    confused....
    The hammock typically drops when you get in it and that causes a tarp attached to the hammock suspension to drop as well. That drop will cause the side tie outs for the tarp to loosen up unless you do something to compensate for that. Using the shock cord for the hammock side pullouts is one way to do that.
    Youngblood AT2000

  5. #15
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    As Youngblood says, trekkingnut's method will address one of the issues of HH's attachment method. It'll keep the tarp from sagging onto the hammock, but it still won't keep it tight. I've never seen any tarp attached to the supports that can pitch as tightly as a MacCat tied to the trees. And I don't think I will.

    Putting STLs at the ground level can help...but at some point you're just trying to fix a problem that you're purposely introducing yourself. Isn't it better to just not introduce that problem in the first place? Tie to the trees.

    Now that said, and since I like to tinker, I might have a way to keep the tarp from sagging when I get into the hammock. I don't think it'll be quite as tight as tying it to the trees, but it might be just enough to convince me to take it on summer trips. It'll take a lot of words to explain, so I'll just wait until I can post some pics.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  6. #16
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    As Youngblood says, trekkingnut's method will address one of the issues of HH's attachment method. It'll keep the tarp from sagging onto the hammock, but it still won't keep it tight. I've never seen any tarp attached to the supports that can pitch as tightly as a MacCat tied to the trees. And I don't think I will.

    Putting STLs at the ground level can help...but at some point you're just trying to fix a problem that you're purposely introducing yourself. Isn't it better to just not introduce that problem in the first place? Tie to the trees.

    Now that said, and since I like to tinker, I might have a way to keep the tarp from sagging when I get into the hammock. I don't think it'll be quite as tight as tying it to the trees, but it might be just enough to convince me to take it on summer trips. It'll take a lot of words to explain, so I'll just wait until I can post some pics.
    If you ever figure out a good method, it will be worth while even if not quite as tight as tied to the trees. Because in my experience so far, coverage with a minimal non-rectangular tarp is so much more effective when you don't sag far away from the tarp RL. Which is the one advantage ( other than some convenience) of a tarp attached to the hammock.

    Of course, with bigger and rectangular tarps, it's all moot anyway. Because you still have plenty of coverage when tied to the trees, even after normal hammock downward sag.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  7. #17
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    I thought about this a little more.

    Has any one replace the prussic on the line with some made from shock cord to keep the tarp tensioned?

  8. #18
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
    I thought about this a little more.

    Has any one replace the prussic on the line with some made from shock cord to keep the tarp tensioned?
    Sounds like a simple enough solution and easy to test without investing a lot of time or money.
    Knotty
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  9. #19
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
    I thought about this a little more.

    Has any one replace the prussic on the line with some made from shock cord to keep the tarp tensioned?
    Quote Originally Posted by Knotty View Post
    Sounds like a simple enough solution and easy to test without investing a lot of time or money.
    I have done this a time or two, and it can help. But the tension along the Prussic/ridge line is not the main problem. The main problem is the side tie outs, especially when they are staked to the ground, or tied to any thing else down low. Especially with a steep storm pitch.

    As the hammock gets lower, so does the tarp. If you end up 6" lower to the ground after getting in then your tarps RL is also 6" lower to the ground. Needless to say, any tightness/tension supplied by pulling the stakes tight will now be a lot less tight. This is where the lion's share of the loose, flapping tarp comes from, IMO.

    If the tarp is not pitched way steep, it is possible to hang some weight from the tarp. Then, as the tarp gets lower, the weight pulls down on it keeping at least some tension on it, unless the weight hits the ground. Bungees or self tensioning lines can also help. But this all requires you to pitch higher than you might otherwise, so that there will be enough room for the weights to stay off the ground, or for the bungees to still have some tension.

    A wider pitch, to hiking poles or branches, is easier to work with. For extreme example, if the tarp is guyed out high enough on the sides, when the hammock heads south the tarp might actually tighten up some! Some where in between makes it easy to hang weights or use bungees.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  10. #20
    New Member Hamper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    I have done this a time or two, and it can help. But the tension along the Prussic/ridge line is not the main problem. The main problem is the side tie outs, especially when they are staked to the ground, or tied to any thing else down low. Especially with a steep storm pitch.
    This makes sense to me. Would replacing guy lines with shock cord make a difference? Forgive my noobness...and the wine...

    Perhaps not strong enough for storm conditions...I'm not familiar with the tension from shock cord.

    Ethan

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