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  1. #1
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    Rain and cold testing

    Slept outside last night in order to test out an unmodified CCF pad in the 43 degree weather.

    All my clothes were cotton except wigwam socks and I wasn't very cold in my really thin zero degree bag. Probably not the most accurate cold test since I'm in my backyard and was nice and warm till I walked outside to sleep.

    My pad is 24in. wide and now I see why people say you need it at least that wide. I also hear you don't really need it long enough to your feet, but my hammock bottom gets pretty cold so maybe I just don't understand.

    I tested the stock tarp and it worked just fine for keeping the hammock and me dry. I haven't had my HH exped. that long so I'm still using the stock.


    Overall, I was warm with the pad and kept dry. I'm going to continue to test for cold climates though.

    A few questions though..
    -Can you sleep on your side in a HH? I can, but it just doesn't look so natural inside the HH.
    -People tell me to get sock liners for my wigwams, but don't wigwams already have liners build in?
    -Also, I need to know of a good knot to tie on an eye of a screw.
    http://www.sealtite.com/images/eye-screw.jpg
    I usually tie the figure 8 and half-hitch knots, but the eye of a screw is to small to do that for multiple knots.
    Last edited by aceatc; 10-07-2007 at 01:51.

  2. #2
    Senior Member GREEN THERAPY's Avatar
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    For tying to the eye you could get a weight rated biner and clip that to the eye then tie to the biner. There are a lot of threads in this forum on various methods of hammock fastening systems.
    What I lack in knowledge I MORE than make up for with opinions.
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  3. #3
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    Oh duh! Should of thought of that.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Senior Member GREEN THERAPY's Avatar
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    I see your in the Pacific north west area as well so we are trying to set up for the same type of weather. I am sleeping outside tonite in the wind and rain again and loving it. Thankfully there is silnylon.
    What I lack in knowledge I MORE than make up for with opinions.
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  5. #5
    slowhike's Avatar
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    as some of the others get back to their computers, they can probably answer some of your questions better but here are a couple thoughts...

    1st is a question... you have a really thin 0° bag?

    i would suggest testing in the same synthetic clothing you will be camping in, especially since you're using a pad.
    that type clothing will help disperse condensation between you & the pad rather than absorb & hold it.
    ...tim
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowhike View Post
    1st is a question... you have a really thin 0° bag?
    From what I've read, you usually want something around 5in. in thickness (loft?) for zero degree bags.

    My bag is barely an inch in a half. Just seems too thin to me. Maybe not? I don't really know...
    Last edited by aceatc; 10-09-2007 at 14:08.

  7. #7
    Senior Member gunn parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GREEN THERAPY View Post
    For tying to the eye you could get a weight rated biner and clip that to the eye then tie to the biner.
    It seems to me that if your going to tie to a binner then that would be the same as tying to an eye bolt.

    Try this one The Clove Hitch I like to tie this one with the loose or tag end back through the knot the way it came in to make it easier to undo it.
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  8. #8
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    Sock liners are for hiking - to prevent blisters and wick away moisture. They should be used the same as polypro underwear - tight against the skin to wick moisture, and covered by a blended (cotton/polyester or wool blend) fabric that will absorb and evaporate the moisture.

    If you have sweaty feet at night, then wearing them will have the same effect as wearing polypro underwear at night. (I use the term "polypro" generically - there are many variations of polypropylene - most of which now contain some type of "anti-bacterial" treatment because polypro tends to stink up from the bacteria that is in your sweat (although scientists don't all agree on the cause of the stink.)

    If your evaporation layer is covered by something that prevents evaporation (e.g. a non-breathable boot liner or non-breathable coat) then you have to replace the evaporation layer as it gets wet or the moisture will merely build up and defeat the purpose of the wicking.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    Sock liners are for hiking - to prevent blisters and wick away moisture. They should be used the same as polypro underwear - tight against the skin to wick moisture, and covered by a blended (cotton/polyester or wool blend) fabric that will absorb and evaporate the moisture.

    If you have sweaty feet at night, then wearing them will have the same effect as wearing polypro underwear at night. (I use the term "polypro" generically - there are many variations of polypropylene - most of which now contain some type of "anti-bacterial" treatment because polypro tends to stink up from the bacteria that is in your sweat (although scientists don't all agree on the cause of the stink.)

    If your evaporation layer is covered by something that prevents evaporation (e.g. a non-breathable boot liner or non-breathable coat) then you have to replace the evaporation layer as it gets wet or the moisture will merely build up and defeat the purpose of the wicking.
    I understand what liners are supposed to do. I'm just wondering if I "STILL" need to get sock liners with my wigwam socks. My wigwam socks say they already have a sock liner build in... thus there is no use for sock liners.

    Am I correct?

  10. #10
    Senior Member stoikurt's Avatar
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    What is being tied to the eyebolt? Is it the hammock? That could determine what is the best knot to use.
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