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  1. #21
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    I get a lot of mine here or the local fabric store. YMMV and probably does quite a bit up there.

    I order:

    1.9 Ripstop Nylon; 60"w, specify color: 1) chocolate brown, or 2) apple green
    I'm fairly sure it's DWR.


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  2. #22
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    Like I said, I never had any condensation problems whatsoever. I don't really think a breathing hole is necessary if you are using breathable fabric. The hammock sock or travel pods that I have seen don't have breathing holes.

    Jeff's site shows how he can use his travel pod in much the same way you are talking about: zipping it up around his body while leaving his head outside.

    With the design I use on HH will allow you to vent the hammock as needed. Once you are lying in the hammock the weight of your body will open vent slits at the head and the foot of the hammock. I later added cord lock at the point where the cover goes around the asym tie outs. The cord lock allow you to loosed or tighten the shock cord around the parimeter, thus creating smaller and larger vent slits at the head and foot as needed. I have even adjusted the cover so that there are no vents open, giving maximum warm inside the hammock.

    With my HH clone I can use the zippers for venting the top cover if needed.

    Grizz,

    A top cover is mainly there to help retain heat. It does help to block and wind, but if the wind is strong you can still feel it coming through the fabric a little. That's where setting up the tarp up to block the wind becomes important.
    Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



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  3. #23
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    blowing in the breeze

    Quote Originally Posted by headchange4u View Post
    Grizz,

    A top cover is mainly there to help retain heat. It does help to block and wind, but if the wind is strong you can still feel it coming through the fabric a little. That's where setting up the tarp up to block the wind becomes important.
    yeah, I was just responding to ZDP's statement
    the material that I plan to use is soft, breathable and very light - 30D polyester rip-stop. It will shed breezes and light spray.
    That and cheap too, I want some!

    The need for a tarp to cut wind was re-enforced for me last night. Inspired by a forecast for lows of 45 with no chance of rain, at 11 p.m. I was inspired to go hang. I set up completely in the dark, my headlamp was in the bedroom somewhere, occupied by my sleeping wife, who I did not wish to disturb. Anyway, I minimized the fuss involved by not hanging the tarp. It turned out to be windy, VERY windy, and I was just out in it hanging. Stayed warm with a Potomoc underquilt and a JRB Stealth quilt, until 5 a.m. Then I noticed that I hadn't snugged up the sides of the Potomoc using the shock cord provided for that purpose, so I was getting some moving air between the quilt and the hammock body.

    Next time I'll use a flashlight when setting up in the dark!

    Grizz

  4. #24
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    For those who are curious I found some data on breathability... That is Moisture Vapour Transmission Rates (MVTR) as tested using ASTM E96....

    EPDM Roofing membrane 1.8g/m^2/24hrs
    Tyvek House wrap 325-400 g/m^2/24hrs
    Soft Structure Tyvek 1,000-1,500 g/m^2/24hrs
    GoreTex Hip waders 900 g/m^2/24hrs
    GoreTex high breathable, less waterproof 5,000-9,000 g/m^2/24hrs
    Plain untreated synthetic fabrics upto 15,000 g/m^2/24hrs (or possibly higher)

  5. #25
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapt View Post
    EPDM Roofing membrane 1.8g/m^2/24hrs
    Tyvek House wrap 325-400 g/m^2/24hrs
    Soft Structure Tyvek 1,000-1,500 g/m^2/24hrs
    GoreTex Hip waders 900 g/m^2/24hrs
    GoreTex high breathable, less waterproof 5,000-9,000 g/m^2/24hrs
    Plain untreated synthetic fabrics upto 15,000 g/m^2/24hrs (or possibly higher)
    OK, I'll ask!

    What!?

  6. #26
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by headchange4u View Post
    Grizz,

    A top cover is mainly there to help retain heat. It does help to block and wind, but if the wind is strong you can still feel it coming through the fabric a little. That's where setting up the tarp up to block the wind becomes important.
    Walking outside to lunch today I was impressed again by the wind, and problems of heat retention. It then occurred to me that for keeping heat near me in the hammock, why not a bivy? I've got one from my ground-dwelling days. I'd think it would be lay just fine in a bridge hammock. I think I'll give that a try next time out. [will still need to have the sides of the quilt pulled up!]

    Grizz

  7. #27
    Senior Member sk8rs_dad's Avatar
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    Translation:

    EPDM Roofing membrane -- darned near impermiable
    Plain untreated synthetic fabrics -- leaks like a sieve

    Slightly more technical:

    The rate of water vapor transmission per unit area per unit of vapor pressure differential under test conditions measured in grains per square meter per 24 hours.

  8. #28
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    Walking outside to lunch today I was impressed again by the wind, and problems of heat retention. It then occurred to me that for keeping heat near me in the hammock, why not a bivy? I've got one from my ground-dwelling days. I'd think it would be lay just fine in a bridge hammock. I think I'll give that a try next time out. [will still need to have the sides of the quilt pulled up!]

    Grizz
    Or you could make a sock/pod type of thing for the bridge hammock. They work extremely well for blocking wind.


    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
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    I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    OK, I'll ask!

    What!?
    Sorry the units are "grams of water per square meter of fabric area in a 24 hour period"...

    One gram of water is 1ml, which is about .03 fl oz.... if that helps....

  10. #30
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Sorry to be the lowest common denominator. Thanks for the simplified version.

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