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  1. #41
    i don't think going with the smallest size pole really has much advantage here. you still aren't going to take it backpacking. it's strictly a car camping device. packability and being able to easily lift it by yourself are the main features. making it a pound lighter really that big of a deal.

    but, i would say that i probably gone with a smaller tube. i'll decide for sure once i've used it. i got it from texas towers (linked above) got the 2 1/8" with .058 wall diameter. it feels really stiff and solid. i think the finished poles themselves will be around 4# each or less, then those yard screws add a bit more weight, and i bought some cam buckles so the webbing will be adjustable. i bet it will be around 15# or less total weight.

    i did find the emery cloth today. right next to the sandpaper at hd.

  2. #42
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    Great!


  3. #43
    Senior Member kohburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapt View Post
    Neat pic...

    Things to note...

    Steel is 3 times as "stiff" as Aluminum.

    T bars are a fairly stiff shape.

    As long as the tie out and the hammock attach at the same point there is only compression on the pole no matter what angle its placed at, assuming the pole isn't anchored down or driven into the ground significantly. All the angle does is vary the level and direction of force on the stake by taking a differing portion of the hammock tension load.

    The conduit (electrical tubing) is thin walled. But MIGHT be stiff enough calculations are as above with the round columns under compression... Steel is stiffer than aluminum for the same dimensions and stronger, so its possible to use thinner walls. But thinner walls are more prone to denting when handling... Its also heavier for a given thickness...
    the "T" bar posts aren't actually an extruded T. they are called that because of the metal peice on the bottom that acts as a foot hold to push them into the ground. the profile shape of the garden post is actually a _/""\_

  4. #44
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    Hmmm..

    The T-bar fence posts I used to put in my fence were in fact "T" shaped in the extruded direction.

    Never seen the ones you describe. I have seen ones with a cross piece welded on though...

  5. #45
    Senior Member kohburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapt View Post
    Hmmm..

    The T-bar fence posts I used to put in my fence were in fact "T" shaped in the extruded direction.

    Never seen the ones you describe. I have seen ones with a cross piece welded on though...
    hmm interesting.. maybe its a regional difference, I've never seen one that was a T.

    either way, I ordered some metal to experiment with. should be here in a week. then the real fun begins

  6. #46
    i've made one half of the stand and it seems sturdy, now i'm sanding the insert pieces for the other half. i used epoxy to fix the inserts which seemed to work well. i made the inserts 12" long. 6 in 6 out. might order some strapworks 1" instead of the owf though. i got cam buckles from strapworks already for adjustability of the webbing.

    not sure about the finish, i might just paint it, or leave it as sanded alum, which kinda looks like stainless steel.

  7. #47
    finally set it up, sorry about all the sideways shots

    each pole breaks down into (2) 30" pieces and (1) 24" piece

    i coated the top piece with that plastic dip coating stuff, so the webbing will grab the pole.

    the ridge and all 4 guylines are adjustable with 1" cam buckles, i just set it up, and then go back around and tighten all guylines and/or ridge.

    forgot to weigh it, but i'm guessing 10-15#

    i also didn't have enough webbing, so i used vectran line for one set of guylines, and sewed 3 pieces of webbing together for the ridge, at least it's finally up
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #48
    slowhike's Avatar
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    what's that white stuff
    i think i remember seeing it some time back, but it's been a while<g>.

    is that camo webbing from OWF?
    those are nice looking bar tacks. did you do those?
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  9. #49
    yes, owf, yeah, it's 4 bar tacks, but i just turn 180* and go back the other direction, all done in one long stitch.

  10. #50
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    yes, owf, yeah, it's 4 bar tacks, but i just turn 180* and go back the other direction, all done in one long stitch.
    you don't use reverse to do the bar tacks? i guess you use a ziz zag stitch?
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

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