Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Senior Member cosmicmiami's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Hammock
    Hennessy Explorer UL
    Insulation
    HG 3/4 UQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    129
    Images
    4

    Need Clarification On Quilt Usage

    I need an explanation of quilt usage. I'm aware of the differences between sleeping on ground and hanging with regards to insulation and air flow, i.e. hammocks are cold without insulation.

    So how exactly are quilts used? If I'm expecting say 50 deg am I using a top quilt and just sleeping on an insulated pad underneath? As I understand, bottom quilts are used for colder temps say +40 and below.

    Thanks in advance.

    -Bill

  2. #2
    Mr. Arrowhead pgibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    SW Idaho
    Hammock
    Black Bird 1.1 Dbl
    Tarp
    AHE Shangi La
    Insulation
    KAQ Prototype
    Suspension
    AHE Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    4,537
    Many folks find that they use a quilt rather than a pad, at any temp were you would want insulation---below 70 for most folks. Not all but many of us find that using a pad decreases the comfort of the hammock so we avoid using a pad when possible. A pad will get the job done though and many have taken a pad to freezing and even below. More a personal preference/comfort thing.
    Arrowhead Equipment -- For all your hanging, backpacking and Ultralight Fishing gear needs.

    Free APEX Upgrade on Every Kick *** Quilt (KAQ)

    Now Offering FlameThower Down Gear And Tenkara Fishing gear
    Arrowhead-Equipment.com
    Tenkara-Fishing.com
    Visit AHE on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
    Sign Up for Arrowhead-Equipment Gear News: Click Here

  3. #3
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    near Memphis, TN
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    ZPacks CF
    Insulation
    Te-Wa / HG / WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie Hooks
    Posts
    9,686
    Images
    92
    Underquilts are used in all temps, up to say 70ºF. You're correct that convection of air cools the hammock from underneath, and that's why a hammock (when you're at rest) can feel cool below 65-70ºF.

    A person can use either a pad or an underquilt to insulate beneath. Underquilts are just the more convenient, since you don't have to 'try' to stay on top of them when you move around in the hammock.

    There are all sorts of underquilts, with different amounts and types of insulation, depending on the conditions.
    “I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt.” - Cormac McCarthy

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmicmiami View Post
    So how exactly are quilts used?
    In your location, just one word: rarely.

    I don't use pads at all, just quilts. I find them to be much more comfortable in mild weather and in cold weather, I dunno, it just feels like a richer warmth. An underquilt is one of the best investments a hanger can make IMO.
    Trust nobody!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    CA Central Valley
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BB!
    Tarp
    MacCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    JRB HR (2)
    Posts
    1,295
    I like quilts because they breathe. Pads don't - they don't move with you in the hammock, either. There's nothing like a soft cocoon of down while you sprawl and snooze...

  6. #6
    dakotaross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Chamblee, GA
    Hammock
    DL Streamliner
    Tarp
    Toxaway w/doors
    Insulation
    JRB and/or HG
    Suspension
    webbing/buckle
    Posts
    936
    Images
    8
    Think of the bottom quilt and top quilt in terms of a sleeping bag. You've got two halves of it while you're in your hammock. What it will go down to is similar to what you may have experienced already with sleeping bags. In a sleeping bag the ground is the actual insulation underneath you, but the UQ in a hammock is actually more efficient at keeping you warm, so I find that I don't need as much for top insulation

    For higher temps, depends on you, but UQ's can be used up to any temp depending on what you're using and your tolerance for getting warm. For me, when it dips below 50, I'll be using my 25 degree rated UQ. Otherwise I use a pad for bottom insulation since I don't have a summer UQ. Might depend on the actual temp when I go to sleep - if its in the 60s then I will not have the UQ on, but might have it ready to go in the middle of the night.

    Of course where you are, and where I am, too, don't need nuthin' right now!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    Pads or underquilts are not really related to temperatures. You can use a thin pad in the summer and a thick pad in the winter, or a thin UQ in the summer and a thick one in the winter. Just depends on what makes you comfortable and what your budget is.

    I've used a pad into the teens with no other insulation, and a pad at about 60F. I've use underquilts at 70F and below zero. I've use a pad/UQ combination with a wind chill of way below zero. Just depends on what system I chose to use at that time.

    I think UQs are much more comfortable than CCF pads, and usually a bit more comfortable than inflatable pads like the Exped Downmat 7.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  8. #8
    Senior Member Harpo63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lancaster County, PA
    Hammock
    WBBB DBL 1.7
    Tarp
    MacCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    KAQ,WB,Ham. Gear
    Suspension
    Dutch clips, strap
    Posts
    533
    Ok, tying in to what Jeff just said above... Im wondering if I misunderstood what UQ's do... Not trying to hijack the original thread, but this is related to the original post.

    Last night was my wife's first night hanging outside in the backyard with her new winter incubator. Shes a very cold sleeper. She used a 3 season black mamba TQ. I slept in with the Universal IX UQ (I figured I had it on backwards the night before, and switched it last night and it sealed up better) with a 3 season Burrow TQ. Ive also slept in my AHE New river UQ with a IX insert at another time with the 3 season mamba (all full length UQs). Im including all three for comparison.

    The low temps the last two nights got to 54 and 53 this am. Temps was probably in the low 60's when I slept in the AHE last time.

    Around 4am, my wife got up and said her back was chilled and she was shivering, she was going to bail back into the house. Said she was warm on top, felt the warmth from the TQ, but no heat from the Incubator under her. I was ok (Im a warm sleeper) with my IX UQ. TQ gave me plenty warmth, and in checking the underside, it was more temperature neutral, or at body temperature- was not giving me any additional warmth, but it was slightly cool to the touch. ummm... checked the gaps, seemed ok.

    She was wearing flannel long PJ bottoms and a cotton t-shirt. I was in a t-shirt and shorts.

    Decided to hop into my wifes vancated BB with the Incubator. Made sure the gaps were good and nestled in. TQ was toasty warm, but again, my backside felt temp neutral. I fully expected to feel more warmth radiate back there since it was a winter down quilt.

    My question is... are these UQs supposed to keep you at body temperature regardless of the temp outside (unless it goes over 70 degrees) and not "toasty warm" like I expected? I understand heat rises, so the TQ will make you feel warmer on top.

    My previous experience using the Lost River- it seemed to radiate a bit more heat back than the IX and Incubator did last night. None of this makes sense to me and Im dismayed that my wife isnt comfortable as I bought the winter incubator for her birthday. So Im wondering if I misunderstood UQs the whole time thinking they would capture and keep warmth under you like you can experience in a bed.

    Can anyone clarify?

  9. #9
    stormcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Lancaster, OH
    Hammock
    DIY gathered end
    Tarp
    Hammock Gear Cuben
    Insulation
    100% Hammock Gear
    Suspension
    Whoopie Sling
    Posts
    1,488
    Images
    25
    Interesting night you had Harpo. I know you checked for gaps and said all was well but if I were a betting man I would say that the under quilt was not snug up against the bottom of the hammock. The Winter Incubator is the heaviest quilt I make and with all of that insulation, the weight of itself can pull down enough to make a gap if things are not nice and tight.

    My suggestion is for you to try tightening the main suspension line by at least 6 inches (maybe more). Just add another knot below the one that is on there now. Don't be afraid to get it nice and snug. The next thing would be to possibly add another short piece of shock cord to the middle tie out on the end. Just hook it on there and either tie it off up where the S-biner is located or tie it to the gathered end knot. Sometimes that can help pull that middle/center section up just a bit more. The last option you might try, although I doubt you will need to, is to use the tie outs along the edge to attach some shock cord and throw it over the ridgeline to one of the other tie outs on the side. Effectively pulling it up that way. Like I said most people do not need them but they are there if you do.

    You should DEFINITELY feel heat radiating back up to you....Especially in those considerably warm temperatures.

    Let me know how your next test works out....

    ~Stormcrow

  10. #10
    Senior Member Harpo63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Lancaster County, PA
    Hammock
    WBBB DBL 1.7
    Tarp
    MacCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    KAQ,WB,Ham. Gear
    Suspension
    Dutch clips, strap
    Posts
    533
    Thanks Adam... will definitely tinker. I did tighten the shock cords, but maybe not enough? I see the loops at the ends. will try that. Thanks!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •