Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Minnesota
    Hammock
    DIY GreenBeanHammock
    Tarp
    DIY Tarps/HG Cuben
    Insulation
    Frankenquilt/Pod
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    14,490
    Images
    62
    Terrific .... I love a steep hang.
    Ultimate stealth.
    Shug
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



    Shug's YouTube Videos

    Hammock How-To Videos ..... Essentials For Noobs

    Shug and Friends Jammin'

  2. #12
    Poppabear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Lexington Park, MD
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird 1.7
    Tarp
    Zpacks Cuben Fiber
    Insulation
    Leigh's UQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies/Treestrap
    Posts
    2,642
    Excellent trip report! You made good choices, planned wisely and adapted as the situation dictated. I would say that was a very successful second hang. You can be justifiably proud of yourself. I would second the suggestion that has already been made. Get a pair of hiking poles they are great for maintaining balance in dicey situations. They also help easy the pressure exerted on your knees. Not to mention their usefulness for expanding the possibilities for pitching your tarp.
    Terry

  3. #13
    WV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    southeast WV
    Hammock
    DIY
    Posts
    3,690
    Images
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by Poppabear View Post
    Excellent trip report! You made good choices, planned wisely and adapted as the situation dictated. I would say that was a very successful second hang. You can be justifiably proud of yourself. I would second the suggestion that has already been made. Get a pair of hiking poles they are great for maintaining balance in dicey situations. They also help easy the pressure exerted on your knees. Not to mention their usefulness for expanding the possibilities for pitching your tarp.
    And you'll need all those advantages when you're 80, so develop your skills now. (That's my plan.)

  4. #14
    MAD777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Hammock
    DIY, WBBB & Switchback
    Tarp
    HG cuben,OES Spinn
    Insulation
    DIY down 3/4 UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Dynaglide & Dutch
    Posts
    8,571
    Images
    39
    Loved reading the report!

    One thing I have learned about hanging on a slope is to make my tie-outs on one side of my tarp twice as long as the other side. I use the long tie-outs on the downhill side. Of course, this requires marking the D-ring on the end of the ridgeline so that I know which side is which before I deploy the tarp!

  5. #15
    Senior Member E.A.Y.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rescue, CA
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BlackBird
    Tarp
    MacCat, JRB winter
    Insulation
    Crowsnest UQ 3/4
    Suspension
    Depends
    Posts
    897
    Images
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by coldsalmon View Post
    Do any of you have experience hanging on steep/slippery slopes like that?
    Quote Originally Posted by MAD777 View Post
    One thing I have learned about hanging on a slope is to make my tie-outs on one side of my tarp twice as long as the other side. I use the long tie-outs on the downhill side. Of course, this requires marking the D-ring on the end of the ridgeline so that I know which side is which before I deploy the tarp!
    I seem to almost always camp on a slope. Sometimes they are slippery and muddy as well. I use trekking poles, and one will be parked near the hammock so I can creak around the slippery slope like an arthritic 80 year old with out falling on my behind.

    I have accidentally set up my tarp the way Mad777 mentions. I have switched to an over-the-tarp ridgeline so I can just flip the tarp over so the short lines are uphill. I suppose I should fuss about the outside of the tarp being on the top but I'm just not that fussy.

    And congrats for handling your extra-exciting 2nd trip with such success!

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Mountainside, NJ
    Hammock
    depends on weather
    Tarp
    SWT
    Insulation
    various
    Suspension
    Straps, Dutch Clip
    Posts
    1,502
    Images
    11
    A great second trip! Thanks for posting.

    I often tie the tarp tie-outs to vegetation. Last month my kids and I were in a campground near Acadia National Park where there weren't three sets of optimal trees. We tied one of my son's tarp's tie-outs to a picnic table leg! It worked fine.

  7. #17
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Hammock
    ENO DoubleNest
    Tarp
    8x10 polyethelene
    Insulation
    REI long CCF pad
    Suspension
    Webbing, amsteel
    Posts
    10
    Wow, thanks for all the encouraging replies. The problem with the tarp wasn't so much that the downhill side was pitched too steeply -- it was that the uphill side was not pitched steeply enough. I made the guy-line on the uphill side about 1 inch long, so that corner was pretty much as close to the ground as it could get, and it was still almost flat and level. I was afraid that water would pool in the middle of the uphill side if it started to rain again. I guess I could have folded the corner over and used two grommets on the sides of that corner, but as I said, I only had two stakes. I didn't want to raise my hammock up too high either, as I was over a big rock.

  8. #18
    Senior Member E.A.Y.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rescue, CA
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BlackBird
    Tarp
    MacCat, JRB winter
    Insulation
    Crowsnest UQ 3/4
    Suspension
    Depends
    Posts
    897
    Images
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by coldsalmon View Post
    I made the guy-line on the uphill side about 1 inch long, so that corner was pretty much as close to the ground as it could get, and it was still almost flat and level. I was afraid that water would pool in the middle of the uphill side if it started to rain again. I guess I could have folded the corner over and used two grommets on the sides of that corner, but as I said, I only had two stakes.
    Disclaimer: I'm sitting here at my computer avoiding housework so I make no claims to the validity of the following!

    I would have tried this: found a stick just longer than the folded edge between the two grommets. Tied one end of a piece of line to one grommet, and the other end to the other grommet. Attached the stick to the line with clove hitches, so the stick is paralleling the folded edge of the tarp. Stuck a stake in the middle of the line.
    Gosh, we need a picture.
    Anyway - the stick keeps the grommets a fixed distance apart, the line goes from grommet #1 to stick end #1 to stake to stick end #2 and then grommet #2.

    Picture!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •