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  1. #21
    Senior Member Buffalo Skipper's Avatar
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    Another newbie question.

    I once saw a comic strip of a man in a lab coat (short sleeve) observing and taking notes. The object was a couple bundled in parkas--shivering in obvious discomfort. The caption read: "It is a scientifically proven fact that Floridians can freeze to death at room temperature." That is me. Below 60° I am at risk of frost bite.

    I regularly camp (backpack) 3-4 times a year intemps below 40° and once a year at or below 20°. I understand how compression reduces insulation value (been there, got the poster). I have a Kelty 20° down bag and an REI fleece liner. Keeps me warm most of the time with double layer of padding on the ground. How effectively would you think that a adding a (semi inflated) Big Anges Insulated Air Core Mummy Pad inside the bag while hanging with say a 3/4 Yeti? Again, I am trying to keep weight (and cost) to a minimum. I can take being cool, but not cold to the core.
    “Indian builds small fire and stays warm, white man builds big fire and stays warm collecting firewood”—unknown

    “The cure for anything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea”—Karen Blixen

  2. #22
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo Skipper View Post
    Another newbie question.

    I once saw a comic strip of a man in a lab coat (short sleeve) observing and taking notes. The object was a couple bundled in parkas--shivering in obvious discomfort. The caption read: "It is a scientifically proven fact that Floridians can freeze to death at room temperature." That is me. Below 60° I am at risk of frost bite.

    I regularly camp (backpack) 3-4 times a year intemps below 40° and once a year at or below 20°. I understand how compression reduces insulation value (been there, got the poster). I have a Kelty 20° down bag and an REI fleece liner. Keeps me warm most of the time with double layer of padding on the ground. How effectively would you think that a adding a (semi inflated) Big Anges Insulated Air Core Mummy Pad inside the bag while hanging with say a 3/4 Yeti? Again, I am trying to keep weight (and cost) to a minimum. I can take being cool, but not cold to the core.
    It will do fine ..... I have done it on winter trips in the past. Will get you down lower in conjunction with the Yeti.
    You more then likely won't need it in 40º ..... but you will know when you try.
    Shug
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
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  3. #23
    Senior Member Buffalo Skipper's Avatar
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    So to understand this correctly, do most here who use UQ and TQ just dressing warmly and not utilizing a sleeping bag?

    I know that temperature ratings are approximate, but it would help to understand what it typically does or does not include.

    Thanks.
    “Indian builds small fire and stays warm, white man builds big fire and stays warm collecting firewood”—unknown

    “The cure for anything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea”—Karen Blixen

  4. #24
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo Skipper View Post
    So to understand this correctly, do most here who use UQ and TQ just dressing warmly and not utilizing a sleeping bag? .
    That's what I do!! I was already using a down top quilt even before I switched to a hammock. Sleeping bags either didn't fit me right and I was cold. Or in the case of hammocking, I just don't like fighting with the thing all night long to keep it in the right position while in my hammock. The clothes I wear to sleep in will be determined by the temps. I've had one trip where I packed my summer UQ and the temps dropped that night further than expected. I ended up wearing all my clothes plus I'd put my extra military poncho liner on top of me. I was chilly all night. The next day I took the poncho liner and drapped it under my under quilt, under the hammock. That night, with less clothes on, I slept wonderfully warm and toasty.

    TinaLouise

  5. #25
    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
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    So to understand this correctly, do most here who use UQ and TQ just dressing warmly and not utilizing a sleeping bag?
    I think the best way to think about it is:

    Underquilt+top quilt(hammock)=sleeping bag+pad(ground)

    Now that can be mixed and matched depending on what you have and weather.

  6. #26
    Senior Member TinaLouise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goblin View Post
    Now my curiosity is getting to me. A 3-season will keep you warm in cooler temperatures, but what happens during the summer. Will that same UQ bake you when it is 70°? Can it work if you leave off the TQ? Thanks!
    I've got winter quilts and summer quilts, rather than trying to make one work for the ranges of temps I normally hang in. When I started looking at quilts, the first thing I noted was the temp ranges for any particular quilt. Then I noted the temps that I would normally be in. Plus then I had to add in that I'm a cold sleeper and would need the ratings to be about 15 degrees warmer (able to go at least 15 degrees colder than what I expected... I expect about 20 for the lowest so I needed a quilt to go to 5 degrees or thereabouts). This is my winter quilt and there is no way I can use that in the late spring or summer, I'd roast!! So I needed a summer quilt too. My summer quilt's rating is about 45 to 75 degrees. At 45 I'm adding more clothes to wear and at 75, I'm tieing it very loosely to the bottom of my hammock so I don't over heat. My top quilts will also vary by whatever the outside temps are. PLUS, I've found that I can use a lighter rated top quilt than what my bottom quilt is. I need more insulation on the bottom than I need on the top. There have been times, depends on the temps, where I'd pack my winter UQ and my summer TQ. Summer time, I always pack my summer UQ but sometimes I only carry a silk sheet for the top. I did a lot of testing in my backyard to figure out how to stay warm and I still will flub up sometimes. I've learned to make sure I carry enough bottom insulation, then the top isn't as critical.

    TinaLouise

  7. #27
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo Skipper View Post
    I once saw a comic strip of a man in a lab coat (short sleeve) observing and taking notes. The object was a couple bundled in parkas--shivering in obvious discomfort. The caption read: "It is a scientifically proven fact that Floridians can freeze to death at room temperature." That is me. Below 60° I am at risk of frost bite.
    Phooey!
    You're from the cold part of Florida. I took up the ways of the hammock while living in Vero Beach. We only had 3 days a year that it got below freezing.

    Agreed with Shug, you shouldn't have any problems with that set-up and staying warm. Even with that thin blood of yours.
    Trust nobody!

  8. #28
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo Skipper View Post
    Another newbie question.

    I once saw a comic strip of a man in a lab coat (short sleeve) observing and taking notes. The object was a couple bundled in parkas--shivering in obvious discomfort. The caption read: "It is a scientifically proven fact that Floridians can freeze to death at room temperature." That is me. Below 60° I am at risk of frost bite.

    I regularly camp (backpack) 3-4 times a year intemps below 40° and once a year at or below 20°. I understand how compression reduces insulation value (been there, got the poster). I have a Kelty 20° down bag and an REI fleece liner. Keeps me warm most of the time with double layer of padding on the ground. How effectively would you think that a adding a (semi inflated) Big Anges Insulated Air Core Mummy Pad inside the bag while hanging with say a 3/4 Yeti? Again, I am trying to keep weight (and cost) to a minimum. I can take being cool, but not cold to the core.

    I routinely sleep below freezing, all year, at high elevation. Here is what you do:

    Get to camp, change into base layer and warm sleeping socks.
    Eat and drink hot food and bevvies. Good complex carbs, sugar, comfort food.
    Before bed, if it's been more than a couple hours since dinner, eat some more and have another hot cocoa/tea. Walk around (no Sweatin' to the Oldies, just stroll) and get some blood going.
    Take that last pee break and climb in. Wear a warm hat.

    All of this makes a HUGE difference. The one time I was chilled to the bone above 40F, I was drinking a LOT. I can have a glass of wine, a beer, but three strong margaritas messed up my thermometer big time (not to mention my judgment) and I failed to put on the base layer or eat or drink hot stuff and got thoroughly cold. When I do the above, I can get into 3 season JRB quilts in the hammock and sleep through the night in November at 9,000 feet elevation while the lake freezes over.

    All your warmth comes from you... stoke it!

    I took my Winter Yeti (warbonnet!) out in above-freezing weather. I think I will rename it - the Sweaty!

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