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  1. #11
    Bubba's Avatar
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    Since you use a MSH it may not seem easier to you but some leave their entire suspension connected to their hammocks (like those that use the all in one system for example) and so being able to attach the webbing without having to feed it through a loop is necessary. Also if you have a lot of webbing (I use 15 feet per end) then it is a quicker and easier set up to simply put the end around the tree and hook it on with the Dutch clip vs feeding and unfeeding all 15 feet through the end loop.

  2. #12
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    When I use webbing, I just pull a short bight through the eye. Just enough to tie a Marlin Spike hitch and then hang the whoopie on the marlin spike hitch.

    For me the short bight is as convenient as a biner and less to lose and pack. The short bight is about as fast as a biner - a little longer to pull, but faster to undo.

  3. #13
    Dutch's Avatar
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    A long time ago (2009) before whoopie slings we only really had 2 choices. Either rope to huggers or all webbing suspensions. With the rope to hugger suspension it was a pain to adjust each side. I generally don't get it right on the first try and I would have to tie one side the see where the other side winds up and tie it, then untie and retie the first side. The second chioce was all webbing and generally used rings or buckles. Then you either had to take your webbing out of the device and refeed it or you used a carabiner. I liked the adjustable webbing but hated the big climbing rated carabiner on the end. I in comes the Dutch clip and 2Q saw it at an hang and insisted we make them for the members. The Dutch Clip work perfectly to replace the Carabiner and was about half the weight. This is still a great suspension with buckle, webbing, and Dutch clip. Then came the whoopie sling and there was an adjustable rope setup. It needed to be connected to the webbing by either Marlin spike hitch or the "all in one" suspensions. The MSH uses typically about 6' of webbing and that was almost what I was using with the buckles. The bulk and weight was negating the whoopie savings. The "all in one" is great but you still need to hook the webbing once you get around the tree. The Dutch clip works perfectly for this or you could employ the nacra-biner. I wanted to reduce the hugger length of the Marlin spike hitch also the hassle of it turning and falling off while adjusting. That limits your trees. I see you use dynaglide with 6' webbing. If you reduce it to 4' or 3' hugger and added a Dutch Biner or a nacra-biner you can reduce the weight while having the security and convenience of a biner. Here is how you can use the whoopie to make up the difference of a shorter hugger.
    In the end use what you like the best and it is great to have choices out there. So far the suspension methods have been evolving very quickly and I bet it will be different in the near future. I have several hammocks and it mostly the type of suspension depends what year I put it on. I'm still a big fan of webbing and buckles. It's a little heavier, but not that much. You probably like the dyna whoopies and that is a great suspension also. It's great to have a big menu to choose from.

    Edit; I should mention there are other suspension systems and I just hit on the most popular ones
    Last edited by Dutch; 09-08-2010 at 12:27.
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  4. #14
    Doctari's Avatar
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    For me, before I left my straps behind & then decided to permanently attach them to the whoopies, it was a speed thing. If I took my time it was about 2.5 seconds each strap to thread em through the eye. If I hurried: about 8 seconds each With the Dutch clips: it's about 1.2 seconds each no matter how much I hurry. Not much of a savings on a nice day, BUT, when tired & there is a T-storm on you, every second counts, at least mentally.

    Now that I have the straps sewn (in a loop) to the Whoopies, I can't thread the eye, so really don't have a choice. And still I think that for me at least it is mostly a speed / ease of set up choice. And as both Dutch clips weigh less than ONE of my Biners, I am saving weight, sort of.
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  5. #15
    pizza's Avatar
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    This weekend in the Black Hills I tried using my CampNano biners to attach my tree straps to the Whoopies. I like this better than toggles because when adjusting the whoopie you don't have to worry about the amsteel loop falling off the toggle/knot which I find extremely annoying. I think I'm going to have to order some Dutch Biners now to save some weight.
    I tried this biner/whoopie thing in two ways. One night I had trees that I was able to wrap my tree huggers around twice so I just ran one loop of the hugger through the other one and then attached the biner to the free end loop. This worked great and is a pretty typical way of doing it from what I've gathered. The only thing I always liked about using the toggles/marlin spike was the ability for extra adjustment in length on the tree straps by placing the knot/toggle wherever you want it. So... I tied a marlin spike in my tree straps but instead of the toggle inserted to hold the knot I used one end of my biner instead. This works great and holds just fine with no slippage whatsoever. I'm sure the marlin spike/biner method has been discussed before but I don't recall seeing it so thought I'd share.

  6. #16
    Senior Member KP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    The stitches in the loops are tensioned no matter what attachment you use. But a well stitched loop can withstand any forces you will put on it with a hammock. There are lots of threads bout the various ways to stitch a loop into webbing. But if you already have loops in them you don't need to reinvent the wjeel.
    Very good to know! Another way to save almost 2oz!

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