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  1. #1
    Senior Member MuseJr's Avatar
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    Bamboo batting question

    Does anyone have any experience with bamboo batting for insulation in top quilts? Or bottom quilts?
    The natural anti-bacterial properties have me intrigued. The 50 mile hikes with the venture scouts and long trips in the woods might be nicer with a top quilt that doesn't get ripe after a couple of nights.

  2. #2
    gargoyle's Avatar
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    No advise, but it is a cotton blend, and wouldnt provide much insul. from the looks of it.

    http://www.createforless.com/Fairfie...plid13949.aspx
    Ambulo tua ambulo.

  3. #3
    Senior Member MuseJr's Avatar
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    Thanks for the response...
    I was looking at the 100% bamboo not the cotton or wool blend. I guess I could have added that in to the original post. Sorry about that.

    http://winlinetextiles.danemcoweb.co...t-single-cuts/

  4. #4
    BrianWillan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuseJr View Post
    Thanks for the response...
    I was looking at the 100% bamboo not the cotton or wool blend. I guess I could have added that in to the original post. Sorry about that.

    http://winlinetextiles.danemcoweb.co...t-single-cuts/
    One thing that it also doesn't say, is how much it weighs for a given size or what it's insulating value is. Based on the product sizes, it seems it is meant for making comforters out for standard sized beds. So it probably won't be light or very compressible. 2 of the more important criteria for backpacking use.

    Cheers

    Brian

  5. #5
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    Nobody will really know anything about it's weight, breath-ability, insulatability (?), compression or other physical properties until someone with the actual material measures them. Until then it's all conjecture based on supposition and ignorance.

    What we need is someone with actual material to report or someone to buy a small sample and report.

  6. #6
    Senior Member MuseJr's Avatar
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    Brian, I have looked all over the net for any insulation data on this stuff but I can't find it. It must be used more like silk weight baselayers rather than down quilts.

    TF, Looks like I will have to try some out but fall is showing itself here and I don't expect any good info until next summer. Sleeping in the house just isn't good research.

  7. #7
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuseJr View Post
    Brian, I have looked all over the net for any insulation data on this stuff but I can't find it. It must be used more like silk weight baselayers rather than down quilts.

    TF, Looks like I will have to try some out but fall is showing itself here and I don't expect any good info until next summer. Sleeping in the house just isn't good research.
    Will be very interested in whatever you find out no matter when. New materials are always interesting and possible candidates for use. Bamboo also has that cool factor besides the fact that bamboo grows super fast.

  8. #8
    Knotty's Avatar
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    Running with TF's concept of supposition and ignorance, I'd speculate without much info that bamboo based insulation would be all the rage if it was a good choice. The outdoor crowd gravitates towards "green" products so one would expect bamboo batting to be showing up in sleeping bags if it did what was needed or came close.
    Knotty
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    WV's Avatar
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    A while back I was looking for the fabric used in backpacking towels, and eventually found the folks who make their own diapers, and who know all about ultra-absorbant fabrics. One of the materials they like is bamboo. I'm not sure something that absorbs a lot of water is a good choice for insulation. (My eventual fabric choice for a towel was Zorb.)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by WV View Post
    A while back I was looking for the fabric used in backpacking towels, and eventually found the folks who make their own diapers, and who know all about ultra-absorbant fabrics. One of the materials they like is bamboo. I'm not sure something that absorbs a lot of water is a good choice for insulation. (My eventual fabric choice for a towel was Zorb.)
    +1 to this.
    I have bamboo towels and sheets. I have no experience with the bamboo insulation, but I have related experience with the fiber type in a couple different applications.

    The towels are very soft, and dry me off very well. They do take a while to dry by air and in the dryer. They feel slightly different than cotton towels.

    The sheets feel slightly different than cotton as well. They feel smoother, like very high thread-count sheets. They feel warmer (insulate better) than typical cotton sheets, and also take a little longer to dry.

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