Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 75
  1. #11
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by Goblin View Post
    I can think of nothing better than to wake up in the morning within the confines of my gently swaying hammock to see the sun rise refract across the morning dew... Instead, I see the sagging dark green walls of my moderately sized tarp.
    Exactly! I've been going smaller and smaller in the tarps I select this summer and have regained an appreciation for the views that abound. I'll still take my winter tarps out when the wind is blowing snow and the temps are near zero, but I'm making a conscious decision to go with less this winter when I can.

    An 8x10 was one of the larger tarps 2 or 3 years ago. I would define it as moderate by today's standards. Ever try one of OES's Micros? Talk about a view!
    Trust nobody!

  2. #12
    Senior Member miisterwright's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Portland,OR
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    OES 12 x 10
    Insulation
    JRB Mt.Washington4
    Suspension
    Whoopie/UCR
    Posts
    384
    What you're saying is valid. The skills must be learned, and the big tarps might make it less crucial to be awesome at setting up. I totally agree with the idea of training hard so it's second nature when you need it, but I'm not sure I could ever bring myself to advocate for those napkins. My first tarp was the diamond that comes with the Claytor JH. I didn't feel I was lacking with that tarp. (except that my 12'x10' probably rivals it's weight and bulk). However that napkin that comes with the HH is barely adequate IMO. Yes, it works, but come on. Maybe we should train in the backyard with those napkins, and pull out the big ones for the field.

    We probably shouldn't be disparaging of stock tarps. But if some one is going to spend money on a tarp I think their money is better spent on a large tarp.
    ~Bryan

  3. #13
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    near Memphis, TN
    Hammock
    WB Traveler
    Tarp
    ZPacks CF
    Insulation
    Te-Wa / HG / WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie Hooks
    Posts
    9,686
    Images
    92
    Quote Originally Posted by HappyCamper View Post
    I just want to go and have confidence in my gear no matter what the weather.
    Would you not rather have confidence in your skills, more than the gear? Those skills are only learned and refined with use, instead of relying on 'more or bigger'.

    What if a limb fell on your large tarp, a day or two from the trailhead? Wouldn't it be better to take a knife and salvage a portion of the material, tie out the corners, and know you could use it safely and effectively to stay dry (and even comfortable)...

    I have nothing against large tarps! I have a couple. But sometimes they get in the way of learning good hammocking skills, and I think that's a shame.

    I think Cannibal just wanted this thread to be food for thought. That was the point of my post also. HYOT (Hang Your Own Tarp)
    “I think that when the lies are all told and forgot the truth will be there yet. It dont move about from place to place and it dont change from time to time. You cant corrupt it any more than you can salt salt.” - Cormac McCarthy

  4. #14
    Senior Member wirerat123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Guntersville, AL
    Hammock
    DIY DigiCamo Hennessy Clone
    Tarp
    DIY Hex tarp
    Insulation
    Modded CCF Pad
    Suspension
    Whoopies!
    Posts
    482
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by miisterwright View Post
    However that napkin that comes with the HH is barely adequate IMO. Yes, it works, but come on.
    I've been out in a severe afternoon Thunderstorm with heavy winds and rain that seemed as if it was coming up from the ground while using the stock Hennessy tarp.

    I stayed worried something might fall on me, but I stayed dry as well. The bottom of my hammock got damp from splash up. When the storm passed I flipped the hammock upside down and it was dry before nightfall.

    I prefer the smaller tarps, less enclosed, less blocked view, less wind caught, less tie outs to worry about and trip on. Still perfectly dry. I've been wet in many tents, but never in my Hennessy with the stock tarp.

    Barely adequate = perfectly adequate.
    Fulfillment is living a life that makes the lives of others worth living.
    DIY is addicting and fulfilling!
    "If guns kill people, then pencils mispell words, cars cause people to drink and drive, and spoons made Rosie O'donnell fat."

  5. #15
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by miisterwright View Post
    if some one is going to spend money on a tarp I think their money is better spent on a large tarp.
    Could just be where I live, but I'd rather put the difference in costs towards quilts.
    Trust nobody!

  6. #16
    richtorfla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Clearwater,Florida
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BB, HH Explorer deluxe
    Tarp
    AHE Toxaway:HH hex
    Insulation
    sleeping bag,KAQ
    Suspension
    strap/buckles
    Posts
    1,335
    Images
    1
    I also use the H hex. Came as an option when I bought the my explorer. Liked using the small fly and still use it sometimes but have gravitated to using the hex almost exclusively. I like the coverage and it works well enough to cover my BB too. With the rains here in Fl., it makes for a misreable time trying to stay somewhat dry with the "napkin". Have to say though ,I agree that you do develop a skill coping with weather with it.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    MI
    Hammock
    WBBB DL 1.1
    Tarp
    Ogee
    Insulation
    Jerry Chair
    Suspension
    whoopie
    Posts
    326
    Quote Originally Posted by miisterwright View Post
    Maybe we should train in the backyard with those napkins, and pull out the big ones for the field.
    Backyard training hangs are always a good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by miisterwright View Post
    But if some one is going to spend money on a tarp I think their money is better spent on a large tarp.
    I agree.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Ryvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Brantford Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    DIY Lazy Ryvr Bridge, Ridge Runner
    Tarp
    Hard Rock Shelter
    Insulation
    DIY Karo UQ
    Suspension
    Adjustable Webbing
    Posts
    164
    Images
    1
    As a new hanger I think Cannibals argument has both merit and flaw.

    The learning curve is very important for all tasks and certainly there is no substitute for first hand experience. Having gone through the process and trials is what makes him a valuable resource, and all the senior members of HF for that matter.

    But some of the greatest advancements we have seen as a species has been predicated on the work of countless others before us. Why not allow the new members to stand on the advice and judgements of those before so we can make further improvements. Why start at square one everytime?

    All that aside I recently had my first real hammock trip to Algonquin Park, and even after taking much of the advice and techniques of this forum to heart, I still left the trip with many more improvements I wish to make. Improvements I don't think I would have been able to do if it were not for the work of those before me.

    I'll be posting my designs for an intergration of bugnetting/ridge line and footbox mod for my ENO double nest soon
    When you discard arrogance, complexity, and a few other things that get in the way, sooner or later you will discover that simple, childlike, and mysterious secret known to those of the Uncarved Block: Life is Fun.

  9. #19
    New Member 2.ooohhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Ultralight
    Tarp
    Moss Parawing
    Insulation
    REI Sub-Kilo
    Suspension
    webbing 'n 'biners
    Posts
    39
    I guess I'm crazy but I remember 12'x12' tarps made from canvas that weighted 40 lbs when wet and took a small army to pitch in the rain. That's all I have to think about and I feel perfectly happy when I pack up my "large/heavy" naoh's 12. Could I get smaller/lighter lighter tarp? Yes. Do I NEED to? Not really, as the one I already had fit the budget, keeps me dry, and get's me into the outdoors now. Most new commers would likely do well to instead buy 5' of rope and practice their knots until they can tie them in the dark as that will go much further in keeping them dry/happy in the tarps they may already own.


    Erik
    “Rivets are the new duct tape.”

  10. #20
    Senior Member nacra533's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hartwell, GA
    Hammock
    DIY dbl 1.1
    Tarp
    DIY hex
    Insulation
    DIY 3 season tq+uq
    Suspension
    webbing, again
    Posts
    585
    Images
    26
    I have a 10x11 which I call "big blue". It was my first DIY tarp and buillt per Speer's instructions with the seam going cross ways instead of along the RL. I still consider it a big tarp. Yeah it doesn't pitch banjo tight, but I don't care. I like it and still carry it with me when car camping for "emergencies" or pitch it in addition to my hammock tarp to have a dry area to sit if it's raining.

    After that, I started making smaller tarps and evenutually ended up with one I like and I'm still tweaking it some. I would not call it a small tarp, but it's as small as I am comfortable with.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php?t=21172

    I have a small tarp but it's a fair weather tarp. It would do fine in a rain as long as it was coming straight down. I'm pretty sure if a storm came up with a blowing rain, I would either get wet under the tarp (if the wind was blowing the wrong direction) or I would get wet trying to relocate to better align the tarp with the wind direction.

    I kind of agree with whoever commented "if you've only got money for 1 tarp and it needs to do it all", I don't think anyone is doing a disservice by recommending a large tarp.

    I think we too often see the question "What is the best tarp/hammock/UQ/etc?" with no further comments on usage or budget.

    In reality, for function vs price, a blue tarp from wally world works fine.
    So does a sheet of plastic drop cloth.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •