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  1. #1
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    Cutting weight in the suspension system

    I am trying to figure out the lightest weight suspension system I can get by with for a 200# person.
    I assume the 1" webbing you get with cam buckle or ratchet straps is about the lightest option for the tree hugger part. I am debating on using that with two silver smc rings as a cinch type buckle, or using one ring with a larks head connected to the hammock with a woopie sling and a toggle on a marlin spike hitch.
    My trouble is I have none of this stuff laying around to weigh.
    Can someone give me an idea of which system I would be able to save the most weight with given the tree huggers are 8' in length when used with the 2smc rings and maybe 6' when used with whoopies, spike hitch and one ring?
    I guess if I knew the weight of the 1" webbing in 6' and 8' lengths that would make this a bit easier.

  2. #2
    Senior Member SmokeHouse's Avatar
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    I use 1" webbing, loops at both ends, 3" arrow shafts each end, 4' lenghts for tree huggers. made the Amsteel 7/64 whoopie sling 7'. saved me 6oz.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Absolute lightest would be a single strand of cord. Make sure you have a way to protect the trees - either a hugger or by putting vertical sticks between the tree and cord.

    Great combination of weight and convenience, IMO, is whoopies and huggers. Very simple and still light.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    The lightest webbing I'm aware of is from Harbor Freight's yellow polyester ratchet straps, at .179 ounces per foot. There are several alternatives (OWFINC's light polyester [same as ArrowHead's], Warbonnet's Polyester, JRB's Polypro which all weigh about .21oz per foot).

    The rest of the suspension will be as light as possible without any hardware. Cording only.

    The lightest setup that still has a hugger is probably either a Dynaglide whoopie sling or a Dynaglide UCR, with a short tree hugger onto which you tie a marlinspike hitch with a 'trail stick' that you pick up on site. Just hang the sling on the marlinspike hitch knot.
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  5. #5
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    It's all relative, how much are you willing to spend to shave a couple grams? Would you rather have a little more work to deploy or super simple to set up and adjust?

    I don't think you have to sacrifice adjustability for weight. Whoopie slings is the way to go. Dynaglide whoopie slings are your lightest option. Either make your own or buy them from http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/a...ategory/270327 or http://shop.whoopieslings.com They even have the weights listed.

    Don't use ratchet strap, most are relatively heavy. Go with 6ft tree straps and a soft shackle made of dynaglide. Both places above also sell the tree straps.

    Don't use any hardware. Even the lightest toggle, clip or biner is heavier than a soft shackle.

    Personally I use whoopies made of amsteel and 23 g carabiners. With arrowhead tree straps. Super easy to deploy, adjust, and stow. I'm happy with it. I've been thinking of getting some dynaglide to play with and some dutch clips to lighten up the biners. Soft shackles work but are hard to deploy or disconnect with one hand or with gloves on. They take a few seconds more to fiddle with.

  6. #6
    Senior Member SGT Rock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lando View Post
    I am trying to figure out the lightest weight suspension system I can get by with for a 200# person.
    I assume the 1" webbing you get with cam buckle or ratchet straps is about the lightest option for the tree hugger part. I am debating on using that with two silver smc rings as a cinch type buckle, or using one ring with a larks head connected to the hammock with a woopie sling and a toggle on a marlin spike hitch.
    My trouble is I have none of this stuff laying around to weigh.
    Can someone give me an idea of which system I would be able to save the most weight with given the tree huggers are 8' in length when used with the 2smc rings and maybe 6' when used with whoopies, spike hitch and one ring?
    I guess if I knew the weight of the 1" webbing in 6' and 8' lengths that would make this a bit easier.
    My stuff:

    1" straps with loops on both ends 54" long each weigh 19.5 grams each - made from a ratchet strap

    Toggles made from an aluminum Easton scout arrow 1.75" long each weigh 1 gram each.

    UCRs made from Dynaglide and are 57" long weigh 7 grams each.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SGT Rock View Post
    My stuff:

    1" straps with loops on both ends 54" long each weigh 19.5 grams each - made from a ratchet strap

    Toggles made from an aluminum Easton scout arrow 1.75" long each weigh 1 gram each.

    UCRs made from Dynaglide and are 57" long weigh 7 grams each.
    How are the UCR's connected to the hammock? Through the channel, whipped...?

  8. #8
    Senior Member miisterwright's Avatar
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    +1 for whoopies/UCR's and a stick you find in camp for a Marlin Spike hitch.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeepcachr View Post
    Soft shackles work but are hard to deploy or disconnect with one hand or with gloves on. They take a few seconds more to fiddle with.
    Have you tried the ones with a soloman bar instead of a bury. The are way easier to use. I can do them one handed. It's still not as easy as a carabiner or anything, but it's doable. I'm not sure if they are as solid as the ones that use a bury, but I've used them to hang. I make mine with a diamond knot and a soloman bar that begins with a constrictor hitch.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by miisterwright View Post
    +1 for whoopies/UCR's and a stick you find in camp for a Marlin Spike hitch.

    Have you tried the ones with a soloman bar instead of a bury. The are way easier to use. I can do them one handed. It's still not as easy as a carabiner or anything, but it's doable. I'm not sure if they are as solid as the ones that use a bury, but I've used them to hang. I make mine with a diamond knot and a soloman bar that begins with a constrictor hitch.
    Why do a marlin spike hitch at all? If your tree strap is to long wrap it around the tree. I don't like searching for a stick that will work. In Michigan if it's on the ground it will probably crumble when you try to use it. Sometimes I have a hard time finding a stick to hang my food with.

    I have not seen the soloman bar style, I like it. I'll have to try that. the only thing I see is there is nothing holding the soloman bar in place. I'd still trust it more than a marlin spike though.

    I prefer biners or clips because I can leave everything attached when I take it down and not leave anything behind or lose anything. It makes for super fast deployment and take down. There's nothing better I like to do than be swinging in my hammock before my buddy gets his tent footprint laid out.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeepcachr View Post
    Why do a marlin spike hitch at all? If your tree strap is to long wrap it around the tree. I don't like searching for a stick that will work. In Michigan if it's on the ground it will probably crumble when you try to use it. Sometimes I have a hard time finding a stick to hang my food with.

    I have not seen the soloman bar style, I like it. I'll have to try that. the only thing I see is there is nothing holding the soloman bar in place. I'd still trust it more than a marlin spike though.

    I prefer biners or clips because I can leave everything attached when I take it down and not leave anything behind or lose anything. It makes for super fast deployment and take down. There's nothing better I like to do than be swinging in my hammock before my buddy gets his tent footprint laid out.
    ???

    The soft shackle shown (and by the way, I too am a fan of using a sliding knot to close the loop rather than a bury loop) replaces a carabiner. I don't see that it has any relationship to a Marlin spike hitch, per se. You could use the soft shackle shown at the end of a webbed based suspension system rather than a biner (i.e., wrap the end with the soft shackle around the tree and connect to the webbing on the far side), and have the "single connection set up and take down" that appeals to you.
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