Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    New Member vtxdpm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Southeast
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Ridgerunner
    Tarp
    HH silnylon hex
    Insulation
    Burrow & Incubator
    Suspension
    DIY whoopies
    Posts
    10

    Ridge Pressing Outside of Left Leg

    I have a new Explorer Deluxe A-Sym and used it for the first time this weekend. I made sure to set it up properly (and I had practiced last week prior to my trip). I found that the entryway (velcro area) was prominent enough as a raised 'ridge' that it bothered my left leg as I lay in the a-symmetrical position it was designed for. I tried different angles and positions but still had pressure from that ridge.

    If you have a 'bottom entrance' Hennessey, do you know what I am talking about?
    Any suggestions on how to correct it?

    I may have to go with one of the new side-zip models, but really like all the other benefits of the bottom entry, if only I can get rid of (or lessen) that ridge.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Silverlion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hillsboro, Oregon
    Hammock
    HH Explorer Deluxe
    Tarp
    HH Hex Fly
    Insulation
    HH Supershelter
    Suspension
    Whoopies-n-Huggers
    Posts
    648
    I had the same issue when I moved into mine. After scouring threads and YT videos, I found I needed to raise the foot end up a bit and make sure you're not trying to scoot too far up on the head end of the hammock. Once I made these adjustments and the hammock did it's stretching out, I am much more comfortable. For the first few nights, try stuffing a little of your bag/ UQ between your leg and the closure for some added comfort. I know some suggest putting something under your knees and the sort, but I roll a lot in my sleep and I just didn't want all the extra crap in my bed. Hope this helps. Happy hanging!



    Oh, and if you want the zip option, check out 2QZQ. I'm getting the #2 mod this winter and opting to keep the bottom entry so as to have the best of both worlds. There are advantages to the bottom entry. Believe it or not.
    We must all learn to live together as brothers--or we will all perish together as fools. MLK

  3. #3
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,466
    Images
    353
    Ah yes, the infamous left calf pressure! Going to a side zip or even another hammock will not get rid of the problem with 100% certainty, if at all. Though I have an UL version of the Explorer ( bottom entry) I actually find it to be one of the "better" gathered end style hammocks in this regard. Especially if I get positioned a little more towards the foot end side rather than centered or towards the shoulder side. But this is - for me anyway- an inherent problem, to a lessor or greater degree- with all non-bridge hammocks. Something under your knees is usually the easiest way to solve the problem.

    My no net HH Safari is probably the closest to being totally free of this problem, at least if I get positioned correctly. Followed closely by my No Net Claytor and strangely ( as it is only 8.5 feet long) my Speer. This always surprises me, because the Speer is not even close to the flattest, but calf pressure is not usually a problem. Go figure. (it stretches a lot, and I hear that single layer 1.1 Black Birds/Travelers are free of the problem, so maybe a hammock that stretches a lot is the answer? )
    My other hammocks are slightly worse than the above in this area. The problem also seems to vary with each hammock depending on what day it is. IOW, I probably get positioned in the hammock a little different each time I get in. Or, even with a structural ridge line, maybe I hang them slightly different each time? All are dealt with with something soft and cushy under my knees. That is easier than trying to figure out exact positioning or tensioning of the hammock to make the problem tolerable.

    I have 1 hammock that never ever has this problem at all, no matter how I tension the hammock or position myself: the JRB bridge hammock. But, the gathered end hammocks have some other advantages over the bridge. So I guess choose your pros and cons. But if you find this problem to be intolerable and too much hassle, then you need to try a bridge.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 09-26-2010 at 16:37.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #4
    Senior Member jloden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Whitehouse Station, NJ
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.0 DL
    Tarp
    WB Edge (Spinn UL)
    Insulation
    JRB TQ, Multimat
    Suspension
    WB cinch buckles
    Posts
    402
    I've only slept in an Expedition once, so I'm not an expert but here's what I've noticed:

    1) The "ridge" is much less prominent if you have more sag in the hammock, so adjusting the amount of sag can make a big difference. I had some problems with this because I was using a short stand, and I had limited ability to adjust the suspension without touching the ground.

    2) In my GT Nano 7 and the Blackbird I tried, I was able to make a huge difference by smoothing out the fabric with my hands, sweeping the fabric to both sides to stretch it and get rid of wrinkles/folds under my legs. On the nano with enough sag put in it, I got rid of the ridge pretty much completely this way.

    3) The Hennesey bottom entrance velcro seems to make this worse, and I suspect that it's because it impedes the ability of the fabric to stretch, so you can't really adjust it very well. The Expedition in particular has stiffer fabric too, which probably also plays a factor. By comparison the Nano is particularly stretchy thin material so was much easier to play with until I found a comfortable spot.

    As other folks mentioned, putting something under your knees will help, and I suspect you can probably improve it a little by adjusting the amount of sag too. I doubt you'll get it to go completely away, but hopefully you can find a good comfortable lay with some tweaking. Good luck!

  5. #5
    New Member vtxdpm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Southeast
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Ridgerunner
    Tarp
    HH silnylon hex
    Insulation
    Burrow & Incubator
    Suspension
    DIY whoopies
    Posts
    10
    A big Thank You for your replies. It is good to hear this is somewhat a 'known issue' for some and I appreciate your suggestions.

    I'm new to hammock camping, and aside from this one hassle, had a great time 'hanging' this weekend with my son's scout troop.

    Be well,
    V
    Last edited by vtxdpm; 09-26-2010 at 18:23.

  6. #6
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, CA
    Posts
    9
    Have you tried changing the height of the head end in relation to the foot end?

    Depending on the height of each end where it gets tied to the tree you might settle more towards the foot end or the head end. Especially as a guy who's center of gravity us up around your shoulders it can be easy to end up with you legs too far towards the foot end and have a lot of unused room above your head.

    Hanging the foot end a little higher than the head end might reposition you a little farther back in the hammock and get your calf away from that ridge of tension. How much lower you hang the head end will depend on where your center of gravity is and how tall you are.

  7. #7
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Milton, PA
    Hammock
    Hennessey Explorer Ultralight
    Tarp
    Hennessey Hex
    Insulation
    HH Super Shelter
    Suspension
    ring buckle
    Posts
    7,298
    Images
    101
    I have an explorer and have found that the overwhelming cause of that pressure ridge (to extremes) is hanging the hammock to tightly. The ridgeline in the hammock should be barely taut. not tight. Some folks try to crank that beasty banjo string tight thinking it will give them a flatter lie. I have not seen the HH Instructions recently (I understand they've changed) but when I got mine it said to tighten up on the suspension. IMO that is exactly wrong. I have much better results with a 30* below horizontal slant to the suspension straps. The ridgeline remians taut and the ridge is no longer a bother for me.

    That ridge is a normal characteristic of the gathered end hammock of any make or style. Some better some worse but there to a degree in all especially if the hang is too tight.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  8. #8
    MacEntyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Jamestown, NC
    Hammock
    Molly Mac Gear
    Posts
    7,559
    Images
    6
    The Cure for the Cut-Across-the-Leg-Syndrome is to shorten the ridgeline.
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
    www.MollyMacGear.com

  9. #9
    Senior Member Silverlion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hillsboro, Oregon
    Hammock
    HH Explorer Deluxe
    Tarp
    HH Hex Fly
    Insulation
    HH Supershelter
    Suspension
    Whoopies-n-Huggers
    Posts
    648
    Great post, MacEntyre. I never thought about it(and I don't mean to jack), but I swapped out my RL when I changed over to whoopies. I may have inadvertently shortened it ever so slightly. OK, I'll get out of the way of the OP.
    We must all learn to live together as brothers--or we will all perish together as fools. MLK

  10. #10
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,466
    Images
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by MacEntyre View Post
    The Cure for the Cut-Across-the-Leg-Syndrome is to shorten the ridgeline.
    So, I re-read that old thread and I'm curious. How did your RL length vs cut across the leg syndrome work out? I know you had a Speer by the time we hiked the Sipsey, do you still have that HH? If so, did you solve the cut leg syndrome?
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •