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  1. #31
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmicmiami View Post
    What dynamic comes into play inside the quilt that would promote fraying? Just curious. All the fluffing around from the fill would do it?
    Warbonnet is referring, I believe, to the folly of relying on the seam allowance when the seam is inside the quilt. I had not thought about that but I suspect the constant movement of the quilt would create an environment more prone to fraying. In any event for whatever reason... I amend my statement to follow the quiltmeisters. A folded seam would probably be the best around the outside.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

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  2. #32
    Member nailer's Avatar
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    Hello,

    I recently got me a new (unused, that is) M 1966 nylon jungle hammock, and after cutting some loose threads it had on the corners, I discovered a tiny little fraying on a very critical spot, just at the corner of the tunnel where the rope runs, and like 1 or 2 mm. close to a stitch line.

    I am not afraid that the fabric may rip, as the tunnel is reinforced with webbing at the edges, wich are the ones holding my weight, but just freaks me out to know it is there, and with the movement of the rope it could fray up to the stitch line.

    So I was pondering my options:

    -Find some fray block plastic, or nail polish , and aply a little to the fraying. I wonder if it would stand the fequent movement of the rope, or machine washing.
    - Fusing the fraying spot using a soldering iron or hot nail, with the inherent risk it carries.
    - Patching the spot using a tiny piece of polyester and cement that came with a self-inflating mattress, and happens to be quite the same color. By the way, would the cement alone be sufficient to seal the fraying? It should be like the one used on tent repair kits.

    I feel like in the bomb squad, the littlest of errors could ruin the rest of the hammock or make it need more repairs and not look original.

    Attached is a detail of the fraying. The rope is about 3/8 inch .
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by nailer; 11-15-2010 at 08:37.

  3. #33
    Member nailer's Avatar
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    Hey, and how about a plastic glue like UHU? Or Krazy?
    Last edited by nailer; 11-15-2010 at 08:37. Reason: Crazy!

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