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  1. #21
    OutandBack's Avatar
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    HI BillyBob,
    I see a slight scuffing on the bark however, IMO I don't think this will harm this type of tree in anyway.

  2. #22
    Doctari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutandBack View Post
    On the Mtn Bike forum I frequent they swear Mtn Bikes don't damage the trails.
    Now here on the hammock forum I read straps and ropes don't damage live skin trees...
    I agree. And, tho I said "No damage" I did mostly mean for one night then move on. Long term or repeated use causes obvious damage, even on fairly hard trees like Oak. In fact I've decided to not hang from my trees at home anymore because even though I have about 8 different configurations using about 7 trees, I am starting to see smooth & even what looks like compressed areas, especially on the one tree that makes 3 of the others into hanging configurations. I use straps & never rope, but after two hangs from my Ginkgo tree, (VERY soft bark) there is noticeable damage, damage that may well have occurred the first use. I haven't hung from that tree in over 3 years, but you can still see the marks I made.

    As to anything not damaging a trail, well that is just stupid. A trail is damage, some do more than others, but any trail is maintained by doing damage. The AT is mostly foot travel only, yet look at how well it is preserved mostly by just walking on it. Yea, there are times when trees falling on it are cleared, & things like that, but just "gentle feet" walking on it & doing damage is what keep it visible.

    I honestly don't know the answer to this puzzle, but I do try to pick sturdy trees, with a minimum diameter of 8" or more. I likely could use the 1.5" seat belt material I have (I got about 70' left) but that is what I used on the Ginkgo, so,,,,,
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
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    A comment about trail damage. The most damage to tracks and paths is caused by water, not foot traffic, not MTBs, not 4x4s. Water is the thing which erodes and moves small stones, gravel and even large rocks. If a track is well drained, damage is less likely. Tracks in upland areas which are steep and have no drainage suffer badly in very heavy rain for obvious reasons.

    As for tree straps, I use Clark ones. 2 inches wide with multi turns. I've never seen any damage to bark after using them

  4. #24
    MedicineMan's Avatar
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    microvascular damage-too deep to see....crushed cambium.
    My test hang site is often between 6x6 salt treated monsters in the carport.
    Even on these I can see compression and more than I'd ever expect.
    The true damage from hangins is not visible to our naked eyes.
    Now I'm looking for some tree huggers like those collars you see used on pit bulls and rottweilers with the sharp pointy things that dig into the neck...aeration is good for the ground and worms right-must be good for trees too

  5. #25
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Sure ...there is a bit of a mark from time to time. Depends on the tree.
    I always figure that I am not clear-cutting or burning forest or tapping for sap or syrup or I'm not a woodpecker digging in for food.
    I feel OK about it as I am not hanging on the same trees over and over....except in my backyard.
    Shug
    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



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  6. #26
    Jsaults's Avatar
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    "I'm not a woodpecker digging in for food."

    How true (not that Shug is a woodpecker - bur WPs do cause damage and tree death). Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers drill holes in healthy trees to attract and capture insects, but by ringing the tree with holes they provide access for microbes. But hey, that is part of nature.

    The comment that a trail creates damage in and of itself is absolutely correct. Any trail is a scar on the land, and creates a path for water to flow and cut.

    The challenge is to construct trails in such a way that water is controlled properly. There is a science to trail building and maintaining that is a fascinating subject on it's own. If you have never participated in trail mainteance with folks who know their "science" I encourage you to volunteer a couple of days this season and do so. I learned my lessons from the International Mountain Bike Association (IMBA) and from USFS and a couple of professional trail builders. It is one of my other hobbies.

    A well-designed trail can be a thing of beauty. Just the right slope for drainage control, broad-based dips for water diversion (self-cleaning!), rolling-crown switchbacks (highly labor intensive) and routed to take in "attractions"...........I sometimes find myself standing and admiring the artistry.

    But where was I going with this? Oh, yeah...We hangers do have the potential for damaging trees. Anything we can do to minimize impact on them is a move in the right direction.

    End of sermon.

    Jim

  7. #27
    Senior Member Law Dawg (ret)'s Avatar
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    Locally we have everyting from Scrub Oak to Ponderosa Pine and even some Redwoods. We also have Aspens that are beautiful for camping and hammock pics. My take from this thread is some trees should be avoided if possible and if not possible careful minimal use is in order.

    What trees should be avoided (like the Aspen) and which are more hardy? Also can we kick around some ideas and even better, actual experience with means to reduce damage? At home I'd probably make some sort of wider strap and maybe even put it over a folded towel (had I suitable hanging trees). Shug, what kind of trees do you have in your backyard and how do they hold up?

    As to LNT the only way to make that happen is to not set a foot in the area...stay out entirely. That is hardly a solution I and most if not all here will embrace. LLT (leave less trace) is most accurate in my opinion. So then how do we hangers/campers make that happen?
    Mark is the name and If there is more than one way to understand what I just said....I meant the good one.

    Earth First! We'll dirt bike ride the other planets later.

  8. #28

    tree damage.

    I have a friend whose home was damaged by an oak tree during a wind storm last summer. There are four overmature aspen trees that are a hazard to the garage and will have to be taken down. I have a one ton Tugit wench, industrial one and a quarter inch straps, plus hammock straps and line. I plan on setting up a test on bark damage once the trees are not dormant. I would appreciate your thoughts on set up and what you want to know.

  9. #29
    Senior Member harrell79cj5's Avatar
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    I am a forester and know a little about tree biology and health , and the only way I can see that it would cause any real damage is if it was left for a very long period of time. The only live part of a tree is the cambium (just inside the bark). Long term compression can cause damage to the cambium, but we aren't going to cause long term compression while on the trail. Just think of how many trees you have seen grown around a barbed wire fence, or even grown around the branch of another tree! Most all of these trees suffer no long term damage to overall health. Trees are very resilient, they have been on earth a long time! Major damage does create orfices for disease and insects to enter the tree, but this kind of damage is not caused by hammocks or tarp lines. I definitely agree that we should all do our part to minimize impacts of any kind, even if they are only visual (such as strap compression marks).

    Just my .02 on the subject.

    Jonathan
    Last edited by harrell79cj5; 03-03-2011 at 14:06.

  10. #30
    Jsaults's Avatar
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    Great info Jonathan!

    Always good to hear from someone who is a pro. We have a lot of discussions based on "collective wisdom" but real science always trumps CW.

    Jim

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