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  1. #41
    Jsaults's Avatar
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    Wider straps, at least in theory

    reduce the pressure per square inch exerted on the bark. Conversely, a narrow strap would increase the pressure per square inch.

    While I agree with your statement: "the logical answer would be to install poles for hammockers to use" in these days of tight budgets we cannot look forward to extra amenities being installed in COE, USFS, NPS or State-run campgrounds. They are cutting back on servicing restrooms!

    So my theory is to be a model hanger. ANd my New Years resolution is to loose weight. And to be the totally swell guy that I already be. (Historical note: "swell" is a term from the 50s and 60s denoting an OK person).

    Jim

  2. #42
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    Swell, noun...one who is fashionably dressed or socially prominent.

    To be serious, I'm in full agreement. The members of HF should set the standard for responsible hanging.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

    It has always been my private conviction that any man who pits his intelligence against a fish and loses has it coming.
    John Steinbeck

  3. #43
    Captn's Avatar
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    Question for GRIZ ... aka, professor hammock.

    So .... does the angle of hang change the amount of force on the back of a tree hugger?

    A 45 degree hang, for example, puts a lot less tension, and therefore normal force, on a tree than a 30 degree hang angle.

    The closer the hang angle to zero the more tension in the lines and therefore a higher normal force on the tree ....

    So ... does this (Griz, this one's for you) equate to more compression on the tree bark by the strap for a lower hang angle?

    Of course the wider the strap the more area the force is spread over, however, I think we must equate the width of straps to the hang angle as well ....

    Interesting questions ......
    Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage
    William Shakespeare


    "Insert witty and intelligent statement here"

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captn View Post
    Of course the wider the strap the more area the force is spread over, however, I think we must equate the width of straps to the hang angle as well .....
    I agree that the angle must make a difference in where the hottest pressure points would be, but wider straps may not change those spots much. Or, because of the irregular surface it's in contact with, it may make it prone to placing heavier loads on more smaller points than a narrower strap or rope.

    I suggest that the wider strap may also spread the damage as well as the load. It's the difference between being whipped with a switch or a paddle. In my own personal experience, they both hurt

    After reading from those who said that wrapping around a tree twice or more seemed to do more damage it makes sense to consider that a wider strap would achieve the same effect.

    So, in the long run, wider straps may end up doing more damage on trees where they are used a lot. I don't know, but I do think that a controlled test would yield some surprising results, especially among a variety of trees. One of them could very well be that using a rope or strap does no significant damage at all to most trees.

    We probably ought to ask our neighbors that have used them for a few centuries. Anyone know what do they do?

  5. #45
    Senior Member perdidochas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillS View Post
    I suggest that the wider strap may also spread the damage as well as the load. It's the difference between being whipped with a switch or a paddle. In my own personal experience, they both hurt
    Yes, but the paddle is much less likely to make a permanent mark than the switch. A switch with a lot of force can scar the skin. A paddle with the same amount of force wouldn't make a permanent mark.

  6. #46
    Two weeks ago, I set up a one ton Tugit wench between two overmature aspen trees that are to be cut. On one side, a one and three quarter inch strap used to sling helicopter loads; while the other side is secured with a flat nylon sling used in mountain climbing anchors. The second set up is with whoppie slings, Bushman's hammock chair, and .9 inch strap. I plan on leaving them up until after they leaf out. I hope to have figured out how to post pictures by that time.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by perdidochas View Post
    Yes, but the paddle is much less likely to make a permanent mark than the switch. A switch with a lot of force can scar the skin. A paddle with the same amount of force wouldn't make a permanent mark.
    I checked. No permanent scars on my behind, but, of course, there are a few on my psyche

    My guess is that there is actually little difference between using a 1" or a 2" strap. I think the reason a rope might cause more damage is because it grips the bark tighter with compression around the edges of the bark's ridges. That, combined with movement in the hammock would cause it to tear at the bark more. A flat strap should lessen that effect. A flat strap with a piece of ccf against the bark might increase it though, acting more like a rope.

    If a flat strap does spread the load and lessen damage, then the width should be increased with the load in the hammock, and a formula for weight/strap width could be worked out.

    In short, there is probably not a "One size fits all" best solution for either people or trees.

    Still, hikers using hammocks is a growing trend and manufacturers would be wise to come up with a "Best Practices" guide based on feedback from botanist and arboriculturist. (Is there any such thing now?)

    I read there were thirty five people at a "Hang" here in the Ozarks a week or two ago (I missed it). These types of events will certainly cause Park Services to evaluate the impact.

    As far as spending money on infrastructure to hang hammocks at campgrounds, I think the cost per unit would be pretty low, as would maintenance, and the life the unit would be quite long. If they can't dig holes and mix bags of redicrete to set poles in, we need a new kind of Park Service employee working for us.

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