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  1. #1
    Senior Member NFA's Avatar
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    Upcoming Kayak Trip W/Hammock

    I'm going on a paddle trip in 2 weeks, for 2.5 days and 2 night.

    We'll be paddling on Lake Champlain, and camping on one of the islands...given the possibility of rough weather/water, I'll be in a kayak with sprayskirt, and rocking a wetsuit (possibly overkill, but why take a chance).

    I haven't been camping out of my kayak before; other paddle-trips have involved my canoe, which can hold a metric crap-ton of gear...my kayak can hold less.

    My question to the HF audience is: how do you pack your gear for a kayak trip, and what is different about what you bring on this kind of trip?

    We'll be expecting water temperatures in the 50s, and air temps from the 60s to the 30s.

    Thanks!

    Jamie - nfa

  2. #2
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    I do quite a bit of kayak camping down here in Florida. If you're used to using a canoe, the main difference in packing into a kayak is that you won't be packing your stuff into containers. Just throw the loose items into the storage areas, and it will fill up the area more efficiently giving you more space. Of course you will want to make sure that the storage area is fairly dry, and that items that are vulnerable to water get stored in a small waterproof bag. Aside from that, if you're doing a simple out and back trip and not touring around with the loaded kayak, then go ahead and load it down. It may be a little tough getting there, but once you arrive, you can unload everything and have an empty kayak to paddle around in.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Go2Stillwater View Post
    ....I do quite a bit of kayak camping down here in Florida.....
    Hey Go2Stillwater,
    I'm out of the Ft Myers area, looking for good places to launch my kayak and hammock gear from for overnighters, and 2-3 night trips. I've been to Palmdale-Fisheating Creek a number of times. Nice place.
    Any recommendations of others worth the trip?

    Thanks,

    -islander

  4. #4
    itsandy's Avatar
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    I paddle many overnighters and extended trips. Pack things that must stay dry (foods, sleeping gear, clothes) in dry bags. Several smaller dry bags are better than big ones. Pack heavier items low and near the center of your kayak. Don't leave room for things to shift. If you have to add dry bags with lots of air in them to fill empty space. Leave air in dry bags with small heavy items. That way they don't sink if they try to go for a swim. Keep your emergency and foul weather gear at hand. You will be amazed at how much stuff can actually fit in your kayak.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Veto 65's Avatar
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    I was surprized at how much stuff I put into my kayak, with no problem. I put every thing in dry bags. There is also the space in front of your feet in the cockpit for storage. If you really had to store on the deck make sure it is light.

    I also found that the heavier the kayak was, the better it tracked, and less weather cocking it had.

    Please post pictures with your trip report and have fun.
    I would feel more optimistic about a bright future for man if he spent less time proving that he can outwit Nature and more time tasting her sweetness and respecting her seniority. - E. B. White (1899 - 1985)

  6. #6
    Debi Jaytee's Avatar
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    Always try to pack stuff in your hatches as opposed to in the cockpit. I don't like anything in the cockpit with me if I can help it.
    As said before, pack necessary dry items (hammock, sleeping bag, etc.) in dry bags and tuck the rest in around them. I've gone for five days in my kayak and everything fits fine. What kind of kayak do you have?
    Debi

  7. #7
    mbiraman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsandy View Post
    I paddle many overnighters and extended trips. Pack things that must stay dry (foods, sleeping gear, clothes) in dry bags. Several smaller dry bags are better than big ones. Pack heavier items low and near the center of your kayak. Don't leave room for things to shift. If you have to add dry bags with lots of air in them to fill empty space. Leave air in dry bags with small heavy items. That way they don't sink if they try to go for a swim. Keep your emergency and foul weather gear at hand. You will be amazed at how much stuff can actually fit in your kayak.
    +1 on what itsandy has said with one added thing, if the water temp is in the fifties and air in the sixties wear your immersion gear especially if the weather looks rough. Have a paddle float and know how to self rescue or have a roll down.
    " The mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

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  8. #8
    Senior Member NFA's Avatar
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    As I said before, I'm mostly a canoe guy, so my kayak is a multi-use job, jack of all trades and master of none...an Old Town Loon 138...it's got a huge cockpit and room in front and behind the cockpit for gear, but no hatches...all gear must be shoved in through the cockpit.

    I'm really looking forward to the trip, and will post pics and an AAR once I return.

    Thanks for all of the helpful posts so far!

    Jamie - nfa

  9. #9
    Bunk's Avatar
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    I have a ww yak but my river tripping is strictly in a canoe so far.

    If you know that you will be in cold weather/water and crossing big lakes/rivers I would highly recommend wearing a drysuit...with appropriate insulation underneath it will keep you warm and dry if you fall out of your kayak.

    I know that drysuits are expensive but if paddling in extreme conditions that involve being in deep water and far from shore I think they are a must.

    As with all gear it would be important to try out a new drysuit before your trip...making sure it does not leak.

    Otherwise, if I'm paddling in cold weather/water I stick to small lakes and rivers where I can get to shore FAST...even then there is risk of hypothermia if not wearing something that will keep you dry.

    Just my 2 cents...enjoy your trip! Look forward to pics!!!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Festus Hagen's Avatar
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    I'm going along on this trip, so I have a vested interest in how this turns out My thinking is, stuff as much as possible behind the seat. A deck bag is ok, but you don't want to strap too much of a bag on the deck... it becomes a sail in the worst way. I plan to use a small deck bag just for stuff I want access to while on the water, but I do have the luxury of hatches and bulkheads.

    Have you ever thought about cutting a hatch into the back and adding a bulkhead? I don't think it would be THAT hard to do... for those perhaps rolling their eyes at the idea, take a look at this picture which is about what NFA's boat looks like. It seems to me the provision is there for adding a hatch... a little cutting, adding a little hardware, and of course you'd have to find the right size hatch cover for sale somewhere, then get a block of foam you can cut to the right size and silicone into place behind the seat.. done!



    <ETA> This might be the droid you're looking for. They don't exactly give 'em away!
    Last edited by Festus Hagen; 10-02-2010 at 08:40.

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