Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32

    Underquilt Ideas

    So I've been thinking about how to make a new down underquilt...trying to maximize warmth and utility and minimize weight. Gonna try some things I haven't done yet, but I wanted to ask a few questions and get your comments on the ideas first.

    1 - Length. I think it's gonna be a half-quilt so I can carry a sit pad/torso pad to use under my legs...maybe 40".

    2 - Width. What's the narrowest underquilt you've used? I think I could get away with ~30" if I had to, but I want a little more comfort than that. But I don't think I want to go over 40". What have y'all used? Advantages/disadvantages?

    3 - Shape. I'm gonna make it a bathtub shape since it's a single-use item. Might even put some shaping into the silnylon layer like the Speer Snug-fit has, but I'm not sure that's needed since it's only a half-quilt. The outer layer will be darted so compression shouldn't be an issue. It might even have an assymetrical shape...even on the DownHammock I see some extra space on the corners that could be trimmed off. Ideas?

    4 - Thickness. Haven't figured this one out yet. I kinda want a 1-1.5" quilt for the warmer seasons here in North Cackalacky, but I also want a really thick one (3.5"?) for cold weather.

    5 - Once I decide on thickness, I'll figure out the baffle pattern. I'd like 3 oz of down per chamber to make future models easier since that's what down comes in. What baffle pattern do you think will work well for a half-underquilt?

    6 - Breathability. I've seen the effects of a simple layer of silnylon with no insulation in warming me up before (my first trip w/ the HH BULA)...I'm gonna make the layer that touches the hammock from grey silnylon to to see if that adds warmth. It'll also keep my body moisture from getting into the down...which means it'll stay in the hammock. Hopefully this won't give me the problems that laying on a CCF pad gives me...if it does, the next model won't use silnylon. I just want to give this one a try to see if sil adds any warmth over DWR - If I get the design right, I might make another from DWR on both sides to see how it works. (Can never have too many underquilts, right? Right?!) Opinions on using the sil like that?

    7 - Elastic? I was thinking about putting some elastic around parts of the perimeter to snug it up, like the Potomac has, only lighter and not adjustable. And not around the whole perimeter. Where are the strategic places to put the minimum amount of elastic to have the maximum effect?

    8 - How would you attach it to the hammock? I'm thinking about sewing small loops to the hammock's edges, then using shockcord/cordlocks to slip through the loops and tighten. That should minimize the length of the shockcord and eliminate heavy biners. Anyone tried this method, or have a better one?

    So this is what I do at night when I can't sleep - lay in bed and think about this stuff. Now you can too!! Help me out here, folks!
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  2. #2
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge, v0.n, where n is large
    Tarp
    depends on season
    Insulation
    DIY UQ
    Posts
    4,628
    Images
    564
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    So I've been thinking about how to make a new down underquilt...trying to maximize warmth and utility and minimize weight. Gonna try some things I haven't done yet, but I wanted to ask a few questions and get your comments on the ideas first.

    2 - Width. What's the narrowest underquilt you've used? I think I could get away with ~30" if I had to, but I want a little more comfort than that. But I don't think I want to go over 40". What have y'all used? Advantages/disadvantages?
    for my DIY bridge I made an underbody that snugs up to the bottom of the hammock, and a cover that holds a quilt up against the underbody. The cover width is 36"; I puff up a 48" wide JRB quilt and have it in a 36" wide space.

    That's enough. I could get by with a narrower width, maybe 34 or 32 inches, if the underbody was fastened to the hammock at the sides like you are suggesting for the quilt. As the underbody is not, it does slide a little up one side or the other as I move, and that's where the "extra" width in 36" comes in handy.


    So this is what I do at night when I can't sleep - lay in bed and think about this stuff.
    well clearly what you need to do is get out and get into your hammock so you sleep!

    Grizz

  3. #3
    Senior Member txulrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Hammock
    ENO Double & HH Expedition
    Tarp
    MacCat Deluxe
    Insulation
    Quilts rule!
    Posts
    262
    Images
    6
    Before you do all the work and sew in the layer of Sil, you might try an experiment to see if it gives you a condensation problem. Throw a layer between an existing quilt and your hammock. If you get wet, you'll know not to use it!!!

    I like the idea of a more custom fit. The downside is that it will only fit that style of hammock. The upside is less weight and a better fit with less air gaps.
    Peace,
    Joe

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    634
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    8 - How would you attach it to the hammock? I'm thinking about sewing small loops to the hammock's edges, then using shockcord/cordlocks to slip through the loops and tighten. That should minimize the length of the shockcord and eliminate heavy biners. Anyone tried this method, or have a better one?
    I was thinking of having loops sewn onto the sides of my Claytor for attaching a UQ or equipment bag, or whatever, but I was wondering if I would first need to sew a length of supporting material along the edge of the hammock or whether I could just sew the loops to the material used for the zipper

  5. #5
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kentucky
    Hammock
    Dual Layer WB Blackbird
    Tarp
    OES Cuben
    Insulation
    SnugFit
    Posts
    6,267
    Images
    35
    1. Is it gonna run from your head to just past you butt?

    2. You are already saving weight by reducing length, so I would not cut yourself short on width. I would probably go for something around 40". That's still about 8-10" less width than most under quilts but it should give you plenty of coverage.

    3. I really think Speer SnugFit is the most effecient design for an under quilt. If you are brave enough, I would attempt a shaped quilt like the SF. You goona run the baffles length-wise or width-wise? You could always have someone lay in the hammock and shape the quilt to fit the occupant. That way you could design it so that unneeded areas of the quilt could be eliminated.

    4. I would go for a thicker quilt because you can always vent the quilt in warmer weather and it would still be usable in cold weather.

    5. I would attempt baffles like the Speer SnugFit, running the length of the hammock. You may also try thicker baffles on the bottom with more down where it's needed, and smaller baffles on the sides.

    6. I'm not a big fan of having a water proof layer directly under me because it can hold moisture and may make for a clammy backside.

    7. Elastic sounds like a good idea. It would make a nice fit.

    8. Your loop and shock cord idea sounds like it would be the easiest way to go.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first, and is waiting for it." -Terry Pratchett



    Premium Quality, Fresh Roasted Coffee
    www.meancatcoffee.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monterey, TN
    Hammock
    DIY Bridge
    Tarp
    DIY Tarps
    Insulation
    Leigh's UQ's
    Posts
    1,715
    Images
    122
    It might even have an assymetrical shape...even on the DownHammock I see some extra space on the corners that could be trimmed off. Ideas?
    I have been working on a down underquilt setup and have many of the same questions. My current project has 2 down baffles on each side with 20" on bottom for pad. I notice when I lay on the asym that a lot of the down baffles are not being used. I am thinking that designing on the asym is going to most efficient and lightest version.

    Looking forward to seeing everyones ideas since I am in the middle of a similar project.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    well clearly what you need to do is get out and get into your hammock so you sleep!
    Clearly...but the wife disagrees that THAT's what I need. Maybe after I convince her to hammock she'll understand...

    Quote Originally Posted by txulrich View Post
    Before you do all the work and sew in the layer of Sil, you might try an experiment to see if it gives you a condensation problem. Throw a layer between an existing quilt and your hammock. If you get wet, you'll know not to use it!!!
    No. That's a stupid idea. Too much common sense - don't you know gear testeres have to make things as difficult as possible?!

    Gonna try it next time I'm in the hammock...thanks pointing out the obvious that I overlooked!

    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    I was thinking of having loops sewn onto the sides of my Claytor for attaching a UQ or equipment bag, or whatever, but I was wondering if I would first need to sew a length of supporting material along the edge of the hammock or whether I could just sew the loops to the material used for the zipper
    I think for an underquilt, you could sew it directly onto the hammock. For a gear bag, it depends on how much weight you put in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by headchange4u View Post
    1. Is it gonna run from your head to just past you butt?

    Yes.

    3. I really think Speer SnugFit is the most effecient design for an under quilt. If you are brave enough, I would attempt a shaped quilt like the SF. You goona run the baffles length-wise or width-wise? You could always have someone lay in the hammock and shape the quilt to fit the occupant. That way you could design it so that unneeded areas of the quilt could be eliminated.

    I was thinking of having three down chambers, maybe running lengthwise. Maybe even cut on a differential. And the middle chamber will have more down than the side ones. Still figuring this out, though.

    I've given some thought to the inner layer of the SnugFit. Not sure it's needed for a half-quilt, though - the air gaps under the legs won't be a problem and that's the biggest advantage to the Speer style. Maybe a little bit under the back? We'll see...
    Good comments, y'all...keep 'em coming! Hopefully I'll find some times over the holidays to at least make this...maybe even test it! But all the time I wait to make it can go into thinking about the design. But not while I'm at work...never that.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,557
    I want to attempt the same thing with Climashield, basically a 3/4 KAQ. Patrick's site says that someone has done this and thru'd the AT with it. I always thought the JRB's were wider than necessary, though I agree with Headchange that 40in would be a good width.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Hammock
    Blackbird
    Tarp
    MacCat Standard
    Insulation
    Winter Yeti, MWUQ4
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    8,012
    Images
    32
    Yeah - 40" might be about right. I like to lay on my back with my legs bent and feet together so my knees raise up and rest on the sides of the hammock. If I'm on a pad my legs get cold b/c there's no side insulation, but I think a 40" quilt would be just enough to keep them warm. Plus it would be a little less finnicky on setup.

    Since I started carrying a sit pad, I see no reason for a full-length underquilt. I don't get the condensation issues on my legs that I get on my torso when I sleep on a CCF pad, and since CCF is lighter and multi-use, it's a good fit for my style. Right now, at least - I'm sure I'll find something else to tinker with as soon as I'm satisfied with this system!
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
    - Designer, Jeff's Gear Hammock / Pack Cover by JRB

    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  10. #10
    I made a "mini sized" underquilt from some leftover material from a Ray-Way quilt kit. It ended up being about 36 inches wide. I wish it was about 6 inches wider, but it works OK. It was originally a "just below my butt" length pad. I ended up adding about a foot to the length so my then 8 year old could use it as a full length underquilt. He still uses it now at 12, but has to use a pad from the knees down.

    I made it sort of shaped like the old west coffins (6 sided shape), but with the widest part at the hips instead of at the head. I added loops and bungee cords to let me form fit it to the hammock. It worked pretty well.

    If I was making it again, I would:

    1) make it in 2 sections that could be velcroed together to make a full length underquilt when needed.
    2) definately make it 40-42 inches wide.
    3) put a channel at the head and foot ends with a drawstring in it to let me snug it to the hammock a little easier than the loop and bungee method.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •