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  1. #1
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Instructions: The Hug - Hammock Half Bug Net

    Bug nets are an essential part of most hammock systems, but for a while now I've been trying to find a bug net that accomplishes a few things:

    • Lightweight, packs small
    • Easy exit and entry
    • Works with other hammock components (e.g., ridglines, underquilts, etc.)
    • Inexpensive


    I've been playing with bug net options for a while. I started off with the built-in net on my Hennessy, and when I moved to end-gathered hammocks,I built a full-length bug net; I've even tried using minimalist nets like the Equinox Mantis Sleep Net. Each of these styles has pros and cons, but none easily fit my criteria.

    Often, when camping with my kids, I'm called in the middle of the night for one reason or another. Getting stuck in a bug net is maddening, whether helping my kids, or when I have my own needs.

    Enter the HUG, or half bug net.

    The HUG uses a simple design that I've been tweaking for a while. It is meant to be simple but effective, leveraging other components of a hammock sleep system for not only total bug protection, but also for a lightweight, easy entry/exit, and "plays well" netting solution.

    LIGHTWEIGHT
    The HUG is purposely minimalist in design. It assumes that I will be using some sort of quilt, blanket, or sheet as a top quilt; and it takes advantage of my bottom quilt (or pad) that protects my back. The simple design, optional finishing touches, and reduced fabric make this a very light bug net.

    EASY ENTRY/EXIT
    The HUG has no zippers, uses no draw-strings, or hook-and-loop closures to seal the net. Like many minimal ground nets (like the Mantis), extra netting drapes down over my legs and can tuck around my sides. Using my sleeping bag, quilt, sheet, or blanket as filler, this design will stop all but the most ingenious flying bugs. But most important of all, the draped fabric makes exit as simple as kicking my legs out of my hammock and standing up. No searching for zipper pulls or reaching for draw cords. Just get out! Getting in is as simple as pulling the net over my head.

    PLAYS WELL
    The hook-and-loop (or omni tape) end attachment makes it a snap to wrap the HUG around one end of a hammock, whether or not the hammock has a fixed ridgeline. A simple toggle system brings shock cord around the bottom of the hammock, securing it. The interior of the HUG is raised by a single adjustment point that can attach to a ridgeline, or clip to the opposite end of a hammock. The toggles mean simple, effective attachments, and the cord locks provide easy adjustments.

    Under quilts fit easily over the HUG, not only providing necessary bug protection for the bottom of the hammock, but adding additional sealing power to the sides of the netting. Top quilts, sleeping bags, blankets, or sheets easily fit in the HUG and provide additional "filler" to seal up any openings, but also provide the bug protection for my legs.

    INEXPENSIVE
    The HUG uses very little material, and most of the components can be taken from extra material on hand. I bought 2 yards of no-see-um netting, but the rest of the hardware and cordage I had on hand -- I only needed a few scraps. For a "finished" look, grosgrain can be added around the edges, but with a good heat-cut edges, this is nearly unnecessary.



    I've been sitting on this design for a few months now and I finally had some time to finish the sketch. I'll upload some action photos, perhaps tomorrow.

    Good night!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Kanguru's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Nice...

    ...you do very nice drawings and instructions.
    Gentle raindrops and mighty oceans...neither can exist without the other.
    Time heals all wounds...but it usually leaves a pretty big scar.

  3. #3
    sclittlefield's Avatar
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    Really great write up dejoha. I like simple! I love how clear your illustrations are - they make projects really easy to do.
    DIY Gear Supply - Your source for DIY outdoor gear.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rjcress's Avatar
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    Great design.
    I love the ease of exit.

    Thanks for sharing!
    "I keep telling myself that if I make perfect seams, nobody will believe that I made it... " -JohnSawyer

    My outdoor gear review site http://gear-report.com
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Sarae's Avatar
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    Very excellent! I may have to try this as my first hammock related project. Exciting!

  6. #6
    Senior Member CajunHiker's Avatar
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    For the fixed ridgeline setup, could you just place a toggle on the ridgeline and pass the ridgeline through the pinhole? Or does there have to be shock cord for strain relief?
    I like having access to the ridgeline for storage.
    Last edited by CajunHiker; 10-29-2010 at 09:34.
    To Boldly Hang Where No One Has Hung Before...

  7. #7
    Senior Member GvilleDave's Avatar
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    Fantastic idea / drawing / instruction. I have a simple gathered end that I have struggled using a full bug sock with and this will be an easy solution. Thanks!

  8. #8
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CajunHiker View Post
    For the fixed ridgeline setup, could you just place a toggle on the ridgeline and pass the ridgeline through the pinhole? Or does there have to be shock cord for strain relief?
    I like having access to the ridgeline for storage.
    Yes, you could, but the HUG may not be big enough to "hug" your hammock. The width of the HUG is the limiting factor since it is only 55 inches wide.

    The shock cord does provide some strain relief.

    All you would need to do is make the HUG a little wider. You could thread your ridge line through the pin hole (actually, I would punch in a grommet in that case; a toggle would seal the hole).

  9. #9
    RootCause's Avatar
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    I like it! The full-hammock bugnet has never been a huge draw for me, so I like your solution.

    I do something similar, but decidedly low-rent. I take a cheap mosquito net
    and drape it over my ridgeline at my head. One or two binder clips
    hold it where I want it, and I can flip it out of the way as needed. I do enough spring/fall camping that bugs are not a problem most of time, even in Minnesota!

  10. #10
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    I like it! It's just that a few of the places I've been have been quite warm and buggy, and this net would not work very well there (no leg/back protection). I can see this working in cooler temps where you'll have the quilts for leg protection.

    I've got a full bugnet tube, and I love being able to get out from under covers on those warmer nights.


    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
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