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  1. #1
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    Diy Stove Jack??

    i have bought in the past from titanium goat a siliconized fiberglass stove jack that you could use to sew into tents and be able to use a wood burning stove in. my question is, is that i wonder if a person would be able to use a fiberglass matt and imerse it in a solution of clear silicone and mineral spirits and let it soak in and absorb into the matt and end up with a product similar to titanium goat s jack that they sell??? mabe ol "TURK" might know sounds like he has experimented with fire once or twice in his home made heated hammock tent? would rather make it my self than pay someone else for something similar.
    tim

  2. #2
    Senior Member NCPatrick's Avatar
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    Actually, Turk recently modified the large 'proof of concept' version of the soon to be released (January?) JRB Tarp Tent... but hopefully he can still help you out there.


    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
    - Mark Twain
    I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.
    - John Burroughs

  3. #3
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    I think TI Goat's stove jack is only $35, you're gonna risk burning all your gear up to save $35?

  4. #4
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    yep prollay a safer bet to buy one than burn up my gear or worse yet the whole forrest!!

  5. #5
    Senior Member TeeDee's Avatar
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    If you are impatient about shipping, Lowes sells fire blockers, called Oatey Flame Protector in Polybag, $15.00. In the plumbing section. Plumbers place it behind pipes to protect wood from the flame when sweating joints in copper. It's 9" x 12". That should be big enough. I use it under wood burning back-packing stoves to prevent scorching the ground. Pick it up, shake it off and pack it when the fire has burned out. Nobody will ever be able to tell you were there.

  6. #6
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    thanks TEEDEE thats a good idea, but i guess what i was trying to do was to be able to make a stove jack from scratch on my own. im guess im just a super tight wad that thinks that if someone can make something so easy and sell it, then i wana make one and save my money!!
    tim

  7. #7
    Senior Member kohburn's Avatar
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    some things are just better off left to mass production (including to save money)

  8. #8
    Senior Member turk's Avatar
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    For safety if you were going to make a homemade stove jack I would say for a stainless steel chimney, I would personally want a fabric that can withstand direct contact with 700+ deg F. If you were using a titanium chimney I would want a fabric that could withstand a minimum 1000 deg F.

    The plumbers heat shields Teedee suggested are awesome. I am a plumber myself, and I use them everyday. Good quality heat shields or gloves can withstand aprox 1200 deg F. If you are more concerned with safety and less concerned with weight I highly recommend a welders apron. They are good to 2300+ degrees, but the final weight of your stove jack will be about double. And it costs more to buy a welders apron than it does to buy an already made titanium goat stove jack. Only a good idea if you have access to like a used, or ripped one for real cheap.

    I am not trying to deter you from exploring the DIY possibilities. If you do find some fabric or product that is both cheaper than the titanium goat jack, or has higher heat resistance.... please share! So far, every time I come up with a good idea, ..I soon realize that titanium goat has already done it better, and cheaper. But that is not to say, the perfect DIY substitute fabric isn't out there.

    All said and done. Titanium goat makes an excellent product. The whole system has been refined. Have you seen the new system of stove jacks TG is offering? If not, do check it out. The new model is crazy awesome. I don't have one yet. But I am hoping to order a couple by end of December. Not only do they have all the features of the original, but you can now swap out the centre section to acomodate different sizes of chimneys if you use more than one stove in the same tent.

    What ever way you go. TG, or homemade version... please allow me to extend these 2 tips:
    1. - Cut your chimney hole absolutely perfect. I wasted 2 TG stove jacks before I got the hole right dialed in perfect. No more than 1/8" dia. larger than your chimney pipe. Any bigger and rain or snow can get down your stove jack hole, and bounce off your hot stove or chimney just like a skillet and burn you badly. I learned this the hard way Also a tight fit.... means you don't need to build a separate fire-proof tie-out system for the chimney just for ultra high winds. ...like hand-of-god type weather.

    2. - If you make a separate rain flap for when you aren't using any stove, consider keeping it a completely separate and removeable component. I ignored the titanium goat instructions for installation, and made my silnylon rain flap a separate component, because in high winds, I am not going to trust a velcro seal to keep the flammable rain flap away from the hot chimney pipe.
    Last edited by turk; 12-06-2007 at 01:47.

  9. #9
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    holy smokes!! thanks for such an informative repy to my post TURK. i have not seen the tig new stove jack options for this year. but for sure will be checking them out i did try to make a jack out of some silica cloth i bought online but after reading some information on the health aspects of breathing in smoke or fumes from heated silica cloth i opted out for using this for my jack material. again thanks for the reply
    tim

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