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  1. #11
    Senior Member whayneneal's Avatar
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    If you look under hammocks, he has a tarp for hammocks. I have been looking at the Cuben.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Yes that is the idea

    Quote Originally Posted by KerMegan View Post
    and if he should end up caught by darkness in a place with no trees, can still use it as primary shelter with hiking pole (or use trekking poles) to hold up center point..Multipurpose!
    KM(who is deliberately not saying GTG..)
    Yes, that is the idea. We have here some wilderness parks where there are spectacular open hill areas without trees and and also spectacular old forests with small rivers and ponds. With TrailStar, simple CCF-pad, Black mamba over quilt and WBBB I can hike all the park area without need for extra stuff.

    Also when there is bad weather it is fast to put up TrailStar anywhere for lunch break and eat under shelter.

    These are not my images, but to get the idea. They are all from UKK national park. First one is Paratiisikuru (Paratiisikuru means Paradise valley). The second one is from the tree and river zone. There is also great spruce tree zone (third image).







    I have been playing with the idea to use the WBBB as a bug bivi. Those side lines could be used as a hanging loops to keep the netting away ones face, the shelf side one to the center pole and the zipper side one to the TrailStars underside hanging point for example or just use a clothespin over my face area.

    But I will probably end up with this pyramid bug tent. That would be extra weight, but not too much (and probably will end up with Exped synmat 9 dlx pump also, comfort is good for you when hiking). I first have to make some measurements when springtime comes. If this combo (TrailStar + pyra net 2) works well I will sell my two Hilleberg tents away.

    http://www.bearpawtents.com/pyranet2.html

    Last edited by voivalin; 12-28-2010 at 01:02.

  3. #13

    Join Date
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    First outing with TrailStar

    Temperature 20 F. No wind. Winter yeti + Winter black mamba + 0,55 inch pad (no need for pad, just testing the concept).

    It seems to be good option for a normal tarp. But setting it up is still bit hard, had to dig those snow pegs twice to get them in to the right spot. It is real 3D thinking exercise to try to see forehand where will those corners lie.

    Otherwise set up is easy, as seen on images at the start of this thread. In summertime I would put it up so that the two down corners would be at the back side of the Blackbird and the single corner to the front side and also it could be higher from ground to maximize the view.

    The weight of the TrailStar is practically same as Warbonnet Edge SpinUL with doors (16 oz vs 15,4 oz) but coverage is better and so is living space.
    Edge's doors block wind from foot or head end and in that sense Edge with doors would be better than TrailStar.

    The peculiar shape of the TrailStar gives it it's unique ability to be hanged low for maximal protection without compromising living space under it (At least when there is lots of snow). And support at central apex will help avoiding snow or water accumulation even if the slope is quite low. I first tried to hang sides steeper but there was too much loose fabric at the sides, maybe extra material could be used as a doors but we will see.

    Sorry for a quite bundle of images, but at least for me to comprehend the shape of the TrailStar in my head is very hard, so maybe there are others also...


    The hanging distance was quite long. There is bit over 26 feet between those trees. I wanted to test the worst case scenario. It is hard to pitch tarp low if the hammock suspension needs to be hanged high. In this sense test was also success.




    These extra lines to the pulk poles where the first test to form doors, but in this case the TrailStar is too tight pitched it to succeed.










    The ridge line of the hammock is on contact with tarp, but only when there is nobody in the hammock. And there was no real problem with snow accumulation after the support of the ridge line was lost. But snow fall during night was not very big and it was dry snow so future will tell.










    The tarp line was attached to the biner, it worked also surprisingly well.



























    And now some interior images.


    A good view (better than with normal tarp) to the out, this is foot end.


    This is head end view. Notice that hammock suspension and ridge line is now a way under the tarp.


    Head room just where one needs it most and good protected space for pulk, cooking and gear handling.




    Enough space for the legendary 'foot box'.


    Space, space and some more space above my head.

    Thanks for watching!
    Last edited by voivalin; 01-21-2011 at 13:25.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
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    Cool. Gives you a lot of different setup options. In the warmer months you could prop that bad boy up high with a center pole, hang slightly off center and have a ton of protected space underneath with wide open views. I've looked at the TS quite a few times and read most of the Google available reviews, but you're the first I've seen that has used it with a hammock. Good job!

  5. #15

    Join Date
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    More experience about TrailStar

    I had a two night trip at lake area called Linnansaari. First night I did something I have been wanting to test a very long time - camping on ice.

    It was already dark when I did put up TrailStar. This was the first time I had ever used it at ground level. Wind was blowing 4-5 m/s (13-16 feet/second) and temperature was -7 C (19,4 F). So nothing very special there when outing at lake ice.



    It does not look very good but there were some complications. Not enough snow for snow pegs, so I had to use skis and snowshoes for those five main guy lines. And placing those correctly at first time was not totally successful, and repeating the placement process again was too tiresome idea, so I was satisfied with this look.

    Also my ski poles were too long (160 cm, 62 inch) and I was forced to use A-frame type solution to get the height low enough, but that was not totally successful and due to that there was constant wind blowing through my shelter during night.

    But anyhow it was quite nice to stop and put up shelter directly above pulk and after that go in and change gear and make a bed for myself. (There was jus enough room for big guy - 190 cm, 6.3 feet - and winter gear.) When using tent one must take out stuff from pulk and move it in to the tent. And usually something is always forgotten outside.

    Here are some images from the morning when the inside of the camp was revealed.





    During days travel I did think a better way to put up the TrailStar so that one side should stay at ground lever for better wind protection. By using skis as a attachment frame at the wind side this could be achieved.



    My friend joined to the party at the second day.







    Then some snow over skis and the TrailStar and padding with shovel.



    And crash test dummy fits right in!



    View from outside.



    Now some images from our hammock camp.





    This was taken at the morning, tarp is still as taunt it was when I did put it up.



    So, TrailStar is not a simple toy, but I'm going to keep using it. Now there is the Pentanet 2 at BearBaw Wilderness Designs that will keep bugs out at summer time. Also it will help with the wind issues, no need to use the TrailStar at ground level when ordering Pentanet with optional 10 inch silnyl sides at ground level.

    http://www.bearpawwd.com/shelters_floors/pentaNet2.html

    Thanks for Your interest!
    Last edited by voivalin; 03-12-2011 at 11:09.

  6. #16
    Senior Member catalyst's Avatar
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    Thanks

    Interesting write up. I'm planning on making a DIY tarp, but I may have to try my trailstar out as well.

  7. #17

    Join Date
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    Not really Hammocking this time

    But because almost all snow is gone by now I tested TrailStar as a dinner break shelter with BushCooker (BushBuddy in America). Highest beak is attached to our dogs run wire but in forest there would probably be a suitable tree branch in about same hight (or one could just use tree trunk). Idea is that wind is coming from back side of the shelter. Setup was easy. First those two back corners almost to the ground level and then the beak to the wire. And after that all other guy lines.

    The trekking pole is adjusted to it's highest position 145 cm (57 inch), and when about 5 cm goes in to the ground the highest point in the center of the shelter is about 140 cm (55 inch). Two guys with gear can easily sit and enjoy meal and keep themselves dry from the rain, and there is also room for few dogs if need.

    Pics taken with iPhone.









    Thanks for watching!

    P.S. I did measure the weight of the TrailStar with guylines and seam sealing, it is 800 g (28 oz). And ground pegs (the set MLD is selling with the shelter) weight 126 g (4.5 oz). The Leki Sierra-FS weights 286 g (10 z).
    Last edited by voivalin; 04-21-2011 at 04:08.

  8. #18

    Join Date
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    I hope this does not get too boring

    More pics about TrailStar. It starts to be my weapon of choice for any use at any season. Here are just some images of my test to use it at rocky area as a lunch shelter.

    One can not do this with tent or normal hammock tarp (at least it is not as easy with normal hammock tarp).

    Every tie out is 2 m long. And there are 10 of those. If needed, as in this case , I can take the non used ones out and tie a longer rope for special use. So, no need for extra "just in case"-ropes.

    I used MSR groundhog style pegs. It was quite easy to jam them between or under rocks like anchors.








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