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  1. #1
    Mule's Avatar
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    Webbing or Spectra?

    What setup do you all use to hang and what would you recommend to a Newby?
    I just started using my cinch buckles recently. I made a short 3 foot section on each side of the hammock to give me plenty of adjustment. The last time I went on an over night trip I used the short webbing and a biner to spectra rope. Well, I hate to cut rope so each side had like 25 feet, a real waste of weight, and worse, a real hassle to use between fairly close trees.
    Now I have replaced that small length of webbing with a 15 foot length of webbing on each side, no rope, but I think the weight might actually have increased a bit, not much.
    If you were setting it up how would you go and why. Thank you for sharing your experience.
    Mule
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  2. #2
    Senior Member headchange4u's Avatar
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    I use a piece 1.5' piece of Spectra on each end of the hammcok, that goes from the hammock to the cinch buckle that I use. Then there I use 10' of webbing on each end to go from the buckle to the tree.

    Webbing is a little heavier than Spectra but it's easier to use, IMHO.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    Poly straps, Trek Light biners, and rings or buckles. I still prefer the rings, but it may just be me being sentimental. I use 12' on each end and haven't had any problems finding a suitable sites.

    I've been using the strapworks webbing and very much like it; zero stretch. However, I just got an order of the camo webbing from OWF (lighter). I haven't hung from it yet, but the weekend is coming up pretty quick.

    Why? Because of the ease of use, the limiting of damage to trees, and the reliability.

  4. #4
    Mule's Avatar
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    Looks like I am just taking too much of everything

    I appreciate your ideas. I have virtually no one else around these parts that hammock camps who has any experience, so I could go for months without seeing some small detail that would make hammock camping even better. I think I will stay with my 15 foot webbing on each side. I agree it is easier to use. Mule
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
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  5. #5
    Mule's Avatar
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    Looks like I am just taking too much of everything

    I appreciate your ideas. I have virtually no one else around these parts that hammock camps who has any experience, so I could go for months without seeing some small detail that would make hammock camping even better. I think I will stay with my 15 foot webbing on each side. I agree it is easier to use. Mule
    There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and the enemy. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion.
    Gen. William Thornson, U.S. Army

  6. #6
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    Skskinner, I'm in a similar situation. Just trying to figure out a good length for my webbing before I buy it. I've been carrying around heavy climbing webbing in various lengths to try, on my day hikes, and it just convinces me I need some lightweight poly (ester, probably) webbing!

  7. #7
    Senior Member TiredFeet's Avatar
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    If you don't mind the extra weight and bulk, then webbing isn't a bad way to go, but webbing is like almost 4 times heavier than good rope of an equal rating. It is also many times that more bulky.

    I use the Carabiner Hitch that Grizz pointed me to over on Rock's site. I think Take-A-Knee recently wrote that he uses that also.

    The rope is more expensive than the webbing, but the Carabiner Hitch is just as easy to use according to the guy on Rock's site that ditched webbing for rope. I've been using it now and it is easy. But then if you are using a Hennessy, the rope comes with the hammock and the Carabiner hitch requires zero modification to the setup so you don't have to cut that rope.

  8. #8
    Senior Member pure_mahem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiredFeet View Post
    If you don't mind the extra weight and bulk, then webbing isn't a bad way to go, but webbing is like almost 4 times heavier than good rope of an equal rating. It is also many times that more bulky.

    I use the Carabiner Hitch that Grizz pointed me to over on Rock's site. I think Take-A-Knee recently wrote that he uses that also.

    The rope is more expensive than the webbing, but the Carabiner Hitch is just as easy to use according to the guy on Rock's site that ditched webbing for rope. I've been using it now and it is easy. But then if you are using a Hennessy, the rope comes with the hammock and the Carabiner hitch requires zero modification to the setup so you don't have to cut that rope.
    Any pics or links to this carabiner hitch? Thank you in advance!

  9. #9
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mahem View Post
    Any pics or links to this carabiner hitch? Thank you in advance!
    I answered skar578's same question a few days ago. Response post is
    here.

    You have to use your imagination a little because it's not exactly the hitch to the tree.

    But the idea is dead simple. Put a carbiner on your rope a couple of feet away from the carbiner at the ends of your tree huggers (or webbing). You can "clip" the carbiner onto the rope simply, with a lark's head. Now you put the working end of the rope through the huggers' carbiner, and bring back to the biner you put on the rope, loop it through that, and bring the rope back to the webbing. You can tighten the rope, enjoying mechanical advantage, and tie it off.


    Grizz

  10. #10
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW View Post
    Skskinner, I'm in a similar situation. Just trying to figure out a good length for my webbing before I buy it. I've been carrying around heavy climbing webbing in various lengths to try, on my day hikes, and it just convinces me I need some lightweight poly (ester, probably) webbing!
    12' of polyester webbing per side is what I use. Seems to be a popular number.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

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