Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 12 of 12
  1. #11
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Milton, PA
    Hammock
    Hennessey Explorer Ultralight
    Tarp
    Hennessey Hex
    Insulation
    HH Super Shelter
    Suspension
    ring buckle
    Posts
    7,298
    Images
    101
    A serger can not do what the standard thread injector can do. With a standard machine you can sew baffles on the interior of a quilt. That is not possible with a serger. At best the stitches would be wrong for the application creating a bulk that would be undesirable. At worst, the cutting blades of the serger could not be disabled and you would end up slicing your your quilt into nice smooth strips that are sewn together. If you can only have one machine... opt for a traditional sewing machine. If you want to splurge and add another machine to your arsenal go for the serger. But for the money you are better off using the traditional machine over the serger.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  2. #12
    silentorpheus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Hammock
    WBBB & DIY
    Tarp
    WB Edge, Superfly
    Insulation
    Crowsnest/Burrow
    Suspension
    Webbing/Whoopies
    Posts
    1,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Gqgeek81 View Post
    Let me ask this a different way.

    If one had a only a serger could they make gear with it or would you have to have a regular thread injector as well?


    I have been told they excel at stretchy fabrics of which we only use a few (and can make do with on a normal machine) and from another that they are really just for edges that fray of which I'm not sure we mess too much with???


    I get the impression the two machines are almost always used the way a construction professional would use two power drills. One setup for screws, and the other for the pilot holes even though they could really do the same job if you wanted to take the time to change setups for every hole or job.
    Compare that to say a set of pitchforks and a shovel, they are kind of similar but not really interchangeable at all.
    Or maybe I'm way off base?
    I would think that having ONLY a serger would be very limiting in what you could make. A serger is an overlock stitch machine, as opposed to a standard lockstitch machine. With a serger you may or may not be able to sew a flat felled seam, and I definitely don't think you can do bar tacking or any other zig-zag stitching. Basic seams, hems, etc. are fine, but that's only half of what one normally needs to do.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •