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  1. #1
    Member ame's Avatar
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    Hand-sewn webbing

    Hi,

    Can anyone comment on the general safety of hand-sewn versus machine-sewn webbing? I want to make some tree straps to support me in my hammock (based on the ring-buckle supports design at JustJeff's page), but I don't have a sewing machine. I can hand-stitch the webbing to make a loop at the end, but I have no idea of its durability. If it's not recommended to hand-sew then I can probably borrow the use of a sewing machine, but that will be quite a difficult proposition.

    Thanks,

    A

  2. #2
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    You can probably get by with handsewn, but you'll have to do A LOT of hand stitches through some thick material so it'll take a while. Be sure to pull the stitches really tight so the webbing doesn't slip and cause a sawing motion against the thread.

    But personally I'd just take it to an alterations shop and pay the $10 to get it done. Two overlapping x-boxes and you know it'll hold.

    You might make sure the end loops are big enough to slide a ring through it in case you ever want to convert to some sort of ring buckle system.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

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  3. #3
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    I would be happy to sew the loops for you, not sure its worth the postage though?

    Quote Originally Posted by ame View Post
    Hi,

    Can anyone comment on the general safety of hand-sewn versus machine-sewn webbing? I want to make some tree straps to support me in my hammock (based on the ring-buckle supports design at JustJeff's page), but I don't have a sewing machine. I can hand-stitch the webbing to make a loop at the end, but I have no idea of its durability. If it's not recommended to hand-sew then I can probably borrow the use of a sewing machine, but that will be quite a difficult proposition.

    Thanks,

    A

  4. #4
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    I sewn through webbing on a pack by hand a couple of times. Not very much fun. It held, but not nearly as strong as a machine seam. I think I mirror what Jeff says on this one.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
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  5. #5
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    What is the advantage of the 'biner with a loop in the strap vs. plain strap with no loops and using a round turn and two half hitches? Is it just speed of setup? Is it ability to use a shorter strap?

    I use the plain strap approach and have been happy with it - no 'biner and no sewing.

    WRT hand sewing straps - if I had to I would use a rather heavy thread such as the inner threads from some 550 cord. I have several sail maker's needles (heavy triangular) and a sail maker's palm to help push the needle through the straps. It would be still not as good as machine sewn and it would take probably about an hour to do.

  6. #6
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hog On Ice View Post
    What is the advantage of the 'biner with a loop in the strap vs. plain strap with no loops and using a round turn and two half hitches? Is it just speed of setup? Is it ability to use a shorter strap?

    I use the plain strap approach and have been happy with it - no 'biner and no sewing.
    Ah yes, simplicity, low cost, low weight! Interesting, indeed. I will have to look into this.

    It would use an extra tree diameter's worth of webbing, but this could be compensated for a bit with slightly longer webbing which would probably weigh less than the biner any way. And that one to three feet of webbing would only be important if you expected few trees that were not either quite large and/or a bit far apart.

    There would be some time lost compared to just going around the tree once and clipping into a biner. But really, what are we talking about, 10 or 20 seconds?

  7. #7
    Member ame's Avatar
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    Ok, well it has been too difficult to get the machine-sewing option underway (not least because my Japanese is not quite up to it). So, I have started sewing my straps by hand.

    I am going to set up the hammock using the ring buckle system described on JustJeff's page. At each end of the hammock I will have the following items:

    2.5m of 25mm PP webbing with loop hand-sewn in one end (13cm overlap with two 5cm 'X' boxes and 2.5cm loop)
    Trango SuperFly wire gate carabiner in the loop
    Two 35mm steel rings
    1m of 4mm cord rated to 620kg (with figure 8 on a bight loops at each end)
    1m of 20mm PP webbing formed into a loop through the hammock ends with 15cm overlap hand-stitched (three 5cm 'X' boxes)

    The loop at one end of the cord goes in a larkshead around the rings. The loop at the other end of the cord goes in a larkshead around the stitched joint in the 20mm webbing.

    I have to use webbing in the hammock end as the cord is too thin and would probably tear through. The disadvantage of my solution is that this webbing loop is permanently sewn into the end of the hammock and the only way to undo it is to rip the stitching.

    While I am using this setup I will examine the webbing every time. When I get access to a sewing machine I will oversew the hand stitching. I have sewn one loop so far (it does take a while), and it looks pretty good. I will test it by hanging my weight vertically from it from a beam.

    How exciting.

    A

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