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Thread: SS pad thought

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    Joey's Avatar
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    SS pad thought

    In regards to the SS... would not a Radiant reflective bubble pad work better than the standard pad with space blanket? You wouldn't have to worry about the pad remaining covered, etc....

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    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Cross View Post
    In regards to the SS... would not a Radiant reflective bubble pad work better than the standard pad with space blanket? You wouldn't have to worry about the pad remaining covered, etc....
    Maybe inside the hammock, though I don't really know if it would be as comfortable. I also don't know how the relative warmth would compare, I'm sure it would depend on the thickness of the bubble pad. But I have always found that HH space blanket/pad/UC system to be much warmer than it looks like it should be.

    But I doubt it would work as well outside of the hammock like the HH pad is used. Which is what makes for equal to UQ comfort. First, you would have to figure out a way to rig it of course. But even then, the HH pad is both completely flexible and shaped similar to an occupied hammock. So it contacts your back while more or less assuming the shape of you body, especially the shoulders. I'm not sure a bubble pad would do that.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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    Joey's Avatar
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    Thanks. Just trying to come up with some way to ensure the space blanket stays over the pad. A radiant reflective pad is fully covered, but I agree that it more than likely doesn't have the same insulation ability.

    Any thoughts on how to ensure a space blanket stays over a pad for restless sleepers?

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    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Have you been having trouble keeping one in place? Once I am in the hammock, mine has always stayed pretty well where I started, for the most part. It might wander a bit at the edges or on the foot end, not perfect. But it stays under me perfectly.

    I have considered just running a couple of stitches through pad and SB just to make things behave more perfectly, but so far have never bothered. I think one person cut a sp.B. to shape and sewed it on at the edges.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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    Joey's Avatar
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    The SB came off near my head, and I ended up with a touch of frost on the pad my last outing. I did go back/side/back/side a few times. I've been considering ways to keep the SB permanently in place.

    The radiant reflective pad idea came from HH website. It comes with the Jungle hammock. I am curious to it's insulating properties. I may pick one up to test for spring/fall use, and see what temps it can handle. I think I'll go to Lowe's and see if they have a wide enough cut.

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    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Cross View Post
    The SB came off near my head, and I ended up with a touch of frost on the pad my last outing. I did go back/side/back/side a few times. I've been considering ways to keep the SB permanently in place.
    Well, you might just try a stitch or 2 at each corner of the pad/sb.

    The radiant reflective pad idea came from HH website. It comes with the Jungle hammock. I am curious to it's insulating properties. I may pick one up to test for spring/fall use, and see what temps it can handle. I think I'll go to Lowe's and see if they have a wide enough cut.
    OK, that is different. I thought you were talking about using in the SS as a replacement for the HH pad(maybe you were?). That Deep Jungle pad is meant to go between the double layer of the DJ hammock. I don't know how flexible that pad is, but it might work well right on top of the HHSS OCF pad, while also functioning as a vapor barrier.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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    Senior Member Silverlion's Avatar
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    I tried the foil wrapped bubble stuff this past weekend. My butt never got warm. I used it in conjunction with the OCF pad. Fail. I went right back to the E-blanket and immediately warmed up. As far as having it stay put, I wrap the edges around the OCF and never had an issue.
    We must all learn to live together as brothers--or we will all perish together as fools. MLK

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Silverlion View Post
    I tried the foil wrapped bubble stuff this past weekend. My butt never got warm. I used it in conjunction with the OCF pad. Fail. I went right back to the E-blanket and immediately warmed up. As far as having it stay put, I wrap the edges around the OCF and never had an issue.
    I have used the reflectix with success. IMHO it is best used as close to the body as possible. In the hammock, in an SPE in the hammock or in between the dual layer. If you have it below the hammock and not touching it just becomes a layer and isn't capturing the heat from your body to reflect back at you....

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    Senior Member Silverlion's Avatar
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    I had it between the OCF pad and the bottom of the hammock in place of the SB. It wasn't reflectix, it was a similar foil covered bubble windshield reflector. The more I use the SB, the less noise it makes. It doesn't bother me anymore.
    We must all learn to live together as brothers--or we will all perish together as fools. MLK

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    Senior Member Slo's Avatar
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    Auto windshield heat reflector pad

    There are several types of auto windshield reflector pads. Some are folded cardboard with foil on one or both sides, some are a double layer of bubble wrap with a layer of aluminum foil laminated to each side and my favorite has 1/8” polyethylene foam with a piece of space blanket laminated to one side only.They come in all different sizes depending on the size of vehicle windshield. They will roll up to almost 2” in diameter and are around 4.5 oz. One nifty trick is to put this pad inside your sleeping bag so that it will stay aligned to your sleeping bag. If it does need a little adjustment, it is inside the bag and you can adjust it without unzipping your bag, losing body heat or waking up too much.

    Tom’s experiment with Reflectix, windshield reflector pad, and fleece

    I spent a couple of nights in the bush in September 2001 to experiment with reflector pads. Temperatures were in the mid 40s F (7șC). None of this was very scientific, but the results were impressive. I used a 40" wide x 60" long piece of REFLECTIX tapered at the foot to 18" wide, a double layer of bubble wrap with aluminum foil laminated to both sides available (in different widths) from Home Depot, and an AUTO WINDSHIELD REFLECTOR PAD – 1/8' of polyethylene foam laminated to space blanket material. Comes in different sizes depending on the size of your windshield/body. I’ve heard that Wal-Mart has the biggest ones made for big trucks.

    I sewed a piece of heavy fleece to the reflective side of the windshield pad but wearing a fleece suit would be as good or better. The fleece is important because it is fairly uncompressible and contains tiny air spaces necessary for radiant heat to pass through before it is reflected by the pad back to your body. Heat intensifies and, to me, felt like I was laying on some kind of solar cooker turned down to "warm". If your body is directly on the pad without the air spaces, you get the insulation benefits, but not the radiant benefits.

    It was so comfortable that I did not need to be inside my bag so I just lay it over me like a quilt. Quilts seem to work well because they usually don't fall off because of the shape of the hammock. This was the most comfortable cool night I can remember.

    Conclusion: Reflectix is an insulation manufactured mostly for the construction industry. It is used as a radiant insulating barrier in walls and wrapped around hot water heaters for additional insulation and also recommended as insulation for camping tent floors and insulation for hot and cold food containers. It is constructed of a double layer of bubble wrap with a layer of aluminum foil laminated to each side. It is around 5/16” to 3/8” thick and weighs about the same as foam pads of the same thickness.

    The reflectix has several drawbacks. The raw aluminum will tarnish after a while, reducing it's efficiency. It is bulky and not as efficient as as the same thickness of foam and radiant reflector combinations. It's biggest problem is the heavy aluminum foil which is laminated to both sides. While it does reflect radiant body heat quite well, it also acts as a heat sink and the aluminum foil will suck heat out from under you wherever the aluminum foil is exposed to the cold air.

    The windshield reflector pad is a much better solution to the problem. The closed cell foam is a better insulator than the bubble wrap and less bulky. The thin micro coating of aluminum reflective material is protected under a plastic coating, eliminating any tarnishing or any tendency to suck away body heat like the Reflectix did.

    The dead air space between you and the reflector is an essential factor in the formula for radiant effficiency. If you sleep inside of your sleeping bag, the compressed sleeping bag insulation under you should have enough dead air space to allow the radiant pad to operate effectivelly. If you sleep directly on top of the radiant pad with your sleeping bag fully opened and laid over you like a big quilt, fleece material is probably the best way to get that dead air space between you and the reflector pad. For winter use, the fleece pants and fleece top make more sense since they are usable both day and night. Of course, fleece booties and fleece cap would really top it off. When wearing fleece clothing, you slip around quite nicely on the pad.

    A windshield reflector pad facing up on top of a 3/8 inch thick urethane foam pad should take you down to around freezing. Ultralite backpackers will cut the full size 3/8 foam pad down to 36 inches long and keep the full length reflector because there is less weight and pressure on the pads under their legs. Total weight of this set-up is about 11 oz.

    So far, this is the extent of our search for the perfect lightweight radiant reflector pad. The automobile windshield reflector pad offers attached insulation to prevent condensation build-up inside the hammock. It is flexible enough and does not interfere with the comfort of the hammock, nor does it pop out from under you in the middle of the night. Used in combination with additional foam pads of less than 3/8" provides comfort, efficiency, light weight and low cost.


    That's from the HH website. I've been wracking my brain on what cold weather system to get and I think this is the one. I'd love an UQ but the idea ofthis shelter makes the most sense to me and they're on sale for $99 and include the overcover. I've read on here tonight some old posts as well of people who've fitted them to their BB's (just recently got a traveler from a site patron) and I figured I'm creative enough to give it a shot onmy ENO dbl.. we'll see... Anyhow, hope that quote helps.. I'm lookin' at windshielf reflectors right now actually.
    "I ain't here for a long time, I'm here for a good time"

    - George Strait

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